Posts tagged as: management

Environmental Impact of a Coal Plant On Coast Is Being Underplayed

Photo: Daily Nation

A worker loading coal.

analysisBy David Obura, the University of Queensland

China is transforming its sources of energy domestically in a bid to reverse decades of environmental pollution. But the switch to renewable energy has brought about a conundrum: what to do with the jobs and industries that have no future in this new system?

Export them. Several African countries are accepting the poisoned chalice of China’s subsidised development through the construction of outdated, dirty coal plants.

Kenya is one. Its coastline is a national asset for fisheries, tourism, a growing population and economic development. But Amu Coal – a consortium of Kenyan and Chinese energy and investment firms – is set to start building a coal plant on the only part that is untouched by industrial development. The plant is planned to be some 20 kilometres from the town of Lamu on the mainland coast, at the mouth of Dodori Creek.

Quite apart from the unfavourable economic and financing aspects for generating energy from coal, the plant may be Kenya’s single largest pollution source.

The problems should be set out in the Environment and Social Impact Assessment study required by Kenya’s Environment Act and vetted through the National Environment Management Authority. But three key issues are omitted or glossed over by the study. Any one of them should be cause for the environment authority, other arms of the Kenyan government and certainly the public to oppose the coal plant.

Thankfully, opposition is growing.

Key issues against plant

The first is a classic Industrial Revolution, Victorian issue. Toxic pollution. Coal releases a range of toxic substances into the environment. These go into the atmosphere, rain, groundwater, and seawater – and then to flora, fauna and people. These substances are barely mentioned in the assessment study. There are also no detailed estimates on the amounts that could be released and how they could be reduced by mitigating actions. The coal intended for use – initially to be imported from South Africa, and classified as “bituminous”, releases large amounts of toxins, particularly if improperly burned.

The impact study also doesn’t clearly state the full size of the mountain of coal residue left behind after burning – almost 4km long by 1km wide and 25 metres high. No credible plan for disposing of the waste is presented.

Second is Kenya’s contribution to global carbon dioxide emissions. Under the Paris Agreement on climate change the Jubilee government committed to reduce these by 30% by 2030. The impact study dismisses the carbon emissions from the plant as negligible on a global scale, at only 0.024% of global emissions. But what it attempts to hide is that the emissions of the coal plant alone will double Kenya’s energy sector’s entire CO2 emissions. This at the same time that citizens, businesses and the government are investing in efforts to reduce their carbon footprints, through – for example through wind, solar and geothermal power generation.

The third reason is a chimera of the above – climate change and toxic pollution combined. It is reasonably certain that sea levels will rise due to climate change. Estimates suggest this could be in the order of half to one metre by the end of this century, and very possibly more. The toxic waste mountain left by the plant will be on Kenya’s flattest shoreline, built on sand. Its base will be maybe 2-3 metres above sea level, and tens to 100m from the shoreline. This is the most vulnerable part of Kenya’s coast where sea level rises, and yet the massive toxic dump is to be placed there.

Part of the impact assessment argues that “the area is remote” so few people will be affected by pollution. Quite apart from the flawed logic that it’s okay to pollute natural wilderness areas, if plans for a major urban development under the LAPSSET project – Eastern Africa’s largest and most ambitious infrastructure project bringing together Kenya, Ethiopia and South Sudan – are concluded, there will be a city of over one million people in the area by 2050.

The report contains nothing about exposure of this number of people to toxic waste. Even the Strategic Environment Assessment for the LAPSSET project, conducted in the last few years, doesn’t include the coal plant in its assessment. The logic is that the plant is “not part of LAPSSET” yet even the simplest understanding of the purpose of both impact assessments and strategic environment assessments is to consider all interacting threats, and particularly the biggest ones, to the environment and people.

Improved standards are undoubtedly needed in Kenya’s Environment Impact Assessment sector. The country will develop, by hook or by crook, with or without a vision for 2030. Strengthening environment and social impact assessment as a tool to facilitate the right sort of development – where currently it’s viewed by business and most government authorities as a pesky bureaucratic step at best – will be one of the single most significant steps the government can take to protect and grow the natural and social assets that secure, healthy and equitable development is founded on.

Disclosure statement

David Obura is the Director of CORDIO (Coastal Oceans Research and Development – Indian Ocean) East Africa, a Kenyan non-profit research organisation that has operated in East Africa for nearly 2 decades.

