Posts tagged as: mathematics

Liberia: Mixing Arts With Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

By Claudia Smith

It Takes a Village Africa, Founded by Matu Davis and her two artistic daughters, Erica Davies Cole (Spokesperson) and Evonne Adebo, have begun focusing on their Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) program, and have now incorporated Arts (STEAM) to improve competitiveness in science and technology development for children who require a more creative way of learning. “The first program that we are doing, called Girls in Technology, is another aspect of the STEM. STEAM is where we incorporate the arts. My sister is an artist and she recommended that arts be added into the STEM program,” Erica added. “We are partnering with Liberian organizations that need these STEM and STEAM components.”

STEAM is an educational program that has been executed across the world, but is now in Liberia for the first time. It engages students in incorporated learning as they explore the world around them, thus allowing them to create innovative solutions to problems, and communicate their results while learning Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math.

STEAM is more than just the subjects, it is the intentional mixing of core contents with arts to inspire all students to think deeply, develop creative solutions, and aspire to a greater future. “We have another organization that’s doing arts where we take the children there to perform arts, drawing, different things of that nature just to be able to open up their creative third eye,” Erica stated. She says she and her siblings grew up with the fundamentals of arts, where they we were able to play violin, piano, learn Latin, Ballet, painting, etc.

“We also engaged another organization in August that was able to have a Robotics Camp, teaching kids the dynamics of how to put together the mechanics (ROBOTS). With STEM, they also get to learn the Periodic Table, about carbon and carbon monoxide, which is very important,” she added. Erica also believes that children who are aware of different things that they sometimes don’t learn in school will be able to learn simplistic concepts through the STEAM program.

Meanwhile, the international focus of the STEM program is to develop rigorous math and science skills through engineering, while the STEAM initiative embraces the integration of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics to engage all students in authentic learning STEM is a global initiative, and for Erica and It Takes a Village Africa, their inspiration is the children.

“I look at the children here in Liberia and it really brightens up my day. I see a lot of the children that’s here that are smart, creative and artistic. But they’ll go to school and be considered dull; and they are not, they are geniuses. We need to give them the tools to succeed” she revealed.

“We at It Take a Village Africa want to provide the children with the tools to be able to succeed by accommodating them. With each pupil’s profile, we are able to test them and place them where they need to be placed and be in cooperation with the parents as well. Their parents and the holistic community as a whole will play a major role; therefore, we engage the parents and don’t want this to be something the kids just come or sneak into; It takes a village to raise a child.

Liberia

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UNEB Releases 2017 Exam Timetables

By Yudaya Nangonzi

O-levels begin on October 16 to November 20, PLE November 2 to 3 and UACE November 13 to December 5

Uganda National Examinations Board (Uneb) has today released timetables for the October/November examinations for all the three levels of examinations this year.

In a statement, Uneb spokesman Hamis Kaheru has advised teachers, parents and candidates to prepare for the exams early.

“Prospective candidates are advised to contact their head teachers to confirm their registration status. Students not yet registered should try next year,” Kaheru is quoted as saying.

He added that registration for the 2017 Primary Leaving Examinations (PLE), Uganda Certificate of Education (UCE) and Uganda Advanced Certificate of Education (UACE) has ended.

Parents can check the registration status by typing; Reg [space] full index number & send to 6600 on only MTN and Airtel networks. Using a smartphone or internet, verification can be done via the Uneb page https://ereg.uneb.ac.ug/reg_status. The page also comes with a photograph of the candidate.

According to Kaheru, registers have been issued to heads of centers for crosschecking while those who have not received theirs are encouraged to consult their area supervisors or district inspectors of schools.

Recently, Uneb executive secretary Dan Odongo indicated that at least 1,072,740 candidates had registered for exams at all three levels this year compared to last year’s 1,068,352.

According to the timetables, PLE candidates will start writing their exams on November 2 with Mathematics and Social Studies and Religious Education before ending on November 3 with Integrated Science and English.

The papers, where no extra time is to be allowed, will last 2hrs and 15 minutes save for mathematics with 2hrs and 30 minutes. Uneb has, however, given 45 extra 45 minutes for each paper to candidates with special needs.

