Posts tagged as: mayor

Jinja Stuck With Shs 1.3bn Street Lights Bill

Jinja municipality is stuck with an accumulated power bill worth Shs 1.3 billion.

Rajab Kitto, the spokesman, Jinja municipality, says the bill has been accumulating over the last five years.

Local authorities are mandated to clear power bills using collections from local revenue. He says the failure to clear the power bill, prompted Umeme to disconnect street lights plunging the municipality into total darkness.

According to Kitto, they are unable to raise sufficient local revenue to clear the bill.

“Of course you are aware that Umeme cut off its power and demands us a lot of money, which is about 1.3 billion. Unless people pay, there is no way we are going to pay that money. We are not in position to pay”, he said.

Majid Batambuze, the mayor Jinja municipality and chairperson Urban Authorities Association, says municipalities unable to sustain street lighting because of the heavy power bills. He wants government to direct power suppliers to incur the cost of streetlights across the country.

“These urban councils collect less revenue and yet they have a lot of other costs to meet. Street lighting is a very expensive venture. If the government can direct the power suppliers to incur the cost of the street lighting before being contracted, then the problem would be solved,” he said.

He however, says most urban council leaders are opting from solar powered streetlights, which don’t have monthly bills.

Uganda

Are Police Harbouring Criminal Syndicate Within the Force?

Some weeks ago, President Museveni made a candid statement about the police, which I believe most Ugandans applauded.… Read more »

Uganda: Jinja Stuck With Shs 1.3bn Street Lights Bill

Jinja municipality is stuck with an accumulated power bill worth Shs 1.3 billion.

Rajab Kitto, the spokesman, Jinja municipality, says the bill has been accumulating over the last five years.

Local authorities are mandated to clear power bills using collections from local revenue. He says the failure to clear the power bill, prompted Umeme to disconnect street lights plunging the municipality into total darkness.

According to Kitto, they are unable to raise sufficient local revenue to clear the bill.

“Of course you are aware that Umeme cut off its power and demands us a lot of money, which is about 1.3 billion. Unless people pay, there is no way we are going to pay that money. We are not in position to pay”, he said.

Majid Batambuze, the mayor Jinja municipality and chairperson Urban Authorities Association, says municipalities unable to sustain street lighting because of the heavy power bills. He wants government to direct power suppliers to incur the cost of streetlights across the country.

“These urban councils collect less revenue and yet they have a lot of other costs to meet. Street lighting is a very expensive venture. If the government can direct the power suppliers to incur the cost of the street lighting before being contracted, then the problem would be solved,” he said.

He however, says most urban council leaders are opting from solar powered streetlights, which don’t have monthly bills.

Uganda

Are Police Harbouring Criminal Syndicate Within the Force?

Some weeks ago, President Museveni made a candid statement about the police, which I believe most Ugandans applauded.… Read more »

Are Police Harbouring Criminal Syndicate Within the Force?

Photo: The Observer

IGP Kale Kayihura chats with some police officers at Lubaga cathedral recently.

opinionBy William G Naggaga

Some weeks ago, President Museveni made a candid statement about the police, which I believe most Ugandans applauded. The Force, he said, was “full of mafias”. Present on the occasion was Gen Kale Kayihura, the man who has been at the helm for the police for more than a decade. Many must have hoped that the axe was about to fall on the man at the top of the force, now that the big chief himself had declared that he was heading a force full of wrong elements, whom Kayihura should have known if he was on top of things.

By implication, the President was saying the police have in its ranks, a collection of evil characters, including thieves, con men, fraudsters and other scum of the earth. Mario Puzo’s best seller novel, The Godfather, and its sequels Godfather II and Godfather III brought out the character of the mafia better than anyone else. It was a fictionalised version of the mafia in America and their origin in Sicily, Italy. Starting from the late 19th century and for the better part of 20th century, it was a deadly scourge in at least 26 major American cities and ironically, the mafia even infiltrated the police at the highest levels. It controlled drug-trafficking, loan sharking, fraud, gambling and routinely carried out murders on orders from the heads of the mafia families. New York alone had five such families namely, the Gambino family, Lucchese, Genovese, Bonanno and Colombo family.

