Posts tagged as: high

City of Kigali Supports Women Cooperatives

By Olivia Muragijimana

City of Kigali has offered Rwf30 million financial support to 12 women cooperatives, four from each of the city’s three districts, to boost their businesses which have been struggling.

The grant beneficiaries are farming and tailoring cooperatives as well as smallholder businesses operating in the City of Kigali.

Each of the 12 cooperatives was given Rwf2.8 million at a public function on Tuesday.

Aurore Umuhoza, the National Women Council coordinator in the City of Kigali, said: “Most of the cooperatives need support but in each district we only chose four cooperatives. We considered the cooperatives that have all the requirements of Rwanda Cooperatives Agency, have at least spent one year operating as well as those with capital of at least Rwf50,000 of their own and ability to continue work so that this capital we added them is not wasted.”

“Many of the cooperatives were folding, which would lead their members to go back to street vending since most of them were previously street vendors. We hope that this support will propel them to self-reliance and reduce street children since most of these street children come from such families.”

Marie Chantal Musanabera, head of Gikondo-based bakery cooperative called ‘Twiyubake Twihesha Agaciro’, said their cooperative was started by young women who had dropped out of high school.

“We had an idea of running a bakery business but we didn’t have enough money. Now it’s a dream come true as this support is a great boost,” she told The New Times.

Languid Nyirabahire, Gasabo vice mayor in charge of social affairs, said the grant is part of efforts to solve the problem street vending.

Rwanda

Govt Expects Over 12000 Returnees By July 2018

At least12,000 Rwandans who still live in foreign countries as refugees could return home between July and June next… Read more »

Hypertension Kills, Know Your Blood Pressure Readings Today – Experts

By Syriacus Buguzi

Dar es Salaam — It is World Hypertension Day (WHD) today and people are called upon to know their blood pressure readings.

On this day, themed: “Know Your Numbers,” international health agencies want Hypertension to be taken seriously to avert serious health consequences emanating from the silent condition.

One is said to have high blood pressure if one’s blood pressure readings are above 120/80 on the blood pressure machine.

World Health Organization (WHO) figures show that only around half of those, who die due to hypertension, knew they had the condition.

In Tanzania the prevalence of hypertension is 26 percent, meaning that in every 100 people, 26 have the condition, data from the Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children show.

Every year 10 million people around the world die needlessly because of high blood pressure, making it the planet’s single biggest killer, says the International Society of Hypertension.

People with hypertension suffer a stroke, may have a heart attack, or die from another complication such as Kidney Failure, experts warn.

According to Dr Fredrick Haraka, a research scientist at the Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), hypersntion can be curbed through behavioral change.

“Increased intake of fruits and green vegetables, salt intake not exceeding 5g per day, engaging into physical activities and observing the recommended alcohol intake of 21 units per week for men and 14 units per week for women must be emphasized.”

Tanzania

States Split On Funding Mechanisms to Bail Out EAC

East African Community (EAC) partner states are divided on the proposed financing mechanisms to bail out the… Read more »

Court Condemns Law Council Over Lawyer Enrolment

By Anthony Wesaka

Kampala — The High Court in Kampala has criticised the Law Council for refusing for two years to respond to an application by a lawyer who had sought a certificate of enrolment to practise his profession.

In his judgment, Justice Stephen Musota, ruled that it was unfair for the Law Council to keep Mr Tony Katungi in the dark for more than two years without informing him of its decision regarding his application for enrollment as an advocate.

The Law Council is a government body charged with overall regulatory authority for the entire legal profession in Uganda.

In his suit against the Law Council, Mr Katungi said he had fulfilled all the requirements under the Advocates Act, including being under supervision of a competent law firm, but he had never been issued a certificate of eligibility for enrolment as a High Court advocate.

Mr Katungi holds a Bachelor of Laws degree from Uganda Christian University in Mukono and a post-graduate diploma from Kenya School of Law and one-year practising experience in Kenya.

In Uganda, lawyers who have studied outside the country can only practise law here after undergoing close supervision by a law firm approved by the Law Council.

Justice Musota ordered the Law Council to respond to Mr Katungi’s application for enrolment.

Uganda

Tanzania Denies Prying in Kenya’s Politics Ahead of August Elections

The government yesterday rubbished reports by some Kenyan media that Tanzania is prying in Kenyan politics ahead of the… Read more »

Joy, Tears Characterise Police Recruitment

By Joseph Muraya

Nairobi — The police recruitment drive attracted tens of thousands of youths despite the exercise only targeting 10,000 people.