Odongo has advised head teachers and P7 teachers to ensure that candidates are carefully briefed and where possible, parents are encouraged to attend the briefing session on November 1.

UCE candidates will be briefed on October 13 while the first papers; 535/3 Physics (practical) and 612/2 IPS Still Life/Nature will be written on October 16, 2017. Candidates will end their exams on November 20 with Technical, Mechanical, Building and electrical papers.

On November 10, briefing of UACE candidates will start. On November 13, the candidates will write their exams starting with European History III; History: World Affairs 4 and Mathematics 1.

In the afternoon, candidates will write History, Economic and Social History of East Africa and Mathematics 2 papers. UACE exams will end on December 5 with various language subjects.

Odongo has warned that the board will publish the names of all candidates, supervisors, invigilators, schools or anyone who will be found having involved themselves in any form of examination malpractice.

Fake Maths Books Flood Market Ahead of Exam

Photo: Jared Nyataya/The Nation

Students at Moi Girls High School tackle their mathematics paper 1 exam during the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education on November 7, 2016.

By Ruth Mbula, Elgar Machuka

Kenya Literature Bureau (KLB) has raised the red flag over pirated mathematical log tables that have flooded the market in parts of the country.

Kisii, Kisumu and Eldoret top in the list of areas where the illegal business is thriving.

The fake books could have adverse effects on the 2017 Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education mathematics examination results for students from around the affected counties.

In Kisii County, three people were on Monday seized with counterfeit copies of the just-released sixth edition of mathematical tables.

SELLING

“We spotted the three together with others who escaped arrest selling the books near designated bookshops in Kisii town at a relatively cheaper price than the genuine ones,” said Mr Isaac Korir, a customer service manager at KLB.

The Kenya Copyright Board and the Anti-Counterfeit Agency have taken over the matter.

Mr Korir said the pirated books went for Sh300 while the original books cost Sh520 in bookshops.

“Unsuspecting parents and students will go for the cheaper ones not knowing the books are fake and could lead to poor results,” he said.

Bookshop owners who requested anonymity for the safety of their businesses, said pirated books offered unfair competition leading to stagnated business and losses.

Kenya

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Most Schools Ignore Holistic Learning, Says Report

By Ouma Wanzala

Secondary schools are only focusing on academic excellence and giving less focus on producing all-round students who can serve the society, a report has revealed.

The report indicates that in most schools, vision, mission and motto are about the institutions being centres of academic excellence.

The study conducted by the Centre for Mathematics, Science and Technology Education in Africa (CEMASTEA) show that academic performance was at 58 per cent, holistic view at 27 per cent, character or value system at 10 per cent and national goal and aspiration at five per cent.

The holistic view is about making a student an epitome of physical, moral, spiritual and academic excellence while the national goal and aspiration seeks to provide quality education to students and prepare them for national development.

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

At the same time, character or value system is about producing an educated, disciplined and determined person ready to serve while academic performance is about being a leader in academic excellence.

“In most schools vision, mission and motto are just statement to fulfil statutory requirements with little evidence of efforts to make the vision an integral and vibrant facet of the school community,” notes the report that was released recently during a school heads and boards of management workshop in Nakuru.

The aspirations were generally used to refer to what the school owners or managers wanted the students to achieve at the end of their four-year period in school.

“There is a need for the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) model schools to adjust their vision to reflect the aspiration for becoming an effective model school,” recommends the report.

The government has stepped up promotion of science-related subjects in secondary schools across the country.

POOR INFRASTRUCTURE

Some of the challenges that have been identified are poor school infrastructure, school climate, under-staffing, inadequate teaching and learning resources, poor attitude by both teachers and students and lack of role models.

Vision 2030 is premised on more students taking up mathematics and science in the hope that this will drive scientific inquiry and innovation.

Already, more than 306 teachers have been lined up for training starting August 14 to 18 in eight regions across the country.

Statistics indicate that its only 22 per cent of students in universities that are taking science-related courses compared to 70 per cent of students in South Korea and Singapore.

CEMASTEA director Stephen Njoroge said schools that have been identified are required to work closely with others not in the programme in their counties.