Any police clogged with mafias surely needed cleaning it up right from the top. President Museveni in his wisdom, however, chose to ask the IGP to do the cleaning and, as a sign of his confidence in the man in the ‘eye of the storm’, the President awarded Kayihura the unprecedented third contract to head the police; stretching his reign to 2022.

The Uganda Police has consistently over the years been ranked as the most corrupt institution in Uganda. It has also had an appalling human rights record, putting it at the top not only in Uganda but in the entire region. The police has been so militarised that it is more ‘military’ than the military itself. While in previous regimes one run away from ‘army types’, today people find the UPDF more approachable and more ‘civilized’ than the police.

The police have imposed illegal curfews on people’s homes and done it with unprecedented impunity. It has tear- gassed and beaten up so called suspected wrong doers in the full glare of cameras and has hired spokespersons who are trained to lie with a straight face.

The most recent case of the police torture of the mayor of Kamwenge Town council, Mr Geoffrey Byamukama, accused of “masterminding AIGP Kaweesi’s killing”, showed the police descend into the unsayable. From the pictures we have seen in the press and on television of the gruesome injuries inflicted on Byamukama one is forced to wonder what kind of ‘animals’ are capable of such horrific acts! The whole world has now seen and it definitely does not make one proud of being a Ugandan.

The torture is alleged to have taken place in the infamous Nalufenya detention facility where he was held incommunicado for four weeks before being transferred to Nakasero Hospital when his condition, became critical. In his statement at his hospital bed, Byamukama said: ” I think this is the right time for God to take me. I am tired and angry. I deserve to rest forever”. This is a powerful indictment of the police.

Ugandans have a right to know what is happening behind closed doors to suspects under police custody. Telling us Byamukama had “prior medical conditions” which “aggravated his situation” is absurd. It can’t justify the torture he went through and the pain he suffered. This is the 21st century for Heaven’s sake and not the 16th century. Statements that the public should hold on until “you get the right information” or that “the culprits will be brought to book” are empty and insulting to all decent people.

Mr Kasingye, the police spokesman, and colleagues should put themselves in Byamukama’s shoes and those of his family. They should realise that what happened to Byamukama and others before them, can also happen to them, members of their families or friends. Brutality like history, has a way of repeating itself and its perpetuators today should know that they may be the victims tomorrow.

Mr Naggaga is an economist, administrator and retired ambassador.

Muntu, Nandala Contest Not FDC’s Biggest Challenge

Photo: Daily Monitor

Determined. FDC party president Mugisha Muntu addresses a rally recently.

opinionBy Ssemujju Ibrahim Nganda

The Forum for Democratic Change (FDC) will hold its 4th presidential elections in November this year.

The party, registered on December 16, 2004, celebrated its 12th birthday last year. The current president, Maj Gen Gregory Mugisha Muntu, and Nathan Nandala-Mafabi, the party secretary general, are likely to be the main contenders.

The party’s National Council will meet early next month to draw the agenda of the November National Delegates’ Conference, which will elect the FDC president.

The FDC National Council is chaired by Ambassador Wasswa Biriggwa and it comprises district chairpersons, MPs and National Executive Committee (NEC) members.

The delegates’ conference comprises the abovementioned individuals plus district secretaries, secretaries for mobilization, district secretaries for youth and women and constituency chairpersons. These are the people who will elect the next FDC leader.

If he offers himself, Muntu will become the only person who has participated in all FDC presidential elections and national presidential primaries as a candidate.

The last election exposed the FDC fault lines and nearly brought the party to a standstill. Reconciling the party automatically became FDC’s main activity for a number of months.

Holding fairly organized and credible elections has distinguished the FDC from other parties. Of course only stupid people expect the NRM to ever hold credible internal elections when Mr Museveni is still breathing.

The FDC deserves credit. And, for me, that is where FDC and Uganda’s problem lies – transition and continuity. I consider this a bigger problem than torturing the mayor of Kamwenge or the kidnap of 12 children belonging to a murder suspect by police.

