Posts tagged as: three

Ssematimba in Fitness Race As Cricket Cranes Run Out of Reserves

By Elvis Senono

Kampala — Cricket Cranes coach Steve Tikolo could have a major decision on his hands with less than a week to the start of ICC World Cricket League Division Three tournament.

This is after Lawrence Ssematimba admitted he is in a race against time to be fit for the tournament that bowls off in the country on Tuesday.

The first choice wicketkeeper who also missed last month’s Easter Series against Kenya is struggling with a groin injury.

“Previously I would feel pain when I squat but I have been working with the coach and the physiotherapist to see my progress.

“Yesterday I worked out and I was not feeling the pain. But I’ll have to do more squats to assess it,” explained Ssematimba.

“I’ve been pushing hard to see that I improve in the next days. There are more physiotherapists coming from Canada and I’ll be in contact with them to see how they can help.

“During the Kenya Series I was at 50 per cent but now I would say I am at 80 per cent,” added Ssematimba who could be replaced by Naeem Bardai in the 14-man team. The UK-based Bardai was initially one of the four players put on the standby list that has since been reduced to two players. This followed failure by Uganda Cricket Association (UCA) to secure clearance of England based Lloyd Paternott’s in time for the event.

David Wabwire is meanwhile believed to be held back by academic engagements.

“Wabwire is still on the reserve list while Patternott failed to attain the required fitness,” insisted national team coordinator Jeremy Kibuukamusoke when contacted.

Uganda

Are Police Harbouring Criminal Syndicate Within the Force?

Some weeks ago, President Museveni made a candid statement about the police, which I believe most Ugandans applauded.… Read more »

Shs100 Million Spent On Refurbishing Venues for World Cricket League

By Darren Allan Kyeyune

Kampala — The countdown is almost over. It is exactly a week left before the ICC World Cricket League Division Three showpiece bowls off in Uganda.

The six-nation competition will have 18 matches played at three different ovals in Lugogo, Kyambogo and Entebbe.

According to the Local Organising Committtee (LOC), nearly $30,000 (Shs108m) has been spent on doing improvements on the three venues for the May 23-31 competition.

“With the support of Uganda Cricket Association and ICC backing, we have done works worth about Shs100m,” LOC Head of Stadia, Hanumant Katkar, told this paper in an interview yesterday.

“The money has mainly been used to repair club houses, buy field equipment and prepare wickets,” said Katkar, also a UCA Board Member.

His committee has bought one big lawn mower, three green mowers, two wicket covers from Kenya, three brush cutters, a trio of manual rollers and they plan to buy a big compression machine for the outfield by Friday.

In Lugogo, where the Cricket Cranes will start their quest for the top two positions against 2011 World Cup finalists Canada next Tuesday, Katkar acknowledges his committee has focused on improving drainage.

“We managed to plant grass in spaces on the field where water used to collect after rain,” Katkar said. “We did some changes to the wickets during the Easter Series against Kenya and after.

However, he states the recent downpours continue to affect the works already done. “Besides having grass grow and keep green, rain has affected us a lot especially keeping the wickets safe and outfield work like painting side screens.”

In Entebbe, a new ceiling was placed in dressing rooms, plumbing and electrical works are on. Permanent side screens were raised as well as ground levelling of the outfield is also being accomplished.

This venue will have two of Uganda’s round-robin matches against Singapore and USA on May 24 and May 29.

With Kyambogo’s drainage relatively better, Katkar’s team concentrated on levelling the outfield ground, grass cutting and improvements on the nets at the University Oval.

Each venue will have 10 stewards and two ground managers during the tournament who, will work hand in hand with security and the accreditation team, on directing traffic (players, fans, officials, scorers and media) during match days.

All venues will be inspected by ICC tournament director Gurjit Singh who arrived in the country on Tuesday.

Zone V Fiba Africa Zone V Championships

The country will in October also host the Zone V Club Championship with Fuba agreeing with City Oilers to take the lead in the organization and fundraising of the tournament.

Three other Ugandan sides wil take part including Betway Power and women’s sides UCU Lady Canons and KCCA Leopards.

“We borrowed the format from Egypt at the previous edition where the federation hosted but with Al Ahly at the forefront of the organization,” explained Tashobya.

