Posts tagged as: number

Nigeria: 129,000 Digital TV Migrants Face Blackout in Jos

By Marie-Therese Nanlong

420,000 set top boxes distributed during the pilot switchover from analogue to digital transmission in Plateau State would experience blackout unless users pay N1,500 access fee, the state Commissioner for Information and Communication, Nazif Muhammad has said.

The commissioner said, Monday, that the set top boxes are programmed to work for free for a year as government had paid the subscription fees for the year, after which an access fee of N1,500 per annum was to be paid by users. He recalled that the state, which was the first in the country to migrate from analogue to digital transmission on April 30, 2016, had provided 200,000 set top boxes free of charge to the people of Plateau, adding that those who did not get the free set top boxes bought theirs from distributors at a subsidized fee.

According to him, “The idea was to give free television services to those who had received or bought the boxes for one year. It is almost one year and we deem it necessary to inform the general public that by the end of this month, 129,000 boxes will have total blackout unless they are recharged.

“By next month a total of 32,047 set top boxes will have a total blackout and this will continue on a monthly basis depending on the number of set top boxes that are activated in that particular month. This exercise will continue till November, 2017 when a total of 420,000 will be blacked out because over 420,000 boxes have been activated in the state.

“Users should know that when they experience blackout it is not that the set top box or television set is spoilt but because they have not been recharged. Members of the public would soon be informed when, where and how to recharge, as distributors are working on the processes of recharging,” Muhammad implored.

He advised the people not to take their boxes to technicians for repair when they are experiencing black out to avoid damage.

Nigeria

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New Higher Education Council Boss Speaks Out On Suspended Universities

interviewBy Jean d’Amour Mbonyinshuti

In March, the Ministry of Education suspended operations of four universities and some courses in six other institutions over irregularities including inadequate staff and teaching facilities, leaving thousands of students stranded. The suspension followed an audit carried out in October last year by international external auditors in all higher learning institutions, both public and private. The affected universities were given six months to comply or be permanently closed. The Education Times ‘Jean d’Amour Mbonyinshuti caught up with Dr Emmanuel Muvunyi, the newly appointed Executive Director of the Higher Education Council (HEC) and he gave an insight into the matter and what is being done to streamline higher education. Below are excerpts:

You recently had a closed door meeting with the leadership from the affected universities, what was the agenda and the focus of the meeting?

We met last week on Friday with the leadership of the affected institutions and representatives of professional bodies in Rwanda. The professional bodies represented at the meeting were the Rwanda Medical and Dental Council, National Council for Nurses and Midwives, the Rwanda Allied Health Professional Council, and Rwanda Institute of Engineers, among others.

The purpose of the meeting was to agree on how we are going to assess the implementation of the recommendations that came from the external audit in the institutions affected by the suspension. We want to make sure that institutions are all contributing to the advancement of professions in Rwanda; we wanted to clear the previous misconception that some institutions were unfairly treated.

We also discussed the tools and the process that we are going to follow. We have provided guidelines in line with implementing audit recommendations; we will be informed on the implementation and immediately plan for a visit.

So once an institution is found to have fulfilled all that is required, we will also agree on the process of formally informing them that they have been granted permission to reopen.

The tool is elaborate in that even the institutions will be able to make self-assessment, for example, if a certain institution was closed because of lack of enough laboratories or enough professors, they will be able to implement what the tool provides for in line with this requirement.

The spirit is that we want to closely with them to be able to get a solution to the problems.We also discussed the issue of students affected, we informed universities that it is our hope that these institutions are now ready and have fulfilled the requirements to get approval to re-open. The students will be immediately informed and will be able to go back and resume studies.

However, we informed them that in the unlikely event that this is not possible, we shall help the students to find alternatives in other institutions which are operating; this was made very clear.

The third thing that was made very clear is that the standards and norms that the audit was based on are not negotiable and will not be compromised.

So when did the follow up assessment start?

We are not going to wait for all the affected institutions to submit feedback in order to assess them. We gave them a tool that covers most aspects of the institutions but also, the specific areas that they were asked to improve. As soon as they have this, we will arrange within seven days to visit them, so it will be in phases depending on those institutions that will have submitted their responses.

And the tool you said was availed to institutions to follow up on the requirements, what is it exactly?

