Posts tagged as: national

Campaigns, New Curriculum Usher in Second Term

By Ouma Wanzala

Schools re-open for the second term on Tuesday with several activities lined up during the period amid heightened political campaigns ahead of the August elections.

Top on the academic calendar this term will be the piloting of the new curriculum and the release of the report on school arson attacks last year.

Learners will also have to contend with increased political activities, which are likely to interfere with learning in some areas.

Education Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i asked the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) to rein in politicians who destroy school facilities during campaigns.

PROPERTY DAMAGEDr Matiang’i said he had provided several public schools as designated polling centres throughout the country and taken all steps to ensure efficient access to these institutions by candidates and eligible voters.

“It has, however, come to our notice that the property of several public schools has been severely damaged during the political party primaries.

“These actions are illegal and will certainly upset school operations including opening of schools, which begin next week,” the CS said in a letter to IEBC chairman Wafula Chebukati dated April 26.

He went on: “Noting your pivotal role in the country’s electoral process, I request you to use your good offices to remedy this worrying situation.”

FUNDS AVAILABLESchools will also have to conduct co-curricular activities, prayer days, visiting, prize-giving ceremonies and Annual General Meetings this term since such activities are prohibited in third term.

Already the government has released Sh3 billion to secondary schools ahead of the re-opening in order to allow schools to run effectively.

The government will also be embarking on piloting of the new curriculum in 470 selected schools ahead of its rollout in January next year.

The piloting will be from pre-primary to Grade Three.

READ: Rules for new curriculum pilot programme released

Five pre-primary and five primary schools from each county have been selected for the exercise that will end in August.

The new system has three tiers: early years comprising Pre-Primary One to Grade Three; middle-school, comprising Grades Four to Nine; and senior school, running from Grade 10 to 12.

INDISCIPLINE CASESThe new education framework will focus more on Continuous Assessment Tests (CATs) and will see the current classification replaced with grading, according to Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development.

Kenya Secondary School Heads Association chairman Kahi Indimuli, who spoke at the forum, appealed to principals to be extra vigilant this term and act on any intelligence.

“We have asked our members to be regular in schools, and have constant consultations with students so that we can have a peaceful term,” Mr Indimuli said.

He also asked school heads to stick to the school fees guidelines issued by the ministry and, in case of any increase, seek the approval of the Cabinet Secretary.

BULLYINGNational Parents Association chairman Nicholas Maiyo asked school heads to create an education environment for learners free from bullying of learners.

He said the association would not accept a situation where prefects are given power to inflict physical, psychological or emotion harm on fellow students for whatever reason.

Mr Maiyo said parents entrusted their children in the hands of the school administration in the hope that they will be accorded a friendly environment to learn.

Kenya National Union of Teachers secretary-general Wilson Sossion said teachers are ready for the new term.

BUILDING CLASSESSpeaking at a workshop for principals of secondary schools and chairpersons of boards of management at Nakuru Girls’ High School, Dr Matiang’i said the government had set aside Sh6 billion to finance construction of 2,000 additional classrooms in 2,576 secondary schools across the country in order to absorb 1.2 million additional students.

“The funds will also be used to construct 1,000 laboratories and a further 1,000 sanitation facilities to cater for two classes each in the schools,” he said.

It is estimated that each classroom will cost Sh1 million, laboratory will cost Sh3 million while an ablution block will cost Sh500,000.

“In order to meet the staffing needs of the extra spaces created, a projection is made on the basis of staffing norms of schools where a one stream school of 180 students is entitled to nine teachers,” the report by the Ministry of Education states.

PROSECUTIONThe growth in Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) examination enrolment has not had a commensurate growth in secondary schools.

The report further indicates that inadequate secondary school places has been the greatest contributor of poor transition from primary to secondary and proposes that parents make their contributions as well as constituency development funds in construction of more classes.

The CS warned heads of schools and board members that they will be arrested and prosecuted should they misuse the funds as they had a shared responsibility in the school finance.

“Principals and board members should not allow themselves to be influenced by MPs on how to spend infrastructure funds the government has given to them,” said Dr Matiang’i.

Thousands of Free Mosquito Nets Sold On Black Market

By Agencies

Thousands of treated mosquito nets that were procured the by government for free distribution to citizens across the country in the fight against malaria have found their way to shops and streets in Kampala.