Ugandan Para-Rowers Optimistic After International Debut

By Abdul-Nasser Ssemugabi

Kampala — None of the Ugandan para-rowers won a single event in last week’s Para-rowing International regatta but the three debutants returned from Gavirate, Italy in chest thumping mood.

Coach William Mwanga said his athletes Vaster Kyalimpa, Amir Kapere and Tadeo Kintu, all in Arms and Shoulders (AS) category, were timid in the earlier races but soon adjusted to the competition environment and improved steadily in the subsequent events. Particularly, Kapere was Uganda’s best performer, finishing most of the 2000 metres fifth, fourth and third in the ultimate race. His personal best was 12:48:02 minutes in men’s single sculls Heat 2. But it was his fourth position finish that he relishes most.

He retells the experience: “No one believed that I had beaten a Mzungu, and all his teammates made fun of him,” Kapere said in reference to his finish two seconds above Poland’s Leszek Niewiarowski in the men’s single sculls.

“I feel stronger and motivated because most of our opponents came with superior boats, but we train with old-fashioned boats. They train more but we had more power than them. With better training, I believe we can do even better.”

Coach Mwanga said their opponents were only better because they train more and are better facilitated; “otherwise my team impressed me; we have potential.” He added that the organisers were equally impressed by Team Uganda’s performance and FISA, the international rowing body, promised to send them some boats and facilitate a regional regatta later this year.

Uganda

Are Police Harbouring Criminal Syndicate Within the Force?

Some weeks ago, President Museveni made a candid statement about the police, which I believe most Ugandans applauded.… Read more »

Ntungamo Youth Eke a Living From Metal Scrap

By Perez Rumanzi & Alfred Tumushabe

Ntungamo — After dropping out of school six years ago for lack of school fees, Badru Atwijukire, 25, decided to enroll for training in metal fabrications at a workshop in Ntungamo Town.

The Senior Three drop-out was determined to have a source of income to sustain himself and pay fees for his siblings, who were still in lower primary classes.

Atwijukire is the oldest in a family of eight children and their father passed on.

He acquired the necessary skills in seven months of training and got employed at the workshop where he worked for almost a year.

However, an opportunity for him to gain more skills opened.

His uncle, Brason Mwesigwa, who had trained from Kenya in several artisan industrial skills, offered to train him and other young boys from the family at their home in Rwangusha village, Ntungamo Sub-county.

Mwesigwa trained Atwijukire how to smelt scrap and remodel it into several items, including saucepans.

Together with other 15 youths from the area, they established a workshop called Bangirana Metal Works.

They have been making saucepans for almost five years now. They make up to 30 saucepans and several other items a day.

The workshop is located 4kms out of Ntungamo Town on Ntungamo-Rukungiri Road.

Their raw materials include motor vehicle parts, mainly made out of aluminum.

“Our raw materials are basically scrap, which we buy from garages or scrap collection centres. At times we compete with those who want to reuse them as spares parts in vehicles. The materials are so expensive and scarce, which limits our production,” Atwijukire says.

Apart from scrap, they must also have building sand, charcoal and timber. They have a fan developed from a bicycle wheel with the end point pointing into a furnace where charcoal is put.

A metallic container is placed on the fire with raw materials broken down into smaller pieces; they are heated to boil into liquid material. Someone keeps rolling the wheel to produce wind that stokes the fire to a higher temperature. They also keep monitoring and stirring the materials being boiled to ensure everything turns into liquid.

Atwijukire says they first identify the size and shape of the saucepan they want to make. They then make a wooden crate, slightly bigger than the saucepan but of the same width and height as the intended saucepan. The crate has a hole (small opening) at the bottom. They place the saucepan in the crate. They put wet sand in the saucepan and compact it. They also put sand around the saucepan (in the crate) and compact it.

They then remove the saucepan and turn it upside down on a flat surface, pull it out, leaving a compact heap of sand in shape of saucepan facing down. They then bring the crate, still with the compacted sand but has the gap where the saucepan was seated, and fit it into the heap of compacted sand. They also place the crate facing down. This leaves the space in between in a shape of a saucepan. They then pour the boiling metals through the hole/opening on top of the crate.

The process of formation and cooling of a new saucepan takes less than a minute. The outer sand is then demolished to reveal a new saucepan from the liquid poured. The sand inside the new saucepan has also weakened and it is crumbling.