Africa has remained behind because we don’t know and never prepare for transitions. In Uganda, it is only Asian businesses that usually survive beyond two generations. Here, I talk about Madhvani, Mehtha and Aga Khan.

I hope the Mulwana empire will survive beyond its founders. Already, the Mukwano empire is being run by the second generation, at least guaranteeing its survival beyond the founders.

The colonial administration, with all its shortcomings, laid a very formidable foundation for us but we have systematically destroyed it (foundation). They built and handed over Mulago hospital in 1962.

After running it down, we recently borrowed more than $100 million to repair it. Mind you, in 1962 Uganda had just about six million people.

Today, we are 37 million and our leader lists renovation of Mulago as an achievement, moreover on borrowed money!

Colonialists built for us the first hydropower dam in Jinja with a capacity of 180MW using the Coffee Stabilization Fund. Power from the colonial dam is sold at three US cents per unit while that of Aga Khan from Bujagali is at 13 US cents.

Look at all our towns: Kampala, Mbarara, Fort Portal, Masaka, Tororo, Soroti, Mbale, etc. The only parts of these towns that are planned are those that were built by the colonial administration.

That, for me, is the biggest challenge. People who started the FDC have slowly exited or retired from active involvement. Here, I talk about Augustine Ruzindana, Amanya Mushega, Dan Wandera Ogalo, Anang Odur, Wafula Oguttu, Jack Sabiiti, John Kazoora, etc. Others such as Sam Njuba and Sulaiman Kiggundu have died.

But even those who are still on the scene such as Salaamu Musumba, Reagan Okumu, Kasiano Wadri, Alice Alaso, and Bwanika Bbaale are less active.

We are lucky that Gen Muntu and Mafabi are still interested in running the FDC. We are even blessed that Col Kizza Besigye has refused to give up the battle.

The real challenge is going to be the human resource still available to serve the FDC and the country. Between Muntu and Mafabi, whoever wins, who will they work with? I mean a set of skilled human resource willing to sacrifice for the FDC and for the country.

At the risk of being reprimanded, I think the current quality of FDC leaders in some positions is no match for its founders. And Museveni, whose duty is to murder institutions, has already identified the weak points.

Look at the NRM leaders today and compare them with those who ushered it in. I keep laughing each time I look at James Waluswaka in parliament, the chap who defeated Emmanuel Dombo in Bunyole East. What about Ibrahim Abiriga, who now represents the mighty Arua municipality?

Countries don’t die but I think Uganda is going to break that record one day. The reason I say countries don’t die is because one still needs a visa to go to Somalia, Libya, Yemen, Syria, Afghanistan, South Sudan, etc.

There is absolutely no doubt that Mzee is about to transit. Trouble is that he doesn’t want this even discussed. There are no tested mechanisms that we will employ.

Already, each passing day, Mzee is creating another warlord. What will happen, for example, between Gen Kale Kayihura and Gen Henry Tumukunde when he finally leaves?

Let us, therefore, have a dialogue on who takes charge when the current crop of leaders has gone. At least that should be the debate in FDC.

The author is Kira Municipality MP.

Mufti Mubajje Urges Govt Not to Abuse Torture Act

By Abubaker Mayemba

Sheikh Shaban Ramadhan Mubajje says government should respect the Prevention and Prohibition of Torture Act and avoid turning it into a paper tiger.

Addressing journalists yesterday at the Inter-Religious Council of Uganda (IRCU) offices in Mengo, Mufti Mubajje said the laws should be implemented without fear or favour and those involved should face the law.

He said police officers implicated in torturing suspects should be expeditiously charged as required by the act, and not be hidden by police under the guise of the Professional Standards Unit.

Section 4 of the Prevention and Prohibition of Torture Act, 2012, provides that if one is found guilty of torture, he/she is liable to 15 years in jail or pay 360 currency points or both. According Article 24 of the 1995 Constitution, no person shall be subjected to any form of torture or cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment or punishment.

“Whereas we support the efforts of the security agencies to arrest suspects in fighting criminal activities in the country, it should not be interpreted that security agencies are unconditionally licenced to indulge in acts of torture against the arrested suspects. This is a violation of the aforementioned act and the supreme law of the land,” said Mubajje.