The mosquito nets which have a hard texture compared to the other brands on the open market, go for Shs25,000.

Mr Abbas Tuhabwe, a vendor in Ntinda, near Kampala, says he gets the mosquito nets from a certain shop in the city at Shs12, 000. He, however, declined to disclose the location of the shop.

He says the nets are on high demand because they are durable and treated compared to other nets being imported.

Mr Edward Kakungulu, another hawker says he gets the nets through a network of people who manage the stores where they are kept before distribution and those who transport them to different parts of the country.

Both Mr Tuhabwe and Mr Kakungulu say they repackage the nets before selling them to the public.

The Director of Health Services Clinical and Community in the Health Ministry, Dr Anthony Mbonye, says they have so far recorded two cases of theft of government mosquito nets in Kapchorwa and Serere districts.

According to Dr Mbonye, the theft of nets is detrimental to the malaria control programme since it abuses the campaign and leads to the loss of nets in an already expensive venture.

Mr Jimmy Opigo, the Manager National Malaria Control Programme, says one shipment of 574 bales of mosquito nets enroute to Serere in Eastern Uganda was diverted to central region. He says the transporters decided to go to Mityana instead of the designated district.

He says the truck packed at a house in Mityana where the nets were stashed temporarily before being moved to unknown locations.

Under the campaign, the Health Ministry targets to distribute 25 million nets valued worth 331.5 billion shillings.

The nets were procured with funding from the Global Fund, Department for International Development and President’s Malaria Initiative and Against Malaria Foundation.

However, officials at the Health Ministry say they have so far distributed 7,095,479 million nets in 44 districts such as Adjumani, Agago, Alebtong, Amuru, Apac, Arua, Gulu, Kitgum, Koboko, Kole, Lamwo, Lira, Maracha, Moyo, Nebbi, Nwoya, Omoro, Otuke and Oyam.

Ms Vivian Serwanja, the spokesperson says there is a standard procedure being followed while delivering the nets.

According to Serwanja, the mosquito nets are monitored from the moment they are taken to privately owned contracted ware houses fitted with state of the art security systems like cameras.

“From the store, the nets are escorted by security personnel from both the Uganda Police forced and Internal Security Organisation to pre identified sub-county stores manned by trained store managers and security personnel before they are moved to designated distribution points for distribution on a particular day. From that point, the end user receives their net from their Local Council 1 leader and Village Health Teams,” she said.

As Curtain Closes On Party Primaries, ODM Puts Nairobi MP, MCA Tickets to the Vote

By Olive Burrows

Nairobi — The Orange Democratic Movement holds its primaries in Nairobi under the supervision of Deputy Party Leader Ali Hassan Joho.

The National Elections Board Chairperson Judith Pareno has urged party members to come out in their large numbers and vote for their preferred candidate.

“We are using all the gazetted IEBC polling stations in Nairobi. We didn’t merge Nairobi because of the circumstances in Nairobi and there are 330 in total so they should go to the polling stations that are gazetted, they know them; where they normally vote.”

The vote is however only for the Parliamentary and County Assembly tickets given the direct nominations of Evans Kidero — who is defending his election as Nairobi governor — and Gabriel Chapia Bukachi for the position of Nairobi Senator.

Esther Passaris will however need to fight it out for the Nairobi Woman Representative ticket.

On Saturday, the board announced the results of its primaries in Nyanza endorsing governors Cyprian Awiti and Cornel Rasanga’s wins in Homa Bay and Siaya respectively.

It also endorsed Senator Anyang’ Nyong’o’s win over governor Jack Ranguma in Kisumu, Gideon Ochanda’s win over Oburu Odinga and Fred Ouda’s win in Kisumu Central over Onyango Oloo.

Kenya

Go-Slow By Ferry Workers Causes Heavy Traffic Jam

Some Kenya Ferry Services employees staged a go-slow paralysing ferry operations at the busy Likoni channel on Saturday. Read more »

Ex-Street Boy Wins Jubilee Ticket for Bulla Pesa Ward

By Vivian Jebet

Residents of Bulla Pesa ward in Isiolo town have nominated a former street urchin to contest for the seat in the concluded Jubilee primaries.

Despite all odds, Abdi Kasanya, 26 emerged winner after battling out with his three opponents.