Memonics – I Give Up! On Maths!

opinionBy Lois Nakibuuka

Research has proven that Mathematics is not difficult, it is just that students do not want to persevere or ‘stay with’ a problem or formula long enough to get it. Some could argue that there are those that are gifted in the left side of their brains consequently, they find it easier to get the Mathematical concepts.

One of the major hindrances to getting the Mathematical concepts right is the very first time an idea or formula is taught. If not done correctly (as in most cases, I am a living witness) or if not totally understood, then the basis for the ‘Math Blues’ begins there and then. Because there is usually a rush to move on to the next topic and the next in order to finish the syllabus, the stage is set for failure, no topic is well understood and yet most topics are related so you totally need a good foundation to build on!

Having said that, what can one do to remember formulas that are needed to solve Mathematical exercises? There are no ‘set in’ stone rules but many students and teachers advise some of the following.

Practice makes perfect and in this case permanent. I am sorry but there are no two ways about it! You must repeatedly go over what you have learned many times to enable the idea move to the long-term memory. To do this some people write down formulas several times until they can write them without looking. Flash cards also come in handy in this subject. Using different colors for the cards, highlighting and bolding the fonts will aid your memory of all those formulas.

Also, sticking the concepts and formulas you have to learn on the surfaces where you can easily look at them numerous times during the day will do much in embedding the formulas in your memory!

Creating a story out of a Mathematical formula will definitely make it stick for life in your memory.

For example, the formula for measuring the volume of a cylinder:pi × r2 × Height.

Your very short story derived out of this would be: I bought a pie with two ribbons wrapped around its height.

Another basic formula;Perimeter of a rectangle: l + w + l + w, can become: When you are in a box, you must look(l) and watch(w) and then look(l) and watch(w) some more!

Lois Nakibuuka is an educator and counsellor

Rwanda

Engineering Students Design Prototype Solar Car in Rwanda

A group of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) engineering students from Kicukiro District have built… Read more »

School Sex Education Programmes Failing Students

Photo: Anders Kelto/PRI

Contraception in a Kenyan clinic.

analysisBy Estelle Monique Sidze, Guttmacher Institute and Melissa Stillman

Imagine giving Kenyan students something that has been proven to help them make healthy informed choices about their sexual and reproductive lives.

The solution already exists: comprehensive sexuality education.

To be comprehensive, sexuality education needs to be scientifically accurate, age-appropriate, nonjudgmental and gender-sensitive. The lessons should extend to prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), as well as contraception and unintended pregnancy. The students should also learn about values and interpersonal skills, gender, and sexual and reproductive rights. Programmes that cover all of these topics can have a positive impact on adolescents’ sexual and reproductive health.

Previous research shows that nationally more than a third of Kenyan teens between the ages of 15 and 19 have already had sex. About one-fifth are currently sexually active. And while only four in ten sexually active unmarried teenage girls use any modern method of contraception, the vast majority of them want to avoid pregnancy. About one-fifth of them are already mothers, and more than half of these births were unplanned.

Early childbearing may limit girls’ ability to stay enrolled in school and to develop the skills needed to successfully transition to adulthood. Knowledge about HIV infection also remains a concern: around half of adolescents in Kenya do not have comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS.

At a time when a new national school curriculum is starting its pilot phase, our recently released study provides critical evidence of the gaps in the content and delivery of existing sexuality education programmes and an opportunity for strengthening them.

The study, conducted in 2015 in 78 public and private schools, found that three out of four surveyed teachers are reportedly teaching all the topics that constitute a comprehensive sexuality education programme. Yet only 2% of the 2,484 sampled students said they learned about all the topics.

Worse still, incomplete and sometimes inaccurate information is being taught. A majority of surveyed teachers reported emphasising in their classes that abstinence is the best or only method to prevent pregnancy and STIs. Yet numerous studies have shown that abstinence-only programmes do not work.

Only 20% of students in our study had learned about types of contraceptive methods. And even fewer had learned how to use and where to access methods. The majority of teachers also reported very strongly emphasising that having sex is dangerous or immoral for young people. Furthermore, almost six in 10 teachers who teach about condoms incorrectly tell their students that condoms alone are not effective for pregnancy prevention. Something is wrong with this picture.