“We wish to deplore and condemn the rising state of insecurity and the equally shocking acts of torture prevailing in the country. Let the case of Geoffrey Byamukama, the Mayor of Kamwenge, and other suspects who have appeared with evident torture marks be the last victims of torture in Uganda.”

Thirteen suspects linked with the assassination of Assistant Inspector General of Police Andrew Felix Kaweesi were recently arraigned before court with gaping wounds and some were limping.

So far, police have arrested four officers, Assistant Superintendent of Police (ASP) Fred Tumuhirwe, ASP Patrick Munanura, Sgt Tumukunde and Constable Ronnie Byenkya for the torture of Byamukama who was also linked to Kaweesi’s assassination.

Mufti Mubajje advised security agencies to desist from inflicting bodily harm since they are sufficiently trained to extract information from suspects without unnecessarily violating their human rights.

On the current volatile security situation, Mubajje said religious leaders are worried about the high crime rates in the country especially in the districts of Masaka, Bukomansimbi and Lwengo. He said that if not controlled, the vice of criminals dumping threatening letters could spread to other parts of the country.

“We, therefore, call upon all the security agencies tasked with fighting crime to increase cooperation and information sharing among them and the public,” Mubajje said.

He further appealed to religious leaders to avoid apportioning blame to one religion or another as it incites hatred.

Uganda

States Split On Funding Mechanisms to Bail Out EAC

East African Community (EAC) partner states are divided on the proposed financing mechanisms to bail out the… Read more »

Grim Torture Images Ignite Anger Against ‘Police

Photo: Daily Monitor

Agonised. Kamwenge Town Council mayor Geoffrey Byamukama at Nakasero Hospital in Kampala.

Ugandan rights activists say grisly images of the torture of a detained politician showing septic wounds on his body highlight escalating brutality and impunity by the country’s security personnel.

Pictures began circulating online and in local media on Thursday of Geoffrey Byamukama, mayor of a small town in western Uganda, lying on a hospital bed with gaping wounds on his swollen knees and ankles, and bruises elsewhere on his body.

Eric Rugira – a friend of Byamukama who visited him in the hospital where he is being treated and held – said Byamukama had told him the wounds came from “hours of torture” at the hands of police shortly after his arrest.

“He is in a terrible shape,” Rugira said.

The images of Byamukama have elicited widespread anger and denunciation from Ugandans on social media. He was arrested on April 5 on suspicion he had participated in the murder of a senior police official, Andrew Felix Kaweesi, on March 17.

Security services deny accusations of using torture to wring confessions from suspects.

President Yoweri Museveni, 72, has often expressed support for his top police boss, whom he has praised for helping contain protests against his government.

Police spokesman Asan Kasingye said two security personnel had been arrested in connection with Byamukama’s torture but gave no further details.

“We do not condone torture … it is not our method of work,” he told Reuters news agency.

Sarah Birete, programme director at the Centre for Constitutional Governance, disagreed.

“Torture to get information from suspects is the standard now and we are yet to see more. This is typical in an illegitimate regime where impunity reigns,” she said, adding police have also been accused of kidnappings and robberies.

A total of 22 suspects have so far been charged in connection with Kaweesi’s murder, although Byamukama was not among those charged. Some have appeared in court shirt-less, their bodies also showing what appeared to be torture marks.

Some government critics have pointed to rivalry among various top security officials and said the murder was possibly an assassination by Kaweesi’s enemies within the police.

Museveni, in power since 1986, won reelection last year in a disputed poll that several international observers said lacked credibility and transparency.

“We appear to be going back to the dark days … when extrajudicial measures were being used to resolve crime,” said Nicholas Opiyo, a rights lawyer and activist.

Lukwago Vows to Fight KCCA Amendment Bill

By Moses Kyeyune

Parliament — Two years after it had been shelved, The Kampala Capital City Authority Bill (2015) is yet again on the floor of Parliament.

The bill tabled by Ms Benny Namugwanya, the minister of State for Kampala City Authority maintains the primary highlights and justifications for its push.