These are international standards used to gauge the performance of higher institutions, for example, you talk about the programmes, the numbers of students, laboratories, computers, libraries, and all these aspects of a university.This too, has been developed based on the international standards and these are the ones that were used in the initial external audit to assess these institutions.

It is a generic tool that has been benchmarked by other countries and has the components that make up the university.

These institutions have been given the copies of the HEC standards and also professional bodies so that it is easy to do self-assessment even before we audit them.

HEC has advised the students from the affected universities to enrol in other institutions in the event that some do not re-open soon. How are you handling this situation?

The Higher Education Council did not tell students to register in other universities should the ones they were at not re-open soon. We just want the students who were studying at the affected universities to be given other opportunities, so there are two options. One option, and we are all optimistic about it, is that their institutions will re-open. Students can then go back and continue with their studies and I think that is what we all want.

But in the unlikely event that the particular institution is not approved to re-open, students should have an option. So what we have done is help them, we will recommend them to other institutions, which we know are accredited and are allowed to operate and they seek admission for themselves.

Are there some who have enrolled in other universities already?

Not as yet because the academic year starts in September for most universities, especially, University of Rwanda where apparently most of them want to go.We are not aware of any, maybe some have been offered places in some universities, but it is open and we are not limiting any students to go to a particular university.

For students and parents, the suspension is a big loss in terms of time and their resources. What are you planning to make sure that this never happens again?

The fact that these universities were closed should be seen as a positive thing because we do not want them to pay for substandard education.The message across is that you have been getting substandard services and we closed these institutions because we want quality education, worth the value of money you are paying.

The students should see this as a good thing.Regardless of the process in place, we are monitoring universities to see whether they are in sync with the requirements to a level that the government can ascertain if it is fit for students to go back or recommend other universities that are accredited.

Now, to ensure that universities will not be closed in future as was the case, we are building the capacity of HEC to be able to make regular follow ups. Let’s assume that a university or a programme is being accepted, we will expect that below a certain point, an institution will not be allowed to enrol students.When a new institution is being set up, it doesn’t start well-developed, but it should have most requirements.

We shall build a very strong and rigorous follow-up system; we are also planning to have closer collaboration with heads of institutions so that we keep reminding them of the standards they have to follow. What has been happening is that when an institution is set up, there is a minimum standard, for example, the number of students per lecturer. At the beginning, they have the required number, but as time passes, they admit more students and don’t recruit a corresponding number of staff. We will follow-up, so that should the number of the students increase without employing more staff, the institution will be reminded of the standards.

When do you think the final decision will be made for institutions to be re-opened?

It will depend, we will visit the institutions and once we find that they have fulfilled the requirements a hundred percent, I think they will get approval to re-open even the very next day.

If we get feedback that they have done what is required, we will visit them, and if they claim to have done 100 per cent and we realise they only did 30 or 40, we will call them and discuss and see how to implement the rest over a course of six months. This is the time they’ve been accorded. If they have not attained 100 per cent in six months they will face permanent closure. Anything below 100 per cent will call for a discussion. For example, do they need to recruit lecturers or do they need to equip their laboratories, we want to see whether they are going to procure the required computers and required laboratory equipment and if they have put a purchase order, because some are imported, we need to speak to them and see their plans.We are building into this process through dialogue.

Ghana: Insurers Considering Code of Conduct

By Frederick ASIAMAH

The Ghana Insurers Association (GIA) is determined to improve insurance penetration in Ghana and has pencilled a number of interventions in this regard.

Speaking exclusively to Business Day recently, Kingsley Kwesi Kwabahson, Head of Technical – Life at the GIA Secretariat, revealed that the association is developing a code of conduct to check errant practitioners while companies are deepening their training and selection procedures.

“Individual companies have their own code of ethics but we are by and large trying to see how we can bring all of these things together and have a code that is generally setting the minimum standards that if you violate you will be sanctioned even to the extent that if you misbehave in one company, another company will not take you.”

The ultimate impact the Association seeks is to increase the number of insurance subscribers in Ghana.

Insurance penetration

Insurance penetration in Ghana is estimated at below 2% compared to the Africa average of 3.5%.

Experts have described the level as rather worrying for a country that aims at significantly improving financial inclusion.

Much of the low coverage is often attributed to misconception about insurance, helped by mistrust of insurance policy sellers.