The reality is that at the time of being surveyed for our study, a quarter of the students – who were mostly aged between 15 and 17 – had already had sex. Students want and need information about how to prevent unintended pregnancies, HIV and other STIs.

Slow implementation

Kenya already has the policy infrastructure for a comprehensive programme. Its National School Health Policy was developed by the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation and their partners in 2009. The policy underscores the need to ensure that students receive quality health education, including sexuality education.

Kenya has also been a signatory since 2013 of a joint health and education ministerial commitment to provide comprehensive and rights-based sex education starting in primary school. Twenty-one other countries of East and Southern Africa are also part of this initiative.

However, implementation has been slow and uneven. Nairobi City county has acknowledged this gap and is working to increase coverage of sexuality education. Recently the county launched a plan of action to strengthen school health programming to increase the number of schools that offer comprehensive sexuality education.

Sexuality education is primarily taught under the subject Life Skills, which is compulsory but not examinable. Teachers face pressure to focus on examinable subjects, such as Mathematics and English. Even in schools that teach a wider range of sexuality education topics, many teachers lack the training to teach them effectively.

We owe it to young people

That’s why the ministries of Health and Education should honour their prior commitments. An immediate priority should be fostering partnerships between schools and community health care providers. Health care providers may be better placed to provide some particularly sensitive sexuality education content, such as where to access and how to use contraceptive methods.

As a longer term priority, the ministries should invest in improved pre-service and in-service teacher training in how to teach sexuality education effectively. They should also ensure that teachers have sufficient time to cover the full range of topics in their classes.

Increased focus on pregnancy and STI prevention strategies should cover a broad range of contraceptive methods and negotiation skills within relationships. This is necessary to ensure that all Kenyan youth have the knowledge to make informed decisions about their sexual and reproductive health. We owe it to young people to do much better.

Disclosure statement

The authors do not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and have disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond the academic appointment above.

Facts matter. Your tax-deductible donation helps deliver fact-based journalism.

Mugisha Traces His Journey to Becoming One of the Most Promising Cricket Stars

By Geoffrey Asiimwe

Cricket is one of the fastest growing sports disciplines in Rwanda. The sport was introduced in Rwanda after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

It was brought to Rwandans who grew up playing cricket in exile in neighbouring countries like Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania and returned to the land of their ancestors in the 90s.

In 1999, a small number of former exiles founded the Rwanda Cricket Association (RCA), before Rwanda became an Affiliate Member of the International Cricket Council in 2003.

The first cricket ground in Rwanda was set up on the site of the infamous massacre (during the Genocide) portrayed in the award-winning film, ‘Shooting Dogs’. Before a ball could be bowled, two-metre-high grass was cleared, revealing the remains of some of the Genocide victims.

This ground, which lies in the present-day Integrated Polytechnic Regional Centre-Kigali, or simply IPRC-Kigali, is still being used to date. At this ground, many Rwandan boys and girls have since discovered their previously hidden talents – in playing cricket. They include national team captain Eric Dusingizimana, who holds the Guinness World Record for the longest time spent batting in the net (51 hours).

There is also Cathia Uwamahoro, who holds the same record in the women category having batted for 26 hours. These two have been profiled in the past in these pages but in this issue, Saturday Sport profiles another young talent, Don de Dieu Mugisha.

At 21, the Kigali Cricket Club and Rwanda international has also played for other top local clubs.

Mugisha, an all-rounder, is a right-hand batter and nicknamed “Tricky” because of his famous tricky ‘Off Breaks’ bowling style.

Early days

Born September 7, 1996 in Bujumbura, Burundi to Joseph Gatabazi and Imelde Nijyimbere, Mugisha is the fourth child in the family of 10 – three girls and seven boys.

He attended Horizon Primary School in Kacyiru, a suburb in City of Kigali and later went to ETO-Kicukiro (which has since morphed into IPRC-Kigali) for secondary education and completed his Ordinary Level there before joining Lycee de Kigali for his Advanced Level education pursuing Mathematics, Chemistry and Biology (MCB).