It was an exercise characterised by excitement and disappointments for those who did not make it to the final list, like some of those who spoke to Capital FM News at the Nyayo Stadium recruitment centre.

“I am completely tired and I am not trying again… what is a certificate of good conduct to stop me from serving the country?” one of the youths asked, visibly fatigued by the vetting and what the future holds for him asked.

“This is my fourth time. Last time they told me I was short, I have now gained height but I don’t have a certificate of good conduct.”

For others, they might not have been picked but they were optimistic that next time they will be lucky.

Grace Akinyi failed the test because she could not close one of her eyes while the other one is still opened.

“I feel heartbroken that such a reason has stopped me from joining my dream job,” a teary Akinyi told Capital FM News.

It was her fourth time as well but in her case, she is not giving up.

With the high unemployment rate in the country among the youth, some were escorted by parents who only watched at a distance as they went through the vetting, some whispering a prayer to God, for their son or daughters to be admitted.

“I have tried to take my son to a teachers college but he just wants to join the police service,” one of the parents said.

“It is passion and it seems he will be picked.”

Kenya Police spokesperson Charles Owino said the process was not marred by many incidents saying other than medical and physical requirements, they also ensured that regional balance was considered.

He said the exercise was transparent.

Kenya

EU Opts for Dialogue As Region Ignores Signing Trade Deal

European Union (EU) has invited the government to a dialogue over the contentious Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA). Read more »

Farmers Decry High Profits of Processors

By Nation Team

Ms Anna Njiraini sells a kilo of her milk to the local processor for Sh37.

If she is travelling and she needs to buy packed milk, this amount will fetch her a tiny 200 ml packet which goes for Sh35 at the supermarket in Ol Kalau, her shopping centre.

To afford 500ml of New KCC-processed milk, she will have to sell more than two litres of raw milk as the packet goes for Sh80.

The profits earned by processors are bigger, considering that they make more products such as ghee, cheese and confectionaries from the same milk.

The huge discrepancy has kicked up a storm in social media and other forums with Kenyans wondering how petrol could be way cheaper than milk which is bought locally and cheaply from local farmers.

A litre of petrol currently retails at an average of Sh95.

Our survey found a similar discrepancy on the prices of dry maize and flour sold in supermarkets.

The spot check across the country found farmers who have not benefitted from the price surge.

They blamed a conspiracy between processors and the failure by authorities to control prices.

‘MILLERS CONSPIRE’

“Markets are unpredictable. Millers conspire on the prices to offer to suppliers which finally gets back to the farmer. The conspiracy is made easier by the fact that we have very few millers in Kenya, yet the government has done nothing to standardise the market,” says Robbert Macharia.

High cost of animal feeds has further diminished dairy farmers’ profits.

“A bale of hay that was going for Sh200 and 300 is now selling at between Sh350 and 400,” says Mr Bernard Njoroge, a dairy farmer from Boiman in Nyandarua County.

He says most farmers sold their potatoes between February and March, selling a 100kg bag at Sh2,000, whose market value is now Sh6,000.

In Nyandarua, potato reserved as seeds to plant this season is selling at Sh8,400, yet its the same potato harvested between February and March this year.

“We can’t blame the drought for increased potato prices. I have a small farm at Wanjohi area where I grow potato under irrigation. But the brokers are still exploiting farmers buying a bag at Sh2,500,” says Ms Njiraini.

‘BENEFIT US’

Farmers in Molo are selling a 100kg sack of potatoes at Sh7,000 to traders who then sell it at Sh9,000 in the market.

“The prices would benefit us if the rains did not delay because then production would be 100 per cent,” Mr Peter Kimani, a resident told Nation.

According to Nixon Sigey, the New KCC chief executive, low supply occasioned by prolonged drought, was responsible for pushing the prices up.

“What we are witnessing is the most severe drought in the recent past. This has resulted in the drop of milk supply by half,” he said.

Mr Sigey noted that the processors had been forced to increase the producer prices to cushion farmers against the high cost of production due to feeds and water scarcity.

He said Brookside and New KCC increased farmer’s commodity buying prices to Sh42 and Sh43 respectively.

“But with the onset of rains, we expect market prices to stabilise. Consumers need to be optimistic that the prices will come down soon,” he said.

Dr Martins Odendo, a principal economist at the Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organisation, said the high prices that processors peg on their products are attributed to the various expenses incurred in the value chain.

Report by Brian Okinda, Waikwa Maina, Steve Njuguna, Reitz Mureithi, Stanley Kimuge and Brenda Gamonde.