According to Kwesi Kwabahson “… if it’s 1.17% to GDP, it gives you an idea that there are more prospects. It means that if we do our things right and we use the appropriate strategy, we are likely to cover.”

Code

Expatiating on the strategies, he said one example is that “we have to fight the issue of perception. People have the perception that insurers are quick to take premiums but slow when it comes to paying claims.”

Therefore, he identified that “we have to pay claims on time. And then we must tell exactly what our products can do… We should not lie about the products; we should tell them exactly what the products can do.”

In the light of this, the GIA has started a number of initiatives, he said, pointing to insurance awareness month, which is a period set aside for sensitising the public on insurance.

“We are also looking at setting up a complaints management system” which will allow people to walk in and discuss any issue they have.

Besides, “the insurance companies are now strengthening their training procedures and selection procedures so that before you become an agent you go through training and you are educated on features of the product.”

He added: “And then, we are also coming out with codes of ethics to sanction people who deceive others.”

According to him, these instruments are not being done only as a reactive measure but also as a proactive move.

“My position is that you have a number of them. You have a blend. Sometimes, you pass a law not because there’s an issue at hand but you project into the future… because once you are in a human environment there are definitely going to be different, different things and so you must pre-empt [them].”

He said the code of ethics being formulated partly because “we want to look into the future and prevent certain things from occurring. And then, there are certain situations where issues are happening and you must take pre-emptive measures to deal with the issues. So it’s a blend… “

Ghana

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Ghana: First Malaria Vaccine to Be Rolled Out in Kenya, Ghana and Malawi

By Elizabeth Merab

Kenya will be among three African countries selected by the World Health Organisation (WHO) to introduce the world’s first malaria vaccine.

The vaccine known as RTS,S or Mosquirix, will also be introduced in Ghana and Malawi starting next year.

It is the only vaccine developed against malaria that has successfully made it to the large scale testing.

In the next four years (2017-2021), the injectable vaccine developed by British drug maker GlaxoSmithKline in partnership with PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative will be administered to an estimated 720,000 children aged between five and 17 months in high-risk areas in the three countries.

Beginning 2018, the selected children will receive four doses of the vaccine — once a month for three months and then a fourth dose will be administered 18 months later.

LIMITED PROTECTION

According to experts, the injectable vaccine could provide limited protection against a disease that killed 429,000 people worldwide in 2015, with two-thirds of them being children under the age of five.

“The prospect of a malaria vaccine is great news. Information gathered in the pilot will help us make decisions on the wider use of this vaccine,” said Dr Matshidiso Moeti, the WHO’s regional director for Africa while making the announcement on Monday in Nairobi.

The pilots are funded by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, the Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria, Unitaid, the WHO and GSK to the tune of Sh5 billion (50 million USD) over four years.

RTS,S was developed by British drug manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline in partnership with the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative to protect children from the mosquito-borne disease.

In clinical trials, it proved only partially effective, offering 40 per cent protection hence the need to be given in a four-dose schedule, but is the first regulator-approved vaccine against the mosquito-borne disease.

SCIENTIFIC TESTING

The vaccine should be used alongside other preventative measures such as bed nets, insecticides, repellents and anti-malarial drugs, the WHO said.

“Combined with existing malaria interventions, such a vaccine would have the potential to save tens of thousands of lives in Africa,” Dr Moeti said.

“This vaccine is a weapon amongst others, it is one of the tools at our disposal,” she added.

The drug passed previous scientific testing — including a phase three clinical trial between 2009 and 2014 — and was approved for the pilot programme in 2015.

The trials aim to assess the effectiveness of the vaccine as well as the feasibility of its delivery to populations at risk as four successive doses must be given on a strict timetable.

FULL PROTECTION

While RTS,S does not promise full protection against the mosquito-borne disease, it is the most effective potential vaccine so far developed reducing the number of people being hospitalised and blood transfusions.

Malaria episodes reduced by 40 per cent in tests on 15,000 people in seven countries over five years of clinical trials and could therefore save hundreds of thousands of lives.

“It is an efficacy rate which is quite low, but given the amount of affected people, the impact will be huge,” said Mary Hamel, who is coordinating the vaccine’s implementation programme.

“There will be other vaccines which will be more efficient, but in the meantime, this will have a significant influence,” she added.

Why Facebook’s Express Wi-Fi Is Going to Be a Game Changer in Kenya

By Margaret Njugunah

Nairobi — Local internet service providers have a very big reason to worry with the launch of a public Wi-Fi.