He is now at University of Rwanda’s College of Science and Technology where he is pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in Creative Design.

He works part time at Digital Opportunity Trust (DOT) Rwanda as a facilitator in business development study.

Like many kids, Mugisha grew up playing football and was always obsessed with goalkeeping which he largely attributes to the sluggishness that characterised him as a young child.

“I liked football as a kid and my favourite position was goalkeeping, because I was not all that fit to run around the pitch as an outfield player,” he said.

Football remained his favourite sport until he joined secondary in 2006, when he discovered the ‘gentleman’s game’ (cricket).

As earlier indicated, at ETO-Kicukiro (now IPRC-Kigali) where he did his first half of secondary education from is the only place in Rwanda that had a cricket ground. It still is. A new state-of-the-art international stadium is currently under construction in Gahanga, Kicukiro District. It is set to be inaugurated in October.

“I found football very popular and we had about six football pitches but I couldn’t break in, so I decided to join the ‘very unpopular’ sport cricket,” Mugisha recalled.

“I saw cricket as a smart game, unlike football, in cricket, players were playing in uniform, most players were foreigners (mostly Indians) and because English was the medium of communication, I fell in love with cricket and decided to try it out.”

He added: “It wasn’t an easy start, and I remember getting my first bat as a gift from a certain white man in my senior three, which was a very big motivation.”

“I started training alone batting with small stones because I did have the balls, so one day I met this guy called Andrew Kayitera, who introduced to real cricket. He started training me, he taught me the basics and I picked up quickly,” he told Saturday Sport.

Fortunately, when he joined Lycee de Kigali in 2008, he found cricket among the games played at the school, and he continued from where he had left off.

Playing career

In 2009, Mugisha helped Lycee de Kigali to finish second in the inter-school tournament and, in 2010, they won the title.

In 2010, he got his first national team call-up to represent the country at the Africa U-19 Division Two tournament in Swaziland where Rwanda finished second runners up behind winners Nigeria and hosts Swaziland.

That same year, he was signed by Impala Titans cricket club where he played for one season before Dugout CC came calling the following season (2011) where he spent two seasons and won one Computer Point T20 title.

In 2013, Mugisha joined Right Guard CC and spent there one season before he was signed by Telugu Royals in 2014. In 2015, he returned to Right Guards until 2017 when he joined Kigali Cricket Club and led them to this season’s V.R NAIDU T20 title.

On the national duty, he was been a member of U-19 team since 2010 up to 2015. In 2011, Mugisha was part of the senior team that won the first African region qualifying tournament, ICC World T20, in Ghana.

In 2014, he was also part of the team that took part in U-19 World Cup qualifiers in Zambia where they finished runners up behind Tanzania.

Best and worst moments

He said: “My best moment was winning my first trophy in Ghana in 2011, seeing my country’s flag being raised in a foreign country was really emotional and very exciting.”

“My worst moment was in 2012, when we went to South Africa to play in the ICC Africa Division Two tournament and out of the five games, we managed just one win, it was really a disappointing moment.”

His plans for the future?

“I want to become one of the best crickets that Rwanda has ever produced and I believe it is possible now that in the next few months our new cricket stadium will be unveiled. The stadium will a good platform to show our talent. And when I grow a little older, I want to play golf.”

Appreciation, his captain’s take

He said: “My sincere appreciation goes to Andrew Kayitera, there is nothing I can pay him but he introduced to this game. Another person is Bob Songa, he is a very close friend of mine. And, last but not least, former RAC president Charles Haba, who has done a great job to develop the sport in Rwanda.”

His captain at the national team Eric Dusingizimana says of Mugisha: “He is really a fighter, he trains hard, he sets his own goal and very principled, he is a very good batsman and all-rounder and, if he maintains that, there is no doubt that he can go on to become one of the very best we have ever had in the country.”

Sexuality Education Failing Students

opinionBy Estelle Sidge And Mellisa Stillman

Imagine there is something you can give to Kenyan students to help them make healthy informed choices about their sexual and reproductive lives, including increased contraceptive use. It already exists:

Comprehensive sexuality education.