Cabinet Approves Budget for Repeat Election

Photo: PSCU

A Cabinet meeting chaired by President Uhuru Kenyatta at State House, Nairobi on September 21, 2017.

By Justus Wanga

Cabinet on Thursday approved Sh10 billion budget to facilitate preparation for the repeat presidential election now slated for October 26.

The amount is less by about Sh2 billion given that the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) had requested for Sh12.2billion to preside over the polls following the nullification of President Uhuru Kenyatta’s win by the Supreme Court earlier in the month.

“Cabinet today approved an allocation of Sh10 billion to cover these repeat Presidential elections. This allocation was based on a proposed budget submitted by the electoral agency IEBC,” a dispatch by the State House Spokesperson Manoah Esipisu read.

SECURITY

IEBC on Thursday shifted the poll date from October 17.

Earlier, Treasury Cabinet Secretary Henry Rotich had projected that the election would cost more than Sh15 billion when ‘related activities, largely security measures, are factored in’.

Given that the repeat poll was not planned for at the beginning of the fiscal year starting June, some of the development projects earlier earmarked for completion will have to take a back seat as the supplementary budget is presented to the National Assembly on Tuesday for approval.

“Cabinet decided to reorganise planned expenditures for 2017/18 fiscal year, in line with Article 223 of the Constitution and Section 44 of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), 2012 in order to meet the obligations wrought by the new priorities,” Mr Manoah said.

TRANSITION

He said the president chaired the meeting, which was also attended by his Deputy William Ruto, and all Cabinet Secretaries, except CS Foreign Affairs Amina Mohamed, who is leading Kenya’s delegation to the United Nations General Assembly in New York.

The Cabinet at the same time approved a further Sh25 billion towards free secondary education starting January. This has been one of Mr Kenyatta’s campaign pledges which can only take effect should he win in the elections.

“Requisite infrastructure will be provided through government initiative that leads to 100 per cent transition from primary to secondary school,” his spokesman said.

Mr Manoah said in 2018, the Form One intake will cater for 1,003,552 learners sitting their Kenya Certificate of Primary Education this year.

IDPS

“Of this 903,200 will join public schools, while 100,322 will join private ones,” he added projecting an influx of learners in public schools.

On social protection, some Sh6.5 billion was also allocated to cover the enhanced Inua Jamii programme under, which Kenyans aged 70 and above are entitled to a monthly stipend.

The thorny matter of the Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) which has refused to fade away since the post-election violence of 2007/08 was also in the agenda with Sh1.9 billion being set aside to settle those still staying in camps.

Preparations for hosting the African Nations Championships (CHAN) also got a shot in the arm after a budget of Sh4.2 billion was also sanctioned.

Liberia: Bad Road Hampers Garbage Disposal, Says PCC

By Omari Jackson

The bad condition of the road leading to the landfill dump site in Wein Town, Bernard Farm in Paynesville, is affecting the regular collection and disposal of garbage, according to the Paynesville City Corporation (PCC).

This has led to garbage literally taking over the city of Paynesville, which could cause serious sanitation problems and health hazard if not attended to promptly, an official said.

Deputy site manager Suluteh Horace told journalists on Friday that reaching the site with their dump trucks has become difficult due to the awful condition of the road. As a result, their dump trucks are unable to reach the site to dispose of collected garbage, he said.

“This will cause problems for people within this environment because there is no way for our trucks to move forward with the dirt,” Horace said, and noted that as long as the rain continues, the road condition will continue to be deplorable and cause problems for the cities in Montserrado County, with Paynesville being no exception.

Several sanitation truck drivers interviewed also expressed concern over the deplorable condition of the road that is affecting their work. One of the drivers, identified only as Musa, told the Daily Observer: “We will not be able to collect dirt to take to the landfill site in Wein Town until the dry season because the road is too bad for the trucks to reach the site. Sometimes, when we take our trucks for dumping, it takes us the whole day to get there.”

Paynesville is one of the fastest growing cities in Liberia in terms of population, commercial activities and infrastructural development. But in recent times, garbage disposal has become a very serious problem and the Paynesville City Council is encountering difficulty managing waste, mainly due to the poor road condition.

PCC officials said although they have several measures to effectively manage waste in the city, the stockpile of garbage at key centers, including the densely populated Red Light community, has become a challenge.

They said while PCC dump trucks have been working overtime to ensure clean streets to enable residents to get better breathing space and do their trading in a clean environment, the end result has proven extremely difficult, as many trucks are finding it nearly impossible to dump their collection of garbage.