ISPs failure to be innovative and high prices on data bundles has opened an opportunity for players who are willing to think outside the box.

Surf, the company that recently launched public Wi-Fi to Kenya through a partnership with Facebook and Internet Solutions – is about to revolutionize internet delivery.

Eighteen months ago, the founders of the America-incubated company – which includes CEO of the company Mark Summer – had an idea; to provide Wi-Fi in public places across Kenya.

“For the longest time, Wi-Fi in Kenya has been a reserve of people in offices, schools or upmarket restaurants. People have for instance had to pay Sh300 for a cup of coffee which comes with Wi-Fi. We are however targeting a different demography that includes the consumer market which has been underserved, with available options in these places being too expensive compared to what people earn,” says Summer.

Hence, Express Wi-Fi was born, allowing Surf to take internet service to a market that had been neglected.

When launching a Wi-Fi hotspot, the company focuses on areas that are abuzz with activity and has ample flow of people. This may include matatu stages, chill spots and markets.

“A place that has small businesses such as barber shops, salons, money transfer agents and cafés also make a perfect spot for our service.”

As such, Ongata Rongai, Kiambu, Mlolongo, Wangige and Kitengela are among the places where over 100 hotspots have been opened.

The service, which is ad-supported, has also seen internet users in these places buy data at much more affordable prices and provide them with more options. Prices start at Sh10 for a 40 MB and Sh20 for 100 MB for daily bundles. Other prices include weekly plans of Sh50 for 300 megabytes going up to Sh500 for 3GB.

“How does a person pay to access the Wi-Fi?” I ask Summer.

“In places where we’ve provided the service, we have a branded station where surfers can pay for the internet bundle of their choice.”

With the service, Surf is entering a battlefield of data wars characterized by price drops and bundle packages growing every year in a bid to capture the market.

But this does not worry Summer.

A product of Silicon Valley, Summer is aware of how such competition works and says he is confident that their niche product will gain traction.

“There really is enough pie for everyone, so I do not consider our offering as competition. Our main interest is the job at hand as we have no plans of exploring voice calls and other services offered by players in this market. Additionally, our product is aimed at growing the sector, rather than engaging in competition.”

The company’s strategy is bound to work, Summer adds.

Their strong partnerships, which include one with Internet Solutions, enables them access the network infrastructure and knowledge on the business aspect in Kenya.

“Apart from their technical muscle, Facebook also has a big initiative that aims at getting more and more people getting onto the internet, something that will help our collaboration,” adds Summer.

Summer also says their ‘unbeatable’ speed, will be the stuff to reckon with; “we will be increasing our connectivity capacity depending on how many people are available at a spot. This is unlike other models that do not increase connectivity capacity when the number of people connected rise.”

Kenya: Why Facebook’s Express Wi-Fi Is Going to Be a Game Changer in Kenya

By Margaret Njugunah

Nairobi — Local internet service providers have a very big reason to worry with the launch of a public Wi-Fi.

ISPs failure to be innovative and high prices on data bundles has opened an opportunity for players who are willing to think outside the box.

Surf, the company that recently launched public Wi-Fi to Kenya through a partnership with Facebook and Internet Solutions – is about to revolutionize internet delivery.

Eighteen months ago, the founders of the America-incubated company – which includes CEO of the company Mark Summer – had an idea; to provide Wi-Fi in public places across Kenya.

“For the longest time, Wi-Fi in Kenya has been a reserve of people in offices, schools or upmarket restaurants. People have for instance had to pay Sh300 for a cup of coffee which comes with Wi-Fi. We are however targeting a different demography that includes the consumer market which has been underserved, with available options in these places being too expensive compared to what people earn,” says Summer.

Hence, Express Wi-Fi was born, allowing Surf to take internet service to a market that had been neglected.

When launching a Wi-Fi hotspot, the company focuses on areas that are abuzz with activity and has ample flow of people. This may include matatu stages, chill spots and markets.

“A place that has small businesses such as barber shops, salons, money transfer agents and cafés also make a perfect spot for our service.”

As such, Ongata Rongai, Kiambu, Mlolongo, Wangige and Kitengela are among the places where over 100 hotspots have been opened.