Our study of 78 secondary schools, conducted in 2015, found that although three out of four teachers say they teach all the topics that comprise a comprehensive sexuality education curriculum, only two per cent of the students say they learned this material. Something is wrong.

At a time when the revised national curriculum is about to be piloted by the government, the release of our new study assessing sexuality education policies, curricula, and their implementation in Nairobi, Homa Bay, and Mombasa counties provides evidence and an opportunity for policymakers and other decision makers to explore how best to strengthen the content and delivery of comprehensive sexuality education.

To have a positive impact on adolescents’ sexual and reproductive health, sexuality education needs to be age-appropriate, non-judgmental and gender-sensitive, and should include appropriate and scientifically accurate information on sexual and reproductive physiology; prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections; contraception and unintended pregnancy; values and interpersonal skills; and gender and sexual and reproductive rights. Kenya has the policy infrastructure in place.

QUALITY HEALTH EDUCATION

The National School Health Policy developed by the Ministries of Education and Public Health and Sanitation and their partners in 2009, underscores the need to ensure that students receive quality health education, including sexuality education.

In 2013, Kenya signed, along with 21 other countries in East and southern Africa, a joint health and education ministerial commitment to provide comprehensive and rights-based sexuality education starting in primary school.

However, the implementation has been slow and uneven. Nairobi City County has acknowledged this gap, and is working to increase coverage of sexuality education with the recent launch of its Plan of Action to Strengthen School Health Programming to increase the number of schools offering comprehensive sexuality education.

Sexuality education is primarily taught in Life Skills, which is compulsory but not examinable.

Teachers face pressure to focus on examinable subjects such as Mathematics and English. Even in the schools that teach a wider range of sexuality education topics, many teachers lack the training to effectively handle them.

INACCURATE INFORMATION

Worse, incomplete and sometimes inaccurate information is being taught. A majority of teachers reported emphasizing in their classes that abstinence is the best or only method to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.

Studies have shown that abstinence-only messages do not work.

Yet only 20 per cent of students had learned about contraception at all, and even fewer about how to use and where to access contraceptive methods.

The majority of teachers also reported very strongly emphasizing that having sex is dangerous or immoral for young people.

Almost six in 10 teachers incorrectly tell students that condoms alone are not effective for pregnancy prevention.

PREVENT PREGNANCIES

The reality is that at the time of being surveyed for our study, a quarter of the students–mostly aged 15 to 17–had already had sex. Students want–and need–information on how to prevent unintended pregnancies, HIV and other STIs.

That’s why we urge the Ministries of Health and Education, Science and Technology leaders to honour their prior commitments.

An immediate priority should be fostering partnerships between schools and community health care providers, who may be better positioned to provide some sexuality education content, particularly on sensitive issues such as how to use contraceptive methods and where to get them.

The ministries should invest in improved pre-service and in-service teacher training on how to teach sexuality education effectively, and ensure that they have sufficient time to cover the full range of topics in their classes.

Increased focus on pregnancy and STI prevention strategies that cover a broad range of contraceptive methods and negotiation skills in relationships is necessary to ensure that youth have the knowledge to make informed decisions about their sexual and reproductive health. We owe it to young people to do much better.

Ms Sidze is an associate research scientist with the Nairobi-based African Population and Health Research Centre and Ms Stillman, a research associate with the New York-based Guttmacher Institute

Form Six Student Invents Solar Powered Robot

Photo: Hazla Omar/Daily News

Form six student at Ilboru High School, Gracious Ephraim dispays his solar-powered human robot, which can walk, twist its head and speak at the Arusha-based school.

By Hazla Omar

Arusha — Arusha-based Ilboru High School’s Form Six student Gracious Ephraim has created a solar energy powered human Robot that can walk, turn its head, speak and perform a number of tasks.

Gracious who pursues Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics (PCM) combination said he started working on the prototype multitasking human robot about 12 months ago, using locally available materials as well as simple memory chips for the ‘brain’ The components include an entire Geometrical Set (aluminium box and contents), some wires, tin containers, wire pieces of metal and other materials, all valued at about 200,000/- , which he raised from his own pocket money.