Mr Kasanya is optimistic that he will unseat the incumbent Moses Kithinji who is seeking to retain his seat on a PNU ticket in August 8 polls.

He holds a diploma in Social work and has been on the forefront in championing for establishment of a mentorship and rehabilitation centre in the county to help the street families who have turned into drug addicts.

He polled 1,794 votes against Hajj Hajjira Abdi’s 1,161 and Leloon Ismael Lekisho who garnered 781 votes.

He will face off with Mr Kithinji (PNU), Mohammed Ahmed (ANC), Lenah Nkatha (Narc-Kenya), Robert Mugambi (Maendeleo Chap Chap), Mr Idi Kimathi (Independent) and Mr Witherford Mwirigi (Independent) during the general elections.

Mr Kasanya said he will prioritize youth empowerment, talent creation, roads construction and reduction of street families in town if elected in August elections.

Residents led by Mrs Sadia Mohammed said Mr Kasanya who is known to pulling carts at Isiolo market for a leaving is a man of integrity, hard work and principled.

Mr Kasanya thanked locals for nominating him pledging to offer a fresh leadership.

The youthful aspirants said funds allocated to special groups including the street urchins by the national and county governments were benefiting some cartels.

“I will ensure that funds meant for the vulnerable groups will reach to owners if elected,” he added.

Kenya

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Liberia: Nocal Donates U.S.$100K to Mental Health Research Institution

By Henry Karmo

Monrovia — The National Oil Company has presented a check of US$100,000 to the Liberia Center for Outcome Research in Mental Health (LICORMH) as support to government, in an effort to reduce drug addiction and substance use disorder in Liberia.

The money has been provided in partnership with TGS NOPEC’s an oil exploration company exploring Liberia for oil in commercial quantity.

The US$100K project will be implemented in Montserrado and Margibi Counties. According to NOCAL the objectives of the project is among many things to address the rising rates of addiction in Liberia through provider capacity development.

The project aims to train a cadre of addiction specialist in Liberia, build a multi-specialty center for mental health disorders and addiction that includes short-term crisis stabilization and treatment, and preventing the primary and secondary substance use disorders and addiction among adolescents and young adults.

The rationale of the project according Mr. Ambulah Mamey NOCAL’s Public education officer is to develop a short term plan to address issues of substance use disorders in Liberia.

He said currently there is no specialized center in Liberia to offer complete standardized treatment for persons with substance use disorders (PSUD).

Mr. Mamey believes Liberia’s weak law enforcement capacity, porous border control and proximity to major drugs transit routes contributes to an uptick in drug trafficking to and through Liberia.

“The number of addicts and people with substance use disorder in Liberia keep increasing.”

“There is very limited scientific and evidence based approach to treatment, care and reduction and prevention,” he said.

Mr. Mamey claims that repeated efforts by the Liberian National police to raid addicts and drugs user off the streets has failed to adequately address the problem because the approach is wrong.

“The lack of specialized center in Liberia that offers evidence-based standardized treatment for people with addiction problems has been another major challenge,” he added.

Liberia has one psychiatric hospital that provides treatment to persons with mental health and substance use disorder, and he believes that center has limited accommodation.

“The project is linked to the government of Liberia’s National Mental Health Policy and strategic plan which calls for the construction of wellness units in the 15 counties.

Under this project one wellness unit will be constructed and furnished,” he added.

The project provides short-term crisis stabilization and treatment for people with mental illness and will also train 10 addiction specialists to international standard, thus increasing the number of the internationally certified addiction specialist in country.

Drugs addicts (Zogos or Zogese) as they are commonly called occupy a unique place in Liberian history and in our contemporary national life.

The legacy of the civil war and the discrimination and stigma that they continue to face is a stark reminder of their lowly social and economic standing in Liberian society.

Clearly, numerous studies have continued to link mental health problems and the risk of suicide as well as alcohol and drug use disorders.

In the case of Zogos, it is fair to say that no such evidence exist of their mental illness, although their possible drug use and alcohol abuse and the linkages to mental health issues is inferred.

This does not excuse people in the general Liberian population who themselves are at risk of suicide given the pervasive use of illicit substances in the society, and the unresolved traumas from the war and other incidents of violence and communal deaths.

But here, the focus is on Zogos given that they are understudied and their lowly socioeconomic status, which explains the gross neglect that they face.