Nigeria: Chamber of Shipping Embarks On Local Content Enforcement

By Gloria Ehiaghe

As part of efforts to correct the imbalances in local participation in the country, the Nigerian Chamber of Shipping (NCS), has vowed to engage the Nigerian Content Development and Monitoring Board (NCDMB), and other relevant government agencies to stage a sustained advocacy to address the challenges mitigating local content enforcement.

The newly elected President of NCS, Andrew Isichei, stated this during the inauguration of the Governing Council, and his investiture as the sixth president of the body.

Records showed that 85 per cent of vessels operating in the Nigerian market are owned by foreigners, and a reasonable quantum of the balance 15 per cent is also owned by foreign interests, who merely incorporated their companies in Nigeria and crew and staff are mainly foreign-dominated.

Against this backdrop, Isichei noted that plans are underway to borrow a leaf from the Angolan model of local content enforcement to tackle the issue of unemployment especially for Nigerian seafarers are who are yet to garner freight experiences onboard vessels.

Disclosing the focus and roadmap for the chamber, he promised to ensure full implementation of the Cabotage Act, adding that the accumulated Cabotage Vessel Financing Fund (CVFF), would be deployed and disbursed to serious minded practitioners.

Isichei said: “On the issue of ship finance, businesses come but if you do have ship you cannot do that. Without fund we cannot afford ship, we have the CVFF accumulating and not being deployed, we will engage, talk and push to see how these monies that have accumulated will be disbursed to very serious minded practitioners. Just like cabotage, the issue is not just penalising and making money. The objective is not to make money; the objective is for it to impact positively, for there to be engagement and skill. These are the issues we need to deal with”.

No matter the mistakes that have been made in the past on the usage on disbursement of the funds, there is a time we need to drop the past behind and move forward. There is a lot to be done.”

He further said: “There are several conventions and policies, which though have been ratified but are not been domesticated or fully implemented by Nigeria.

In his valedictory speech, the outgone President of the NCS, Adebayo Sarumi, who commended the Governing Council in bringing in expertise to solving issues in the shipping trade, called on relevant government agencies and those in shipping business to support the chamber and also take advantage of all it has to offer.

Corroborating Isichei’s quest for the country to own training vessels for cadets, Vice President of the NCS, Tijani Ramalan, told the gathering that the high cost of training over 2000 seafarers overseas by NIMASA is quite enormous.

Tecno Awards Best Distributors

By John Mbaraga

The Kigali-based TECNO’s Smartphone distributor, Justine Mbabazi, has been awarded with a car worth Rwf10 million as recognition for her efforts and campaign that attracted many clients to buy the company’s products.

“I’m thankful that the company thought of sharing with and recognizing our efforts. My uniqueness that might have won me this car was that I understood well the TECNO company’s operations and convinced many clients to buy the phones,” Mbabazi happily enthuses.

The awarding ceremony took place on Friday, downtown Kigali when more than thirty distributers awarded with a variety of prizes including; refrigerators, washing machines, cash prizes, Luxury China tour, flat TV screens and other household materials among others.

For Mbabazi, the award is a beginning of her journey into phone dealership, ” When the company brings new brands on the market, we take a lead in sensitizing the community to buy them, so as I started getting profit from what I did, I can say that we are to intensify the efforts by investing in product campaign programs,” she told the media.

Another distributor, Noel Mucyo has been awarded with flat screen and Rwf1,000,000. Mucyo said his being among the best distributors is attributed to the high quality of the company’s products that have been fully admired and embraced by the clients.

“This is because I delivered their message as it was. We were trained about functioning of these phones and encouraged clients to buy them. So this of giving back to distributors gives us much more strength,” he told journalists.

Aimable Ngendahayo, TECNO Rwanda’s Country Director said the company organised the event as a gesture of recognition of the distributors’ role in its development.

“This is an encouragement to keep them distributing bigger volumes to the users. When they sell many phones, the company gains much profit and keeps developing as well as bringing new phones with up-to-date technology on the market,” he said.

According to Ngendahayo, nine million people in Rwanda use TECNO mobile phones and more than 150,000 buy TECNO phones monthly.

Ngendahayo said currently, TECNO has three hundred and forty-five shops from across the country among them forty-five are VIP shops.