“When Atwijukire was training me, it looked as if I would never get the technology, but when we started working, the thing became simple and I enjoy doing it every day. I now have the money I wanted and I think in future, I will be making more money,” Salim Gumisiriza, one of the group members, says.

They use a hand filer to remove sharp particles from the saucepan and smoothen it before being taken to the market.

Atwijukire says there is always ready market for any product they make. Their products are mostly taken to weekly and monthly markets in Ntungamo District. They also produce on order for traders who want to buy their products in bulk.

While they buy raw materials at Shs13,000 a kilogramme, a saucepan is sold at between Shs8,000 to Shs150,000, depending on the size.

Other products

They also make metal doors, design materials for gate doors and ash trays. They make candle holders as well, which are sold between Shs1,500 and Shs8,000.

The group members say they have asked for support from government but have never been considered.

“We have applied five times to be considered in the Youth Livelihood Programme but they have never even assessed us. When we ask them [YLP officials] why, they ask us whether we do any agriculture too, but for us we are for metals, may be they do not understand what we do,” says Adam Amanya, another member of the group.

Amanya says if they get external support, they would be able to establish a more modern workshop that may use electricity and even produce more items and train more youth.

Mr Bright Joga, the Ntungamo Sub-county senior assistant secretary, says whereas they have seen the group’s many products displayed on the road side, they have always thought that they were made from somewhere and brought there for marketing.

Voices

“We are failing to get proper youth groups to fund because such groups do not always come out to ask for funds, and because YLP is demand driven But these boys deserve funding,”

Kaija Samuel Ruhweza, Ntungamo CAO

“I have always hoped these boys could be helped, they are making great things but no one is recognising them. I wish government support could be can be drifted to such people,”

Patrick Rwakabare, District Councillor for Persons with disabilities.

East Africa: Zuku Owners to Sell Corporate Internet Division

By James Anyanzwa

Telecommunications firm Wananchi Group Holdings Ltd has entered into an agreement to sell its three subsidiaries — SimbaNet, Wananchi Telecom and iSAT– to Synergy Communications (Syncom) after prolonged boardroom wrangles that had threatened to stall the sale.

The development follows revelations that Wananchi Group, owners of pay-TV and Internet service provider Zuku, is planning to lay off workers from next month in a cost-cutting move as the company restructures its business.

The firm has been facing financial challenges as a result of stiff competition in the pay-TV market posed by South Africa’s DStv.

The sale of the three businesses, which are part of the Wananchi Business Services – a unit that deals with corporate Internet provision, is expected to raise additional capital to strengthen the company’s better performing divisions.

“The decision by the board to sell Wananchi Business Services has been guided by a desire to deepen Wananchi Group’s products and services portfolio within the retail service segment,” said Alex-Handrah Aime, the Wananchi Group’s chairperson.

The company was to sell off the unit in 2015 but legal battles amongst the shareholders held back the sale process.

SimbaNet is a licenced public data operator; iSAT is a satellite teleport service provider, while Wananchi Telecom is a tier one data communications carrier.

“The proposed acquisition of the units presents a tremendous opportunity for business growth and investment,” Syncom chief executive Geoff Hardwick said in a statement Tuesday.

“The focus on corporate and enterprise customers perfectly fits our goal of providing high quality, enterprise communications services and products across the sub-Saharan region,” he added.

Wananchi and Syncom however did not disclose the cost of the transaction, which is still subject to regulatory approvals in the countries of operations.

East Africa

Nation Needs More Action, Less Lip Service

Drought, a lack of security and inclusive politics, unemployment and poverty, piracy and the terror group al-Shabaab… Read more »

South Africa: Three Killed, 12 Injured in Taxi Crash

Three men were killed and 12 other people were injured after a taxi rolled on the N4, outside of Brits in the North West province on Wednesday morning, paramedics said.

ER24 spokesperson Russel Meiring said paramedics found the taxi lying on its side in the middle of the road.

Meiring said several occupants had been ejected and were found lying around the vehicle.

The bodies of the three men were found a short distance from the taxi, Meiring said.

They were declared dead on the scene.

The 12 others sustained minor to serious injuries.

Those with minor injuries were transported to Mediclinic in Brits and the seriously injured were airlifted by the ER24 and One Plan Medical Helicopter.

The incident happened at around 09:30 on Wednesday.