The service, which is ad-supported, has also seen internet users in these places buy data at much more affordable prices and provide them with more options. Prices start at Sh10 for a 40 MB and Sh20 for 100 MB for daily bundles. Other prices include weekly plans of Sh50 for 300 megabytes going up to Sh500 for 3GB.

“How does a person pay to access the Wi-Fi?” I ask Summer.

“In places where we’ve provided the service, we have a branded station where surfers can pay for the internet bundle of their choice.”

With the service, Surf is entering a battlefield of data wars characterized by price drops and bundle packages growing every year in a bid to capture the market.

But this does not worry Summer.

A product of Silicon Valley, Summer is aware of how such competition works and says he is confident that their niche product will gain traction.

“There really is enough pie for everyone, so I do not consider our offering as competition. Our main interest is the job at hand as we have no plans of exploring voice calls and other services offered by players in this market. Additionally, our product is aimed at growing the sector, rather than engaging in competition.”

The company’s strategy is bound to work, Summer adds.

Their strong partnerships, which include one with Internet Solutions, enables them access the network infrastructure and knowledge on the business aspect in Kenya.

“Apart from their technical muscle, Facebook also has a big initiative that aims at getting more and more people getting onto the internet, something that will help our collaboration,” adds Summer.

Summer also says their ‘unbeatable’ speed, will be the stuff to reckon with; “we will be increasing our connectivity capacity depending on how many people are available at a spot. This is unlike other models that do not increase connectivity capacity when the number of people connected rise.”

Zimbabwe: Villagers Contract Suspected Anthrax After Eating Dead Hippos

Nine villagers from northern Zimbabwe have contracted suspected anthrax after eating the meat of dead hippos, the state broadcaster is reporting.

The Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation (ZBC) said as many as 58 villagers ate the meat in Saba village, Binga district.

The type of anthrax the nine appear to have contracted is cutaneous anthrax, as most human anthrax infections are. With proper treatment, most people who contract this kind of anthrax survive.

However, the incident is extremely worrying given the large number of people who may have been exposed to the hippo meat.

Anthrax spores can survive in the environment for decades.

Local authorities and conservationists initially thought the mysterious deaths of up to 11 hippos in the district this month were due to pesticide use.

The number of dead hippos has now gone up to 16.

Some possibly-infected hippo meat was found on sale mixed with goat meat in a butchery, according to a medical officer quoted by ZBC.

News24

Zimbabwe

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Angola: Cycling – Federation Defends Construction of Bicycle Paths

Luanda — The secretary general of the Angolan Cycling Federation (FACI), João Francisco, defended the need to build exclusive routes for bicycle riders as a way to motivate the emergence of new athletes in the country.

Speaking to Angop about the World Bicycle Day, marked on Wednesday, the official added that the existence of a bicycle path would allow the boosting of bicycle use in the country’s 18 provinces and the emergence of new talented athletes that consequently would increase the number of riders for the various national squads.

To him, it is also a project that will in a way encourage people of all ages to ride bicycles, provide more physical condition to them and help in the process of reducing sedentary lifestyle.

He pointed out that there are European countries, with emphasis on Portugal, where in addition to bicycle paths there are parking areas reserved for bicycles, including signs, which would be an added value in the country.

Among several issues addressed during the conversation, the official said that the FACI action plan included work to expand women’s cycling.

World Bicycle Day is celebrated on April 19 due to a psychedelic experience that took place on this date in 1943.

Angola

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Kenya: More Youngsters Facing Depression Than in Last Few Decades

By Nairobi

Kenya — At least 70 per cent of children and young people who experience a mental health problem have not had appropriate interventions at a sufficiently early age.

In an interview with the Capital FM News, psychiatrist and mental health advocate Chitayi Murabula said the conditions include depression, anxiety and conduct disorder, and are often a direct response to what is happening in their lives.

“Mental health problems affect about 1 in 10 children and young people. The emotional wellbeing of children is just as important as their physical health. Good mental health allows children and young people to develop the resilience to cope with whatever life throws at them and grow into well-rounded, healthy adults,” he said.

Depression affects more children and young people today than in the last few decades between the ages of 5-15 years.

Attributing factors of mental disorders in children and young people include sexual abuse, negligence, violence, family separation, malnutrition among others.

Clinically diagnosed conditions include anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, autism, disruptive behaviour disorders etc.