The awarding ceremony was combined with the ongoing promotion of TECNO’s new brand phone ‘CAMON CX’

Rwanda

Govt Recalls University of Rwanda Draft Law

The government has withdrawn from Parliament the draft law establishing the University of Rwanda (UR) and determining… Read more »

Lissu’s Absence Puts Wassira’s Election Loss Appeal On Hold

Yesterday’s Court of Appeal session that was meant to hear an appeal challenging Ester Bulaya’s election as Bunda Urban legislator in the 2015 constituency elections on a Chadema ticket, was postponed to Thursday, due to the absence of her advocate, Mr Tundu Lissu.

The panel- comprising Justices Mbarouk Mbarouk, Augustine Mwarija and Rehema Mkuye ‑ was told that the counsel had not been served with summons.

Advocates for the appellants ‑ Constantine Mutalemwa and Yasin Memba – were in the chamber, as was the election loser, former Minister for Agriculture, Food Security and Co-operatives Stephen Wassira.

The appellants are Magambo Masato, Matwige Matwige, James Ezekiel and Elieta Malagiki.

Mr Wassira rejected election results announced by returning officer Lucy Msofe, under which Ms Bulaya was declared victor after polling 28,510 votes, against Mr Wassira’s 19,126.

Among other alleged irregularities, Mr Wassira claimed that, the results that were announced in various polling stations did not reflect the actual number of registered voters, and that rowdy crowds linked to opposition parties blocked his supporters from casting their ballots.

The four CCM members on Mr Wassira’s side had initially petitioned against the election results in the High Court. They lost the case and decided to seek redress in the higher court.

Tanzania

Country Mourns 32 Pupils Who Died in a Bus Crash

The coldness of Arusha, with which the residents of this city have been long accustomed at this time of year, was… Read more »

The Fascinating Health Benefits of Tree Tomatoes

opinionBy Lydia Atieno

Tamarillo or tree tomatoes, locally known as ‘ibinyomoro’ are fruits loved by people of all age groups. And while it is common to spot different types of juices in many restaurants, one can rarely miss a glass of ibinyomoro juice.

A part from one taking them as juice, nutritionists say the natural fruit has more health benefits, which makes it a key fruit to include on one’s menu.

Rene Tabaro, a nutritionist and dietician at King Faisal Hospital, Kigali, says that the fruit is healthy and daily intake can work wonders when it comes to improving one’s weight.

“For those who are struggling to maintain a good and healthy weight, raw and fresh tree tomato a day will aid in that. The juice in the fruit acts as a detoxifier as its acidic properties aid in cutting down fat,” he says.

Tree tomatoes are also rich in vitamins and mineral salts. They also contain iron and potassium.

Tabaro explains that the presence of potassium helps in balancing the harmful effects of high sodium levels in the heart. The presence of irons is vital for forming red blood cells to transport oxygen throughout the body, as well as generating energy from the food one eats.

Apart from just being a loved fruit, Joseph Uwiragiye, the head of nutrition department at University Teaching Hospital, Kigali (CHUK), says the fruit is also abundant in vitamin C which plays a big role in fighting diseases.

“Vitamin C increases the absorption of iron found in fruits. It is also important in making new cells and clearing free radicals from the blood, which might damage the cells,” he adds.

Uwiragiye points out that vitamin C also plays a big role in healing of wounds, as well as repairing and maintaining bones and teeth.

Vitamin C also helps in repair of tissues in all parts of the body, he says.

“Antioxidants contained in the fruit help in fighting free radicals and prevent some diseases such as cancer, anaemia and hypertension, among others, says Uwiragiye.

Consuming the fruit will also ensure that the skin stays healthy and glowing all the time. He explains that this is due to the presence of vitamin A in it.

“The fruit contains anthocyanin and flavonids which protect the skin from oxidative stress and also aid in anti-aging.

Cabohydrates, protein, fat calcium, copper and zinc are just some of the other vitamins that tree tomato contains. All these can help in improving the immune system, according to Uwiragiye.

Eric Musengimana, a nutrition and diabetic specialist at Diet Therapy Company in Remera, Kigali, says the fruit is also known to control diabetes.

Tamarillo contains chlorogenic acid that is responsible in helping reduce the level of blood sugar, especially in people with type II diabetes mellitus.

“The antioxidant helps to lessen the oxidative stress in the liver and pancreas. Consuming the fruit on a light stomach will ensure better results,” he says.

In cases of inflamed tonsils, Musengimana says consumption of this fruit ensures its cure.

In some situations, the inflamed tonsil can be relieved of pain by just warming the plant’s leaves and wrapping them around the neck.

Further, high blood pressure can also be controlled with consumption of tamarillo, according to Musengimana.

“When you want to lower the high pressure levels, high intake of the fruit ensures that. This is because it possesses potassium and minerals that help to maintain normal blood pressure,” he adds.