“While efforts are continuing to work around the situation,” an official said, “we need urgent intervention to ensure that the road to the landfill site in Wein Town is reconditioned to make the management of the garbage easier and healthy for all.”

Liberia

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Building Collapses in Kapsabet Town, Scores Feared Trapped

Photo: Bernabas Bii/Daily Nation

Rescue teams battle to save lives at the construction site in Kapsabet town, Nandi County, on September 21, 2017.

By Stella Cherono

A three-storey building under construction has collapsed in Kapsabet town, Nandi County.

The structure, located Kapsabet-Kisumu highway and said to be a hospital, came tumbling down during construction works at around 1pm on Thursday.

40 INJURED

At least sixty people are said to have been in the building at the time it caved in and came down.

The cause of the collapse is yet to be established.

Preliminary reports indicate 40 workers were injured and the whereabouts of 14 workers was yet to be known although some were suspected to be trapped under the rubble.

Kenya Red Cross workers and the police rushed the injured to The Kapsabet Referral Hospital.

“Rescue operation is on going. More updates to follow,” said Mr Mwachi Pius Masai, the communication officer of the National Disaster Management Unit.

4 MONTHS

Hundreds of villagers were battling to save lives using hoes and shovels by the time of going to press.

An earthmover was also on the site, scooping collapsed concrete and stones.

Heavy rains and lack of proper equipment are hampering rescue operations.

Police had a hectic moment controlling surging crowd that thronged the site.

It took over an hour before the county government and Public Works ministry officials arrived at the scene.

The construction started four months ago.

Developing story. More follows.

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Tanzania: Grief As Accident Victims Head for Burial

MINISTER of State in the President’s Office (Public Service Management and Good Governance), Angella Kairuki, was among hundreds of mourners who paid her last respect to 13 Tanzanians who died in a grisly road accident in Uganda early this week.

“The government has been saddened by this accident which claimed the lives of 13 family members, we extend our condolences to all those affected by the loss. The government wishes you a safe journey as you go to bury your loved ones,” Ms Kairuki said on behalf of the government.

Ms Kairuki extended the condolences on behalf of the government to the bereaved families and all Tanzanians at large. Other leaders present at the gathering included the Minister for Industry, Trade and Investment Charles Mwijage, his counterpart in the Justice and Constitutional Affairs’ docket Palamagamba Kabudi and Chief Secretary, Ambassador John Kijazi.

A sombre mood engulfed mourners who had gathered at the Lugalo General Military Hospital in Dar es Salaam to pay last respects for the deceased who were transported upcountry for burial yesterday.

Due to the huge number of people who turned up, only close relatives and government leaders were given an opportunity to pay their last respect. The 13 Tanzanians, who are family members of former Deputy Minister Gregory Teu, perished in a road accident when the vehicle they were travelling in, a Toyota Coaster with registration number T540 DLC, was hit by a lorry.

The family members were travelling from Uganda where they had gone to attend a wedding cer emony of Dr Teu’s daughter, Dr Annette Teu Ibingira to a Ugandan national, Dr Treasurer Ibingira. Dr Annette and her husband, Dr Treasurer and his relatives were present at the occasion as well as some government leaders from Uganda.

The bodies of the deceased were yesterday transported to Kilimanjaro, Arusha and Dodoma for burial ceremonies slated for today. Their remains were airlifted from Uganda to Tanzania on Monday and received by members of the Tanzania People’s Defence Forces (TPDF).

Tanzania

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Grief As Accident Victims Head for Burial

MINISTER of State in the President’s Office (Public Service Management and Good Governance), Angella Kairuki, was among hundreds of mourners who paid her last respect to 13 Tanzanians who died in a grisly road accident in Uganda early this week.

“The government has been saddened by this accident which claimed the lives of 13 family members, we extend our condolences to all those affected by the loss. The government wishes you a safe journey as you go to bury your loved ones,” Ms Kairuki said on behalf of the government.

Ms Kairuki extended the condolences on behalf of the government to the bereaved families and all Tanzanians at large. Other leaders present at the gathering included the Minister for Industry, Trade and Investment Charles Mwijage, his counterpart in the Justice and Constitutional Affairs’ docket Palamagamba Kabudi and Chief Secretary, Ambassador John Kijazi.