Lack of awareness about mental illnesses is also a hindrance towards acquiring proper treatment as cultural beliefs come into play.

For instance, someone who is deemed to be slow in understanding behaviour and or carrying out their duties etc will be quickly shunned and labelled mad whereas medical attention if sort on time, a clear diagnosis would be made.

“Incidences of children being chained to their beds or trees should be a thing of the past but only if proper awareness is implemented,” stated Dr Murabula.

Dr Murabula noted the need to improve mental health services by increasing the number of psychiatrists which currently stands at 1:420,000, a poor ratio compared to high income countries.

“In line with improving health mental services, programs to help these children cope with the conditions are of essence,” said the medic.

“Each child matures at his or her own pace, and what is considered “normal” in children falls within a wide range of behaviour and abilities. For these reasons, any diagnosis of a mental disorder must consider how well a child functions at home, within the family, at school, and with peers, as well as the child’s age and symptoms.”

Early this month, Kenya joined the rest of the country in celebrating the World Health Day whose theme was “Depression, Let’s Talk where it was revealed that a two in three people are unaware that they are suffering from depression.

According to the latest estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 300 million people globally are now living with depression.

At its worst, depression can lead to suicide. Close to 800,000 people die due to suicide every year.

Suicide is the second leading cause of death in young people between the ages of 15-29.

“It’s worth noting that 75pc of the 800,000 people who die annually as a result of suicide come from lower and middle income countries,” said Dr Murabula.

In Kenya, WHO estimates that at least two million people (4.4 per cent) suffer from depression as the country is ranked 6th with the highest number of depression cases among African countries.

“These new figures are a wake-up call for all countries to re-think their approaches to mental health and to treat it with the urgency that it deserves,” said WHO Director-General, Dr Margaret Chan.

In many countries, the WHO said, there is no, or very little, support available for people with mental health disorders.

“Nearly 50 per cent of people with depression both in developed and under developed countries do not get treatment. On average, just 3 per cent of government health budgets is invested in mental health, varying from less than 1 per cent in low-income countries to 5 per cent in high-income countries,” stated the WHO.

South Africa: Mpumalanga Easter Road Crashes Decline

Mbombela — The Mpumalanga Department of Community Safety, Security and Liaison has thanked road users in the province for their good driver behaviour over the Easter weekend.

Speaking to The Legislature Monitor (TLM) on Tuesday, MEC Pat Ngomane said while final figures of the Easter road crashes would be released later this week, preliminary statistics showed that there has been a decline in road crashes over this year’s festive period when compared to 2016.

MEC Ngomane said motorists, as well as law enforcement agencies from across all spheres of government, contributed to this year’s decline.

He said, however, that fatalities could not be taken lightly as one death on the road is one death too many.

“As much as we have managed to reduce the number of crashes, the number of fatalities remains a concern.

“One death is one too many, that is why we will continue with our strategies to make sure that we drastically reduce the number of people dying on our roads. We have arrested those who chose to disobey the rules of the road, and we will not rest until we bring to book all those who continue to break the law.

“Innocent people die on the road because of people who are selfish and fail to understand that they share the road with other people,” he said.

MEC Ngomane said he could not give the exact figures in relation to road crashes as provincial and municipal officials were still consolidating the statistics.

“Preliminary reports show that traffic officers have arrested more than 200 motorists for violations varying from drunk driving and excessively exceeding speed limits as set in various roads.

“The highest speed was recorded on 15 April 2017 on the N3 Toll Road. The accused is a Korean national who was arrested driving at 208 km/h on a 120 km/h zone in a BMW sedan,” he said.

The MEC also thanked traffic officials for increasing their visibility on the roads during this period.

He said that during operations, traffic enforcement agencies increased their focus on driving while under the influence of alcohol as this was seen to be one of the main contributors to most crashes.

The final results of the Easter road statistics will be released soon, the MEC said.

“As we are heading to another long weekend, our officers’ presence in the roads will be very high and we are calling for community members to make sure that they report bad drivers.”

He also said that motorists who consume alcohol after drinking must be reported.

“Taxi drivers and bus drivers breaking the rules of the road must also be reported.

“I [would like to] call on commuters to get out of either a taxi or a bus driven by a drunk person… start valuing your lives and move away. You cannot pay somebody your money to transport you while he or she is not worthy to drive you,” he said. – SAnews.gov.za-TLM

South Africa

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