The death of Zogos and Zogese in Greater Monrovia and Harbel respectively, possibly as a result of suicide could mean that the society has a looming epidemic on its hands.

The time has come for the society to ask: Why are many Zogos dying from a possible suicidal fate?

Gambia: PS Ceesay Says Malaria Control Requires Joint Partnership

By Momodou Faal

Dawda Ceesay, the permanent secretary at the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare has stated that Malaria control requires joint partnership, as the task for Malaria control is colossal but it has to be tackled head on by the Gambian population.

PS Ceesay made this remark on Monday at the commemoration of World Malaria Day at Essau in the North Bank Region (NBR).

The event was organised by the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare through support from the Global Fund and partners.

PS Ceesay pointed out that The Gambia through the National Malaria Control Programme has put in place key strategies to combat Malaria in the country and among them includes the following interventions; free distribution of long lasting insecticide treated nets, to meet universal coverage, targets free access to reproductive and child health services, including prompt and effective treatment for Malaria, Indoor Residual spraying across the country and wide spread community education for behavioural change among others.

Ebrima K. Dampha, the governor of NBR, in his welcoming remarks, said Malaria is the leading cause of deaths for children under five years of age and World Health Organisation estimates that 3000 people die of Malaria everyday.

He pointed out that pregnant women and their unborn babies are particularly vulnerable to malaria, when a woman is pregnant, her immunity is reduced, making her more vulnerable to Malaria infection with dangerous consequences such as abortion, stillbirth, premature delivery and low birth weight.

He thanked the National Malaria Control Programme and their partners for hosting the event in his region.

Balla Kandeh, programme manager of the National Malaria Control Programme stated that World Malaria Day set a platform for intensive debate so that education and awareness levels on malaria are substantially and widely disseminated, noting that the day came as a result of the historic Abuja Summit where 44 African heads of State and Government representatives met in the year 2000 and made a declaration to halve burden of Malaria by 2015.

He added that the day provides countries the opportunity to soberly reflect on the efforts made on tracking the scorch of malaria, noting that it is a moment for stock taken and to renew political commitment, increase advocacy, communication and social mobilisation for Malaria control and prevention.

He thanked Global Fund, WHO, UNICEF and all the partners in the Roll Back Malaria for their support towards the fight against Malaria.

In another development EcoBank donated D52,000 to the NMCP as part of their contribution towards the fight against Malaria. Ebrima Jammeh presented the cheaque noted that the bank has made similar donations to 32 countries in Africa.

Gambia

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South Africa: National Minimum Wage Could Hurt Small Firms and Rural Workers

analysisBy Dieter Von Fintel and Marlies Piek

Stellenbosch University — South Africa will formally adopt a national minimum wage of R20.00 per hour on Worker’s Day next year. There are questions as to whether this is enough to be termed a victory for the country’s working poor? If historical trends continue, our research shows that this might be beneficial for some workers. Others, especially those in small firms and rural areas, may not be so fortunate.

Workers in rural areas and those currently working in small enterprises could be particularly susceptible to job losses as a result of the national minimum wage. The policy framework acknowledges these vulnerabilities. Its recommendations provide temporary exemption for small employers in particular, but none for rural jobs. That means that workers in rural areas could be adversely affected.

We found that most retail jobs were secure after minimum wages were introduced in that sector in 2003. But when we broke this down, we traced many job losses in rural areas. Similarly, many rural farm jobs were destroyed. In addition, if minimum wages continue to be poorly enforced many workers may still be paid wages below acceptable poverty lines.

The challenge is that from May 2018, the minimum wage will be imposed across the country in much the same way. It won’t take into account the different conditions under which businesses operate. The result is that some will experience more stress from a minimum wage than others, leading to unintended consequences.

The case for and against the minimum wage

With its raging unemployment and many low-paying jobs, South Africa faces a dilemma as it introduces a national minimum wage. Higher wages are necessary for better living standards; but wage growth can potentially exacerbate already high unemployment and consequently reduce living standards.

Simple economic models predict that minimum wages destroy employment. However, decades of intense research show that the basic model is not an empirical certainty in all circumstances.

Consensus is slowly shifting, with greater recognition for the role of minimum wages in reducing inequality. Latin America is a case in point where inequality was initially extreme, but declined (at least partially) in response to minimum wages at the turn of the century. One might expect the same benefits in South Africa, which has remained close to the top of world inequality rankings.