A sombre mood engulfed mourners who had gathered at the Lugalo General Military Hospital in Dar es Salaam to pay last respects for the deceased who were transported upcountry for burial yesterday.

Due to the huge number of people who turned up, only close relatives and government leaders were given an opportunity to pay their last respect. The 13 Tanzanians, who are family members of former Deputy Minister Gregory Teu, perished in a road accident when the vehicle they were travelling in, a Toyota Coaster with registration number T540 DLC, was hit by a lorry.

The family members were travelling from Uganda where they had gone to attend a wedding cer emony of Dr Teu’s daughter, Dr Annette Teu Ibingira to a Ugandan national, Dr Treasurer Ibingira. Dr Annette and her husband, Dr Treasurer and his relatives were present at the occasion as well as some government leaders from Uganda.

The bodies of the deceased were yesterday transported to Kilimanjaro, Arusha and Dodoma for burial ceremonies slated for today. Their remains were airlifted from Uganda to Tanzania on Monday and received by members of the Tanzania People’s Defence Forces (TPDF).

Tanzania

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Last Respects Paid to 13 Crash Victims

Photo: The Citizen

The Mass was celebrated at the Lugalo Hospital.

By John Namkwahe

Dar es Salaam — Hundreds of mourners on Wednesday were overcame with grief as they attended the Requiem Mass for the repose of the souls of 13 Tanzanians who perished in a road accident in Masaka, Uganda.

The Mass was celebrated at the Lugalo Hospital in the city.

The mourners comforted former deputy minister for Industry and Trade and Mpwapwa MP Gregory Teu, following the loss of his relatives.

Mr Teu, who was seated with his family members, including Dr Anneth Teu, who just wed in Uganda.

The 13 people perished on Sunday as they were returning home from Dr Anneth Teu’s wedding held last Saturday. Their mini-bus was involved in a head-on collision against a truck, 60 kilometres from Kampala and killed 13 people as six others sustained injuries.

Mr Teu, who lost his father, son, aunt and a sister in the road crash burst into tears, when he and his family members were directed to step forward to pay their last respects to their beloved ones.

One of the family members gave him a hand, when he had left his chair and stepped forward towards the decorated coffins.

It went from bad to worse when, Mr Teu’s daughter Margaret placed her head on the coffin bearing her grandfather’s body and let out a loud cry.

“I have no tears left in my eyes because I have cried so much,” she told The Citizen.

“I have had the toughest time and it is a very difficult time for our family. It’s a critical situation,” she added.

Addressing the mourners, the Minister of State in the President’s Office (Public Service Management and Good Governance), Ms Angellah Kairuki thanked the Ugandan government for transporting the bodies from Uganda to Tanzania on a private jet. Ms Kairuki also received 13 death certificates for those, who died in the road accident from the Ugandan government.

“On behalf of the Tanzanian government, I thank the Ugandan government under President Yoweri Museveni for the support during this difficult time. This is the true meaning of neighbourhood,” she noted.

For her part, Ugandan Bety Kamya, who represented President Museveni, stated: “We are very saddened and shocked by the deaths of our beloved ones. We will investigate the cause of the road accident,” she said.

The 13 bodies were yesterday transported to Mpwapwa in Dodoma and Moshi in Kilimanjaro for funeral procedures, according to family spokesman Evarist Soka.

Tanzania

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Tanzania: Last Respects Paid to 13 Crash Victims

Photo: The Citizen

The Mass was celebrated at the Lugalo Hospital.

By John Namkwahe

Dar es Salaam — Hundreds of mourners on Wednesday were overcame with grief as they attended the Requiem Mass for the repose of the souls of 13 Tanzanians who perished in a road accident in Masaka, Uganda.

The Mass was celebrated at the Lugalo Hospital in the city.

The mourners comforted former deputy minister for Industry and Trade and Mpwapwa MP Gregory Teu, following the loss of his relatives.

Mr Teu, who was seated with his family members, including Dr Anneth Teu, who just wed in Uganda.

The 13 people perished on Sunday as they were returning home from Dr Anneth Teu’s wedding held last Saturday. Their mini-bus was involved in a head-on collision against a truck, 60 kilometres from Kampala and killed 13 people as six others sustained injuries.

Mr Teu, who lost his father, son, aunt and a sister in the road crash burst into tears, when he and his family members were directed to step forward to pay their last respects to their beloved ones.

One of the family members gave him a hand, when he had left his chair and stepped forward towards the decorated coffins.