The main object of the bill is “to provide for the Lord Mayor to be elected by the Council from the councilors; to clarify the roles of the Lord Mayor [and] to rationalise the provisions relating to the Metropolitan Physical Planning Authority with the structure and provisions relating to the Capital City Authority and related matters.”

According to the highlights of the bill, Mr Frank Tumwebaze, the then Minister of Presidency and Kampala stated that the existing law is faced with several defects, among them, the continued administration of the City under a decentralised system yet it was given a ‘special status’ as a City Authority and that this was the main cause of “contradictions and clash of roles.”

Other defects according to Mr Tumwebaze was in section 11(1, b)of the current law which “vests the power to convene and preside over meetings of the Authority only in the Lord Mayor [and that] in the absence of the lord mayor, many fundamental activities of the Capital city cannot be discharged and implemented.”

Pertaining position, powers and roles of the lord Mayor, the minister stated that, it is erroneous to provide for the Mayor to have executive powers and as the “political head of the Capital City yet Kampala Capital City is administered by the Central Government where the minister should be the political head with executive powers.

As a remedy to the ‘defects’ Mr Tumwebaze proposed the need “to re-assert the powers of the central government in the administration of Kampala Capital City Authority by vesting more powers in the Minister by making him or her the Political Head of the Capital City.”

The bill under clause 5(4) provides for the Lord Mayor to be elected from within the composition of the council.

Section 9 2hich provides for the election of the Lord mayor will be amendend to read thus.

“There shall be a Lord Mayor and a Deputy Lord Mayor of the Capital City [who] shall be elected by the Council from among the councilors (whose] elections shall be presided over by the Electoral Commission.”

If adopted by Parliament, the Lord Mayor who Chairs Council sessions will be elected from within the Composition of the council, breaking the Status quo where the Mayor has been directly elected by city dwellers.

The Lord Mayor will also be the political Head of the Council and not the City Authority under section 8 of the Principle law.

The amendments are enrooted in recommendations contained in the 2013 Report by Justice Catharine Bamugemereire, which held Lukwago liable of abuse of office, misconduct and incompetence.

“The Tribunal proposes … a hybrid that merges the need for a Lead Politician who is driven by the need for service delivery but whose origins are in the electoral system., “the report reads in part.

However, City Lord Mayor, Erias Lukwago has condemned the move. In a telephone interview with this reporter, he said that “the proposals are only intended to disenfranchise the people of Kampala from electing their political head.”

“How can you have a political head of a legal entity that is not directly elected by the people,” said Lukwago.

The Bamugemereire report refuted this school of thought, asserting that electing the Lord Mayor from the Councilors, “would still give way to a City Mayor who was ultimately elected by the people since the five positions are filled by way of election by universal adult suffrage.”

The bill proposes that Section 7 (c,d,e,i,o and p) be repealed to strip the City Council of powers to initiate and formulate policy; monitor the general administration and provision of services in the divisions; enact legislation for the proper management of the Capital City; monitor the delivery of services within its area of jurisdiction; mobilise the residents of the Capital City to undertake income generating activities and self-help community projects and assist the City division in mobilising the residents to pay local taxes respectively.

Mr Lukwago said that is sheer political witch hunt.

“Today they might look at me as an individual but the matter should go beyond Lukwago and consider the plight of the population, it is irrational to simply bring laws for the sake of firefighting,” he said.

The Lord Mayor says that the same bill was defeated in 2015 when it was first introduced because “it is hinged on emotion rather than reason.”

“Why did they have to bring the same old ‘thing’ do you realise that the then Minister [Tumwebaze] simply conceded defeat?” asked Lukwago.

“They have always struggled to bring such draconian laws and failed, what is it that they fought for?” he added.

Not new law, the Ms Beti Kamya, the Minister of Kampala city Authority said that the law is premised on clear gaps that have frustrated business in the city.

“Under this approach, the City Mayor would be chosen from among the five mayors of the Division Urban Councils,” it adds.

New KCCA Amendment Bill Tabled in Parliament

By Moses Kyeyune

Parliament — Two years after being shelved, the Kampala Capital City Authority Bill (2015) is yet again on the floor of Parliament.