Source: News24

South Africa

Families of Trapped Lily Mine Workers Each Paid R200 000 – Labour Union

The families of the three trapped Lily Mine workers have each been paid a lump sum of R200 000. Read more »

Zimbabwe: Tobacco Sales Reaches 113 Million kilogrammes

Photo: The Herald

Tobacco auction floors in Zimbabwe (file photo).

By Runyararo Muzavazi

Tobacco sales have reached a 113 million kilogrammes, with contract system dominating the marketing season. At least 60 049 farmers have sold their tobacco through the contract system, while 20 938 have used the auction system. According to the statistics released by the Tobacco Industry and Marketing Board, farmers have to date realised $307 million, 27 percent higher than the $240 million realised during the same period last year.

To date, 21,5 million kg has been sold through the auction floors, while contract floors received 91,7 million kg. Contract farmers contributed 81 percent of seasonal total tobacco sales against 19 percent for the auction floors.

The average price for the three auction floors was $2,83 per kg, two percent lower than the $2,88 of the 2016 marketing season.

The highest price was $6/kg, while rejected bales stood at 91 047 compared to 62 568 last year.

Reasons for rejection of bales included oversized, underweight, badly handled and mixed hands.

A total of 1,6 million bales were laid, with 1,5 million being sold.

Seasonal exports have increased by nine percent from the same period last year, with 41,7 million kg having been exported to 47 destinations, compared to 42,5 million kg exported to 38 destinations during the same period last year.

China remains the major export destination followed by Belgium and South Africa.

The 2017 export price is 19 percent lower from $5,79/kg to $4,70/kg this year.

New tobacco grower registration has increased by 80 percent from 18 826 in 2016 to 94 849 this year.

Zimbabwe

Work on Robert Mugabe University Begins

The government has begun the process of setting up the Robert Mugabe University with the University of Zimbabwe expected… Read more »

South Africa: Nelson Mandela Bay Deputy Mayor Sacked As Health Mayoral Committee Member

Deputy Nelson Mandela Bay municipality mayor, Mongameli Bobani, has been removed from the position of mayoral committee member for public health, Mayor Athol Trollip said on Tuesday.

Bobani’s replacement would be announced in due course, Trollip said in a statement.

He said the directorate would be placed under his direct political leadership.

“The directorate has been of concern for a number of months given serious allegations of maladministration and impropriety, all of which are being investigated.

“Furthermore Bobani’s public behaviour and conduct had been unacceptable as a member of my mayoral committee and not consistent with what is expected of a deputy mayor,” he said.

He said he had tried to address Bobani’s conduct through the UDM’s national leadership.

“Cllr Bobani has gone too far with his continued unsubstantiated defamatory remarks, spurious public statements and recently laid criminal charges against senior executive administrators.”

He said the process to have Bobani removed as deputy mayor would be pursued through council.

In April, Bobani laid charges of fraud and corruption against city manager Johann Mettler, and acting executive director of corporate services Vuyo Zitumane.

Bobani boycotted the first council meeting in January because he did not approve of Zitumane or Mettler’s appointments. He said he did not have a vendetta against them.

Source: News24

South Africa

Families of Trapped Lily Mine Workers Each Paid R200 000 – Labour Union

The families of the three trapped Lily Mine workers have each been paid a lump sum of R200 000. Read more »

Karatu Car Crash Survivors Arrive in the U.S. for Treatment

By Rosemary Mirondo

Dar es Salaam — Three Lucky Vicent Primary School children who survived the horror crash that killed their fellow 32 children two teachers and a driver arrived on Sunday in the US for treatment (on Monday, East African time).

This is after the Samaritan’s Purse responded to the nation’s tragedy by transporting the hurting children to the US for urgently needed medical care.

According to Samaritan Purse International Relief website, Samaritan’s Purse sent out a DC -8 airplane to Tanzania to pick up the children including Wilson (12), Sadhia (12) and Doreen (13).

The children were accompanied by their mothers, together with a Tanzanian doctor and nurse and World Medical Mission director Ed Morrow

They will be receiving specialized trauma care at a hospital in Sioux City, Iowa.

Upon their arrival in Charlotte on Sunday night they were quickly transferred to a specially equipped Phoenix airplane that transported them to Sioux City.

Thirty-two of the children’s primary school classmates and three adults–two teachers and the driver–were killed in the May 6 crash when their bus plunged off a gravel road into a steep ravine in remote northern Tanzania. They were on the way to another school to take an exam when the accident occurred.