It went from bad to worse when, Mr Teu’s daughter Margaret placed her head on the coffin bearing her grandfather’s body and let out a loud cry.

“I have no tears left in my eyes because I have cried so much,” she told The Citizen.

“I have had the toughest time and it is a very difficult time for our family. It’s a critical situation,” she added.

Addressing the mourners, the Minister of State in the President’s Office (Public Service Management and Good Governance), Ms Angellah Kairuki thanked the Ugandan government for transporting the bodies from Uganda to Tanzania on a private jet. Ms Kairuki also received 13 death certificates for those, who died in the road accident from the Ugandan government.

“On behalf of the Tanzanian government, I thank the Ugandan government under President Yoweri Museveni for the support during this difficult time. This is the true meaning of neighbourhood,” she noted.

For her part, Ugandan Bety Kamya, who represented President Museveni, stated: “We are very saddened and shocked by the deaths of our beloved ones. We will investigate the cause of the road accident,” she said.

The 13 bodies were yesterday transported to Mpwapwa in Dodoma and Moshi in Kilimanjaro for funeral procedures, according to family spokesman Evarist Soka.

Tanzania

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Kenya: NTSA to Fine Applicants for Late Collection of Logbooks

By Ouma Wanzala

Kenyans who fail to collect their vehicle logbooks on time will now be charged Sh500 per month, National Transport and Safety Authority Director-General Francis Meja has said.

Mr Meja said the authority is working on how the fines will be paid before being rolled out.

The fine was to be effective from mid-September.

“We do not want to receive cash,” Mr Meja said, noting that the fines will be for the period the logbook will have stayed at their offices.

CULPRITS

The agency takes five working days to process logbooks and at the moment is holding more than 15,000 uncollected documents.

Nairobi County has the highest number of uncollected logbooks at 8,763, followed by Mombasa (5,998).

Some 228 and 130 logbooks are yet to be collected in Kisumu and Nyeri respectively.

NOTIFICATION

Mr Meja said some of the logbooks have been lying on the shelves for more than seven months.

“Applicants should move with speed and pick up their documents,” he added.

He said the agency had made efforts to contact the individuals via SMS and through their accounts on the Transport Integrated Management System but the customers had ignored all the communication.

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Fix Power Line Within 14 Days, Tanesco Ordered

By Abela Msikula

THE Deputy Minister for Energy and Minerals, Dr Medard Kalemani, has issued a 14-day ultimatum for completion of the Power transmission line at Gongo la Mboto on the outskirts of Dar es Salaam, as a part of Tanzania Energy Development and Access Expansion Project (TEDAP).

With sponsorship of over US 32 million dollars from the World Bank, TEDAP’s objective is to improve the quality and efficiency of electricity service supply and to establish a sustainable basis for energy access expansion, plus renewable energy development in the country.

The deputy minister said that the five-year project (2009 to 2013) was five years behind schedule, saying the contractor was responsible for the delay and thus liable to pay a 10 per cent penalty.

“The project cost was pegged to the dollar. It is obvious that there is a huge difference in currency exchange rates since 2009. The contractor must shoulder this burden.

At the same time, I am ordering for the transfer of the project supervisors because maladministration was the main cause of the delay and people are tired of frequent power cuts,” the visibly upset Dr Kalemani said.

Besides Gongo la Mboto, he also toured Mbagala, Kurasini and Kigamboni power distribution stations, which are similarly affected by project implementation delays, prompting him to issue separate five-day ultimatums for completion.

Over 12,000 clients are expected to benefit from power supply from the current 30,000 in Kigamboni, upon completion of expansions and installation of distribution lines. Apart from the major distribution plant at Kigamboni, the deputy minister also visited the site of its sub-transmission plant.

He expressed dismay over delays in embarking on construction activities, for which the government had already set aside 5bn/-.

However, Tanzania Electric Supply Company (Tanesco) Managing Director, Dr Tito Mwinuka, clarified, however, that work was being held back by pending permits, including one from the National Environment Management Council.

Kigamboni District Commissioner (DC) Hashim Mgandilwa and Member of Parliament (MP) Faustine Ndungulile voiced complaints over frequent power interruptions averaging three a day. “Power cuts constitute one of the reasons behind stagnation of economic and development activities in this district.

It is really demoralising,” said the MP. On a positive note, however, both praised Tanesco for power connection for service seekers within seven days.

Tanzania

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