The bill was tabled by Ms Benny Namugwanya, the State minister for Kampala City Authority.

Upon receiving it, Ms Rebecca Kadaga, the Speaker to Parliament on Tuesday tasked the Presidential Affairs Committee to handle it expeditiously within 49 days.

“This bill has only been reprinted it has been around for some time lying somewhere, so no more delays will be allowed,” Ms Kadaga said.

When it was introduced in 2015, the draft law was castigated by several critics and sections of the civil society who argued that it was aimed at denying city dwellers their voting rights since it proposed that the Lord Mayor would be elected by elected city councillors.

According to the highlights of the shelved bill, Mr Frank Tumwebaze, the then Minister of Presidency and Kampala stated that the existing law is faced with several defects, among them, the continued administration of the city under a decentralised system yet it was given a ‘special status’ as a city authority and that this was the main cause of “contradictions and clash of roles.”

Another defect, according to Mr Tumwebaze, was in Section 11(1, b) of the current law which; “vests the power to convene and preside over meetings of the authority only in the Lord Mayor [and that] in the his absence, many fundamental activities of the capital city cannot be discharged and implemented.”

Pertaining the position, powers and roles of the Lord Mayor, the minister stated that, it is erroneous to provide for the mayor to have executive powers and as the “political head of the capital city yet Kampala Capital City is administered by the Central Government where the minister should be the political head with executive powers.”

As a remedy to the ‘defects’ Mr Tumwebaze proposed the need “to re-assert the powers of the central government in the administration of Kampala Capital City Authority by vesting more powers in the minister by making him or her the political head of the capital city.”

The bill under Clause 5(4) provides for the Lord Mayor to be elected from within the composition of the council.

The bill proposes the amendment of Section 9 which provides for the election of the Lord Mayor to amendend to read: “There shall be a Lord Mayor and a Deputy Lord Mayor of the Capital City [who] shall be elected by the Council from among the councillors (whose] elections shall be presided over by the Electoral Commission.”

If adopted by Parliament, the Lord Mayor who chairs Council sessions will be elected from within the composition of the council, breaking the status quo where the Lord Mayor has been directly elected by city dwellers.

The Lord Mayor will also be the political Head of the council and not the City Authority under Section 8 of the principle law.

Most amendments in the new bill are rooted in recommendations contained in the 2013 Report by Justice Catharine Bamugemereire, which held Mr Lukwago liable of abuse of office, misconduct and incompetence.

Responding to the Bill, Mr Erias Lukwago said the proposals are intended to disenfranchise the people of Kampala from electing their political head.

“How can you have a political head of a legal entity that is not directly elected by the people,” Mr Lukwago asked.

Mr Lukwago said what is being planned is sheer political witch hunt.

“Today they might look at me as an individual but the matter should go beyond Lukwago and consider the plight of the population, it is irrational to simply bring laws for the sake of firefighting,” he said.

He says the same bill was defeated in 2015 when it was first introduced because “it is hinged on emotion rather than reason.”

Despite several attempts, Daily Monitor failed to get a comment from Kampala Minister, Ms Beti Kamya or her predecessor Mr Tumwebaze.

Ibuka Calls for Special Genocide Memorial in Huye

By Emmanuel Ntirenganya

Officials from the Southern Province and the Umbrella organisation of Genocide survivors’ associations (Ibuka) have requested a special genocide memorial centre to be built in the former Butare Prefecture to highlight the responsibility of the then local leaders in the planning and execution of the Genocide against the Tutsi in 1994.

The memorial would also warn people against the misuse of the university and its premises , which was the case in the former regime as university graduates were largely involved in the realisation of the genocide, Ibuka President, Jean Pierre Dusingizemungu told Sunday Times.

Huye District Mayor Eugène Kayiranga Muzuka said that the area needs a special Genocide memorial centre, stating that it is where the measurement of Rwandans’ noses and heights by the white colonisers [something that was used divide Rwandans along ethnic lines] and this was done at the former Institute of Scientific and Technological Research (IRST].

Butare is also the place which had the country’s only university at the time.