Arusha Regional Commissioner Mrisho Gambo was at the airport to wish the children well in the journey and treatment in the US.

The Samaritan Purse explain on their website that how the plight of the surviving children came to the attention of Franklin Graham is providential at every step and begins with three missionaries who acted as Good Samaritans at the scene of the horrifying crash.

The missionaries, serving with Siouxland Tanzania Education Medical Ministries (STEMM), happened upon the accident moments after it occurred. Jumping out of their vehicle and rushing to join others already scurrying to help were Jennifer Milby, a licensed nurse practitioner; Manda Volkers, a nurse with 25 years of experience; and Kevin Negaard, the executive director of Sunnybrook Church in Sioux City.

As they pulled bodies from the wreckage, the missionaries found three children who, despite massive injuries, still had heartbeats. After stabilizing them, the missionaries helped put them into arriving ambulances, which rushed them to a local hospital.

“Kevin, Jennifer, and Manda were by the sovereignty of God late by an hour and a half that morning to where they were going,” explained Dr. Steven Meyer, a Sioux City orthopedic surgeon and STEMM’s co-founder and board president. “If they had been two minutes earlier, they never would have seen it, and they never would have known about it.

“There’s no question that God put them there at that point in time,” Dr. Meyer added.

Former Member of Parliament Lazaro Nyalandu, arranged a meeting for Dr. Meyer with Samia Suluhu Hassan, Tanzania’s Vice President. She agreed to talk with the country’s president John Magufuli to allow the children go for treatment, which was agreed upon.

Tanzania: Karatu Car Crash Survivors Arrive in the U.S. for Treatment

By Rosemary Mirondo

Dar es Salaam — Three Lucky Vicent Primary School children who survived the horror crash that killed their fellow 32 children two teachers and a driver arrived on Sunday in the US for treatment (on Monday, East African time).

This is after the Samaritan’s Purse responded to the nation’s tragedy by transporting the hurting children to the US for urgently needed medical care.

According to Samaritan Purse International Relief website, Samaritan’s Purse sent out a DC -8 airplane to Tanzania to pick up the children including Wilson (12), Sadhia (12) and Doreen (13).

The children were accompanied by their mothers, together with a Tanzanian doctor and nurse and World Medical Mission director Ed Morrow

They will be receiving specialized trauma care at a hospital in Sioux City, Iowa.

Upon their arrival in Charlotte on Sunday night they were quickly transferred to a specially equipped Phoenix airplane that transported them to Sioux City.

Thirty-two of the children’s primary school classmates and three adults–two teachers and the driver–were killed in the May 6 crash when their bus plunged off a gravel road into a steep ravine in remote northern Tanzania. They were on the way to another school to take an exam when the accident occurred.

Arusha Regional Commissioner Mrisho Gambo was at the airport to wish the children well in the journey and treatment in the US.

The Samaritan Purse explain on their website that how the plight of the surviving children came to the attention of Franklin Graham is providential at every step and begins with three missionaries who acted as Good Samaritans at the scene of the horrifying crash.

The missionaries, serving with Siouxland Tanzania Education Medical Ministries (STEMM), happened upon the accident moments after it occurred. Jumping out of their vehicle and rushing to join others already scurrying to help were Jennifer Milby, a licensed nurse practitioner; Manda Volkers, a nurse with 25 years of experience; and Kevin Negaard, the executive director of Sunnybrook Church in Sioux City.

As they pulled bodies from the wreckage, the missionaries found three children who, despite massive injuries, still had heartbeats. After stabilizing them, the missionaries helped put them into arriving ambulances, which rushed them to a local hospital.

“Kevin, Jennifer, and Manda were by the sovereignty of God late by an hour and a half that morning to where they were going,” explained Dr. Steven Meyer, a Sioux City orthopedic surgeon and STEMM’s co-founder and board president. “If they had been two minutes earlier, they never would have seen it, and they never would have known about it.

“There’s no question that God put them there at that point in time,” Dr. Meyer added.

Former Member of Parliament Lazaro Nyalandu, arranged a meeting for Dr. Meyer with Samia Suluhu Hassan, Tanzania’s Vice President. She agreed to talk with the country’s president John Magufuli to allow the children go for treatment, which was agreed upon.

Featured Links

    Search Archive

    Search by Date
    Search by Category
    Search with Google
    Log in | Designed by Gabfire themes