Existing evidence on the potential costs and benefits of minimum wages in South Africa is mixed. With the first formal minimum wages introduced only in 1999, local experience is limited. Traditionally minimum wages have been applied only in certain industries and with special provisions. Variations existed by area and firm size. The effects of a minimum wage on employment are varied, depending on what policies are in place and the economic environment within each industry.

Few developing countries have implemented national minimum wages (in other words they are broadly applicable in the same way in all sectors and firm types). This is because informal activity still contributes largely to developing economies. Wages are difficult to regulate in these settings. Nevertheless, countries such as Cape Verde have embarked on national minimum wages in 2014.

Overall, economists argue that wage growth is a hindrance to employment creation in South Africa. For example, in better paying sectors (such as manufacturing), wages negotiated by collective bargaining councils have reduced employment by about 10%.

But the effects in worse paying, non-unionised sectors are not that obvious. These sectors are typically covered by government imposed minimum wage legislation. Only commercial agricultural enterprises cut jobs when minimum wages were introduced in 2003. Non-agricultural minimum wage jobs, on the other hand, have generally been safer.

A national minimum wage therefore has the potential to raise wages without destroying jobs. But we contend that these broad strokes cover up vulnerabilities in vital segments of the labour market. In particular, rurally based and small firms are likely to experience the most stress in response to a minimum wage that covers the whole country in exactly the same way.

The effect on small farmers

Our new research shows that employment on large farms grew after agricultural minimum wages were introduced in 2003. In contrast, smaller farmers bore the brunt of minimum wage legislation whose employment levels declined. By all indications, minimum wages displaced workers from vulnerable farms to those that were already doing well.

Farming has become increasingly concentrated among large commercial operators over the long-run; minimum wages have contributed to intensify this existing trend. These shifts indicate larger – and not smaller – inequalities in agricultural ownership as a result of minimum wages.

Small players must overcome specific challenges – including their wage bill – to remain competitive in local and international markets.

Businesses adopt various coping strategies to survive. An example of this is the 50% wage increase that followed a strike in the Western Cape at the end of 2012. Surprisingly, no jobs were cut. However, farmers across the country increased their defiance of minimum wages. Many more workers were paid below the legislated benchmark compared to before the hike. Growing non-compliance undermines the central objective of paying a living wage to workers. But this illegal practice appears to keep some smaller players afloat.

There was another unintended consequence to the 50% hike in the sectoral wage. Our research shows that agricultural workers who benefited from the wage hike found that other fringe benefits – such as housing and food provision – were cut back during this period.

The eventual path from a legislated wage increase to better living conditions is therefore far more complex than one might imagine.

Rural workers could be hurt

While jobs in the retail sector were previously shown to be immune to the imposition of minimum wages, our research shows that the impact isn’t uniform. Workers in urban areas benefited from higher wages and without job cuts. On the other hand, retail jobs in rural areas were cut.

As with small players in the agricultural sector, retail operators in areas that are separated from central markets face additional challenges in keeping their businesses viable. Some retailers might raise the prices of their products to afford wage hikes. However, customers in impoverished rural areas are likely to cut back on their purchases. Some rural firms therefore struggle to remain profitable.

Vulnerable sectors may cut jobs without extra support

The evidence suggests that minimum wages are not obviously good or bad for all workers. Some segments of the economy – those already vulnerable – are likely to cut jobs when the national minimum wage comes into full force. Time will tell whether a blanket approach will be effective at increasing the standard of living of vulnerable low-wage workers. Complementary policies to specifically support small and rural firms may be essential for minimum wages to reduce inequality in South Africa.

Disclosure statement

Dieter von Fintel receives funding from the National Research Foundation. He is affiliated with Cause for Justice.

Marlies Piek receives funding from the National Research Foundation.

Facts matter. Your tax-deductible donation helps deliver fact-based journalism.

South Africa: Energy Notes Judgement By Cape Town High Court in the Earthlife and Safcei Litigation

press release

The Minister of Energy, Ms Mmamoloko Kubayi, notes the judgement by the Cape Town High court in the Earthlife and South African Faith Communities’ Environment Institute (SAFCEI) case against the Minister of Energy and other respondents. The Minister has now directed the Department to study the judgment, and will pronounce on the matter in due course.