Dusingizemungu said that people who studied at the National University of Rwanda were considered elite and intelligent and were involved in the planning of the Genocide and mobilizing others because the general public followed what they said.

Théodore Sindikubwabo, who became the interim President of Rwanda during the Genocide against the Tutsi; former Prime Minister Jean Kambanda; Pauline Nyiramasuhuko, Minister of Family and Women’s Development all hail from Butare.

Also from Butare was Joseph Habyarimana Gitera who promoted the 10 commandments of Bahutu which incited hatred of Hutu against Tutsi.

Kambanda and Nyiramasuhuko were convicted by International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) for their role in the Genocide and are serving life sentences.

“We think that all that history of bad governance at national level, can be documented from there (former Butare) because we consider that the knot or the cradle of the Genocide,” Mayor Muzuka said.

Based on that, Dusingizemungu said “we realised that such areas need a particular Genocide memorial centre like other places which had particular history that has lessons to offer,” he said, referring to Nyange Genocide Memorial Centre which was recently turned into a national level memorial to remind people of the former p,riest Athanse Seromba, who ordered the use of a bulldozer to demolish a church building in Ngororero District, killing about 2,000 Tutsi who had taken refuge inside.

“The special memorial centre in Huye will serve as a place where people can come and learn about what happened in the area and the officials who partook in the establishment of genocide ideology and disseminating it, and warn them against its recurrence,” Dusingizemungu.

‘Gukora’ as a euphemism for ‘killing’, which left many Tutsi dead

Dusingizemungu said that it is in Huye’s Imberabyombi Hall (multipurpose hall) where the first speech of the then so-called ‘caretaker government’ was delivered whereby ‘Gukora,’ a Kinyarwanda word meaning ‘work’ was first used as euphemism for ‘killing’, as a means to incite Hutu to kill Tutsi and justifying the slaughter as ‘worthy work’ during the Genocide.

MP Evariste Kalisa said that the Southern Province has substantial history about the Genocide against the Tutsi, starting from the [first] arrival of missionaries [in Save], the speeches of Gitera, Sindikubwabo, Kayibanda, and the schools that were there.

Memorial for children and women killed during the genocide

Meanwhile, Governor Mureshyankwano said that the Province also need advocacy to get budget to construct a genocide memorial centre at Kibilizi in Nyanza District where children and women were killed during the genocide against the Tutsi.

According to information from Nyanza District, over 350 women and children were killed during the 1994 Genocide at Bambiro Mountain in Kibilizi Sector, Nyanza District.

Interahamwe militia first raped women victims before ruthlessly killing them, together with the children.

“That is the particularity of the genocide on how children and women were killed. Indeed, if we can get the budget, it can help us set up such a memorial centre so that we give due significance to the victims,” she said.

South Africa: Minister Naledi Pandor Hands Over a Mobile Computer Lab to Isigidisabathembu Primary School, 6 May

press release

Learners at iLenge-Majuqule village in UThukela District Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal stand to benefit from an initiative by the Department of Science and Technology, aimed at improving access to science and technology in the country’s deep rural areas.

The Minister of Science and Technology, Naledi Pandor, will on Saturday, 6 May hand over a mobile computer lab to Sigidisabathembu Primary School, which is expected to improve mathematics and science skills in the district where performance in these subjects has been poor. The facility will also see teachers in the district receiving training in teaching computer-based curricula.

Supported by the Deputy Minister of Science and Technology, Zanele Magwaza-Msibi, Minister Pandor will also interact with members of the community members, in an imbizo organised to discuss issues that may need government’s intervention in the area.

An exhibition with interactive displays on science will also form part of the handover, to further demonstrate the value of science in society.

Expected to attend are the Premier of KwaZulu-Natal, Willies Mchunu, KZN MEC for Education, Mthandeni Dlungwana, Mayor of UThukela District Municipality, Cllr Alfred Mazibuko and Mayor of Alfred Duma Local Municipality, Cllr. Vincent Madlala.

Issued by: KwaZulu-Natal Education

South Africa

We Can Do More to Spur Domestic Tourism

On Tuesday morning, Rwanda received 10 Eastern Black Rhinoceros from South Africa. The development is yet another… Read more »

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