The fruit can also be good for the heart, according to Tabaro. He explains that this is due to the presence of potassium, which assists in balancing the harmful response of high sodium levels in the heart.

He also notes that due to the presence of magnesium in it, it assists in the proper functioning of the cardiovascular system.

Uwiragiye says that because of its high content of fiber, it helps to eliminate the absorption of bad cholesterols in the body.

“It can also lower chances of stroke as well as oxidative stress. This is because of antioxidant properties found in the fruit,” he says, adding that it contains vitamin A which helps to restore the eye membrane’s moisture which acts as an obstacle to viruses and bacteria.

Uwiragiye says consuming the fruit prevents one from eye infections and eye disorders such as macular degeneration and cataract.

Rwanda: The Fascinating Health Benefits of Tree Tomatoes

opinionBy Lydia Atieno

Tamarillo or tree tomatoes, locally known as ‘ibinyomoro’ are fruits loved by people of all age groups. And while it is common to spot different types of juices in many restaurants, one can rarely miss a glass of ibinyomoro juice.

A part from one taking them as juice, nutritionists say the natural fruit has more health benefits, which makes it a key fruit to include on one’s menu.

Rene Tabaro, a nutritionist and dietician at King Faisal Hospital, Kigali, says that the fruit is healthy and daily intake can work wonders when it comes to improving one’s weight.

“For those who are struggling to maintain a good and healthy weight, raw and fresh tree tomato a day will aid in that. The juice in the fruit acts as a detoxifier as its acidic properties aid in cutting down fat,” he says.

Tree tomatoes are also rich in vitamins and mineral salts. They also contain iron and potassium.

Tabaro explains that the presence of potassium helps in balancing the harmful effects of high sodium levels in the heart. The presence of irons is vital for forming red blood cells to transport oxygen throughout the body, as well as generating energy from the food one eats.

Apart from just being a loved fruit, Joseph Uwiragiye, the head of nutrition department at University Teaching Hospital, Kigali (CHUK), says the fruit is also abundant in vitamin C which plays a big role in fighting diseases.

“Vitamin C increases the absorption of iron found in fruits. It is also important in making new cells and clearing free radicals from the blood, which might damage the cells,” he adds.

Uwiragiye points out that vitamin C also plays a big role in healing of wounds, as well as repairing and maintaining bones and teeth.

Vitamin C also helps in repair of tissues in all parts of the body, he says.

“Antioxidants contained in the fruit help in fighting free radicals and prevent some diseases such as cancer, anaemia and hypertension, among others, says Uwiragiye.

Consuming the fruit will also ensure that the skin stays healthy and glowing all the time. He explains that this is due to the presence of vitamin A in it.

“The fruit contains anthocyanin and flavonids which protect the skin from oxidative stress and also aid in anti-aging.

Cabohydrates, protein, fat calcium, copper and zinc are just some of the other vitamins that tree tomato contains. All these can help in improving the immune system, according to Uwiragiye.

Eric Musengimana, a nutrition and diabetic specialist at Diet Therapy Company in Remera, Kigali, says the fruit is also known to control diabetes.

Tamarillo contains chlorogenic acid that is responsible in helping reduce the level of blood sugar, especially in people with type II diabetes mellitus.

“The antioxidant helps to lessen the oxidative stress in the liver and pancreas. Consuming the fruit on a light stomach will ensure better results,” he says.

In cases of inflamed tonsils, Musengimana says consumption of this fruit ensures its cure.

In some situations, the inflamed tonsil can be relieved of pain by just warming the plant’s leaves and wrapping them around the neck.

Further, high blood pressure can also be controlled with consumption of tamarillo, according to Musengimana.

“When you want to lower the high pressure levels, high intake of the fruit ensures that. This is because it possesses potassium and minerals that help to maintain normal blood pressure,” he adds.

The fruit can also be good for the heart, according to Tabaro. He explains that this is due to the presence of potassium, which assists in balancing the harmful response of high sodium levels in the heart.

He also notes that due to the presence of magnesium in it, it assists in the proper functioning of the cardiovascular system.

Uwiragiye says that because of its high content of fiber, it helps to eliminate the absorption of bad cholesterols in the body.

“It can also lower chances of stroke as well as oxidative stress. This is because of antioxidant properties found in the fruit,” he says, adding that it contains vitamin A which helps to restore the eye membrane’s moisture which acts as an obstacle to viruses and bacteria.

Uwiragiye says consuming the fruit prevents one from eye infections and eye disorders such as macular degeneration and cataract.

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