The Minister will also engage all other relevant parties on the outcome of the matter.

The Department reiterates that the South African Government has not entered into any deal or signed any contract for the procurement of nuclear power. However, there are Inter-governmental Agreements (IGA’s) signed between South Africa and the following countries: United States of America, South Korea, China, Russia, and France.

The Minister will engage Parliament on this matter going forward.

Issued by: Department of Energy

South Africa

Dam Levels Decline in Most Provinces

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Fake Insurance Cover Schemes Haunt Sector

By Issa Yussuf

Zanzibar — The Managing Director of National Insurance Corporation (NIC), Sam Kamanga has emphasized to member states of the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) to ensure that hitches hampering use of Yellow Card Scheme are removed.

Speaking on the sideline of the 42nd meeting of the COMESA management committee of the Yellow Card Scheme, he said efficiency of the service would be enhanced by computerizing operations of the scheme to curb forgery.

“So far the insurance business has been good and Tanzania has the chance to benefit more in the region because most of the vehicles pass through in the country,” he said.

Mr Kamanga said adding that fake insurance remains a problem and that they have been working with the police to stop the production. He said differences of official languages and legal framework regarding foreign financial operation have delayed the plans to introduce electronic payment, which is expected to end fake yellow cards.

According to the NIC board chairperson Mr Laston Thomas Msongole, the Yellow Card is essentially a Regional third party motor vehicle insurance scheme that provides third party legal liability cover and compensation for medical expenses resulting from road traffic accidents caused by visiting motorists.

He said besides offering third party liability protection to the insured or the driver whilst in a foreign country, the COMESA Yellow Card Scheme also offers emergency medical cover to the driver and passengers of the foreign motor vehicle involved in the traffic accident.

In his speech to open the meeting, the Zanzibar Minister of Finance Dr Khalid Salum Mohamed said asked members to create awareness and that the yellow card must be relevant to travelling motorists, road accident victims, insurance companies and the public in general.

“Accordingly, the general public in our countries and beyond also needs to be aware of the opportunities that are brought by these instruments.”

Ms Immaculate Morro- ‘COMESA Yellow Card Scheme’ Country Coordinator, said the scheme is currently operational in twelve COMESA Member Countries and one non COMESA member Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Tanzania

Magufuli Fires 9,932 Civil Servants

President John Magufuli has instantly sacked 9,932 workers who have been found using fake certificates. Read more »

Tanzania: Fake Insurance Cover Schemes Haunt Sector

By Issa Yussuf

Zanzibar — The Managing Director of National Insurance Corporation (NIC), Sam Kamanga has emphasized to member states of the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) to ensure that hitches hampering use of Yellow Card Scheme are removed.

Speaking on the sideline of the 42nd meeting of the COMESA management committee of the Yellow Card Scheme, he said efficiency of the service would be enhanced by computerizing operations of the scheme to curb forgery.

“So far the insurance business has been good and Tanzania has the chance to benefit more in the region because most of the vehicles pass through in the country,” he said.

Mr Kamanga said adding that fake insurance remains a problem and that they have been working with the police to stop the production. He said differences of official languages and legal framework regarding foreign financial operation have delayed the plans to introduce electronic payment, which is expected to end fake yellow cards.

According to the NIC board chairperson Mr Laston Thomas Msongole, the Yellow Card is essentially a Regional third party motor vehicle insurance scheme that provides third party legal liability cover and compensation for medical expenses resulting from road traffic accidents caused by visiting motorists.

He said besides offering third party liability protection to the insured or the driver whilst in a foreign country, the COMESA Yellow Card Scheme also offers emergency medical cover to the driver and passengers of the foreign motor vehicle involved in the traffic accident.

In his speech to open the meeting, the Zanzibar Minister of Finance Dr Khalid Salum Mohamed said asked members to create awareness and that the yellow card must be relevant to travelling motorists, road accident victims, insurance companies and the public in general.

“Accordingly, the general public in our countries and beyond also needs to be aware of the opportunities that are brought by these instruments.”

Ms Immaculate Morro- ‘COMESA Yellow Card Scheme’ Country Coordinator, said the scheme is currently operational in twelve COMESA Member Countries and one non COMESA member Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Tanzania

Magufuli Fires 9,932 Civil Servants

President John Magufuli has instantly sacked 9,932 workers who have been found using fake certificates. Read more »

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