Posts tagged as: general

Capital Development Authority ‘Outlived Its Purpose’

Photo: Daily News

Capital Development Authority building.

By Alvar Mwakyusa

Former Speaker of the National Assembly, Pius Msekwa has joined an array of patrons supporting dissolution of the Capital Development Authority (CDA), stressing that the purpose for its establishment in 1973 had long gone.

“CDA was formed to serve its purpose at that time. Things have changed and we need to move with time. Its dissolution is a significant step towards development,” the senior citizen remarked in response to an inquiry by ‘Daily News’ on the disbandment.

Mr Msekwa hailed President John Magufuli for the bold move to disband the authority, remarking further that; “every generation must write its own book.”

In a previous interview with this paper last year, the former Speaker revealed how he and other leaders at that time played an instrumental role in establishing CDA, to foster the transfer of the capital city from Dar es Salaam to Dodoma.

“I remember attending a meeting chaired by the then President, Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, which agreed on forming an entity that would spearhead the transfer and it came out to be CDA,” he said then, during the interview at his home.

And, in another interview towards the end of last year, former Prime Minister Cleopa Msuya recalled how the government was determined to shift its seat to the central region.

“The late George Kahama was the first Director General of CDA and he is the one who developed the master plan for Dodoma,” the former PM explained.

In a related development, the chair of a taskforce formed by Dodoma Regional Commissioner, Jordan Rugimbana to work on grievances of residents against the now defunct CDA, Mr Aron Kinunda, echoed the views by Mr Msekwa, noting that the objectives for its formation had been met.

“The dissolution of CDA, by President Magufuli, is a good step for the development of Dodoma; it is now apparent that land conflicts arising from differing legislations covering CDA on one hand and Dodoma Municipal Council on the other, will be no more,” he explained.

According to Mr Kinunda, residents in the designated capital received the news with a sigh of relief, since the authority had turned out to be “a menace to the society.”

Tanzania

Increased Budget Allocation to Push Govt Industrial Drive

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New Device Touted As Anti-Malaria Weapon

Kibaha — The government has been advised to supplement district and municipal council budgets, to enable them buy biolarvacides, the latest and effective to deal with malaria- before it occurs.

The Tanzania Biotech Products Ltd Acting General Manager, Mr Samuel Mziray, said here yesterday that the government could save a lot of money currently spent on battling malaria, if the councils were empowered to buy biolarvacides that kill mosquito larvae instead.

He cited lack of political will as a spoiler, noting that so much money was spent on buying medicines and nets, while the problem could be tackled more effectively by destroying mosquito larvae breeding grounds.

Mr Mziray said only Geita and Mbogwe district councils had bought biolarvacides in compliance with a government circular channeled through the regional administration and local government authorities last year.

He lamented that the ‘charity begins at home’ maxim was undermined, noting that the company, which is capable of producing more than 60 million litres a year, had exported 92,000 litres to Niger, and discussions to deliver supplies to Serbia, Sri Lanka and Cuba were at an advanced stage.

Mr Mziray pointed out that the charity Doctors Without Borders had since started using biolarvacide products in refugee camps.

The company’s Acting Commercial Manager, Mr Frank Mzindakaya, remarked that the products had proved to be highly effective, environment- friendly and easy to apply.

Besides controlling malaria, they were also effective in tackling viral infections like dengue, yellow fever and Nile fever.

Tanzania

Increased Budget Allocation to Push Govt Industrial Drive

The Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment has doubled development budget in the 2017/18 financial year, pushing the… Read more »

Tanzania Inks Cassava Export Deal to China

By Theopista Nsanzugwanko

Beijing — Tanzania has secured a cassava exporting deal to China for unlimited amount, thanks to an agreement signed in Beijing yesterday after the end of Belt and Road Forum.

Tanzania Ambassador to China, Mbelwa Kairuki signed for Dar es Salaam while Beijing was represented by Deputy Head of China’s General Rights of Quality, Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine, Li Yuanping.

Ambassador Kairuki said to boost the country’s cassava production, the embassy in Beijing started to shop around for technology to increase its output. “This is a special day for cassava farmers back home. My message is grab this opportunity by increasing production since a steady market has been secured,” he said.