The Robot can bend down to pick two packages and move with the load balanced onto its either arms for a while before laying them down neatly on the ground some distance away through remote programming. Teachers at the school said the student was the only person in the country to build a robot which makes various movements and actually works.

“I am trying to innovate things that can solve problems because for many years, science students in the country did not want to invent, they were all focusing on getting employed but being a scientist is all about devising and making new things.

Tanzania aims at industrialisation meaning that factories and other production lines must work 24 hours, but humans cannot work around the clock, so I envisage to have robots working at night and people during the day, this will also reduce the costs of paying workers overtime,” he pointed out.

The student added that, using robots is all about ensuring high level of effectiveness, revealing that his own maiden robot does things better than some people because when programmed to deposit an item at a particular place it does so with accuracy.

Gracious loves to watch movies like any boy next door, except that his flicks are those about robots, ‘Robocop,’ and ‘Transformers,’ from where he gets additional inspiration.

Regarding his own Robot’s capability to speak, Gracious said he had installed a memory card with recorded voice notes that can be remotely triggered to make the home-made machine reply to specific questions or even sing some songs.

The Head of Physics Department at Ilboru, Mr Pendaeli Daniel described Gracious as a standout student in the class.

“Always in time, and comes up with new things and ideas.We have written a special letter of introduction to enable him introduce his innovation to a number of factories and organisations, where he can learn more and find ways to innovate things to complement the robot operations,” said the teacher

Tanzania

18,000 Pupils ‘Cannot Read, Write or Solve Simple Math’

A total of 18,362 out of 379,000 pupils who sat their Standard 3 and 4 examinations in Simiyu last year showed they… Read more »

Tanzania: Form Six Student Invents Solar Powered Robot

Photo: Hazla Omar/Daily News

Form six student at Ilboru High School, Gracious Ephraim dispays his solar-powered human robot, which can walk, twist its head and speak at the Arusha-based school.

By Hazla Omar

Arusha — Arusha-based Ilboru High School’s Form Six student Gracious Ephraim has created a solar energy powered human Robot that can walk, turn its head, speak and perform a number of tasks.

Gracious who pursues Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics (PCM) combination said he started working on the prototype multitasking human robot about 12 months ago, using locally available materials as well as simple memory chips for the ‘brain’ The components include an entire Geometrical Set (aluminium box and contents), some wires, tin containers, wire pieces of metal and other materials, all valued at about 200,000/- , which he raised from his own pocket money.

The Robot can bend down to pick two packages and move with the load balanced onto its either arms for a while before laying them down neatly on the ground some distance away through remote programming. Teachers at the school said the student was the only person in the country to build a robot which makes various movements and actually works.

“I am trying to innovate things that can solve problems because for many years, science students in the country did not want to invent, they were all focusing on getting employed but being a scientist is all about devising and making new things.

Tanzania aims at industrialisation meaning that factories and other production lines must work 24 hours, but humans cannot work around the clock, so I envisage to have robots working at night and people during the day, this will also reduce the costs of paying workers overtime,” he pointed out.

The student added that, using robots is all about ensuring high level of effectiveness, revealing that his own maiden robot does things better than some people because when programmed to deposit an item at a particular place it does so with accuracy.

Gracious loves to watch movies like any boy next door, except that his flicks are those about robots, ‘Robocop,’ and ‘Transformers,’ from where he gets additional inspiration.

Regarding his own Robot’s capability to speak, Gracious said he had installed a memory card with recorded voice notes that can be remotely triggered to make the home-made machine reply to specific questions or even sing some songs.

The Head of Physics Department at Ilboru, Mr Pendaeli Daniel described Gracious as a standout student in the class.

“Always in time, and comes up with new things and ideas.We have written a special letter of introduction to enable him introduce his innovation to a number of factories and organisations, where he can learn more and find ways to innovate things to complement the robot operations,” said the teacher

Tanzania

18,000 Pupils ‘Cannot Read, Write or Solve Simple Math’

A total of 18,362 out of 379,000 pupils who sat their Standard 3 and 4 examinations in Simiyu last year showed they… Read more »

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