According to Amb Kairuki, the country currently produce between half a tonne and two tonnes per hectare compared to China which produces between 15 and 25 tonnes per hectare.

He urged Tanzanian to establish cassava processing facilities in a bid to seize the opportunity fully while adhering to export safety and standards stipulated in the agreement. Dar assured Beijing on standard as per agreed on the cassava deal with its negotiations started almost four years ago.

Mr Li Yuanping said the agreement was part of implementing One Belt and One Road initiative centred on promoting long-term cooperation between the two countries. “China market is also open to other agricultural products from Tanzania to help create jobs and growth,” he said.

The tuber cassava is dried and processed to form chips, cubes, peeler, starch and flour and pellets before being exported.

The processed cassava serves as industrial raw material for the production of adhesives bakery products, dextrin, dextrose glucose, lactose and sucrose. Dextrin is used as a binding agent in the paper and packing industry and adhesive in cardboard, plywood and veneer binding.

Food and beverage industries use cassava products derivatives in the production of jelly caramel and chewing gum; pharmaceutical and chemical industries also use cassava alcohol (ethanol) in the production of cosmetics and drugs.

Cassava is a major subsistence crop, after maize, especially in the country’s semi-arid areas where, due to its drought tolerance, cassava is sometimes considered a famine reserve when cereals fail.

Most of the cassava in the country 84 per cent is for human consumption, and the remainder is used for animal feed, alcohol brewing, and starch production.

Tanzania

Increased Budget Allocation to Push Govt Industrial Drive

The Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment has doubled development budget in the 2017/18 financial year, pushing the… Read more »

How Well Has the Fairtrade Movement Done?

columnBy Junior Sabena Mutabazi

Today, in London, like in many other parts of the West, if you want to top up on polyphenolic antioxidants or simply add some Vitamin C in your body, Fairtrade products such as fresh coffee and fresh bananas are some of the products widely available on the market to cater to your needs.

In fact, the UK is the world’s largest Fairtrade market, with more products and more awareness of Fairtrade than anywhere else. Indeed, Fairtrade sales in 2012 alone were in excess of £1.53 billion.

But what is the Fairtrade movement about, and has the movement achieved its main objectives over the last two decades?

According to the Fairtrade Foundation, Fairtrade is a concept primarily about better prices, decent working conditions, local sustainability, and fair terms of trade for farmers and workers in the developing world.

The Fairtrade standards requires companies to pay sustainable prices (never to fall lower than the market price) in order to address some of the injustices of conventional trade, which traditionally discriminates against the poorest, weakest producers from predominantly poor countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

When a company’s product such as coffee, sugar or banana has been awarded a Fairtrade mark, it means that that specific product meets the international Fairtrade standards, and it also shows that the product has been certified to offer a better deal to the farmers and workers in developing countries involved in producing it.

In essence, when compared to similar unmarked products on the market, a Fairtrade marked product has a premium price attached to it, which makes it relatively more expensive.

This premium price is an additional sum of money paid on top of the Fairtrade minimum price that farmers and workers invest in social, environmental and economic developmental projects to improve their businesses and their communities.

Farmers and workers themselves decide how that premium is spent.

Additionally, over the years, the number of groups of farmers and workers who have benefited from UK Fairtrade has increased to include farmers from over 60 countries across Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America.

Equally, country reports such as the Fairtrade in Malawi report indicates that certified sugar farmers and their communities have experienced tangible and significant economic, social, and organisational benefits from Fairtrade.

Indeed, according to Malawi Fairtrade Network Chairperson, Doreen Chanje, Fairtrade has “gradually enabled farmers’ standards of living to improve with a higher proportion of certified farmers now able to pay school fees for their children, ensure household food security, increase their assets and experience more stability in incomes”.

Likewise, the number of Fairtrade certified producer organisations supplying the UK market rose by 56 percent from 428 in 2008 to 669 at the end of 2012. Also, as of 2012, 40 percent of the retail sugar market, 30 percent of banana market and 28 percent of coffee market are all Fairtrade.

UK public support is also unprecedented, with more and more people buying into the Fairtrade market. In fact, according to the 2012/13 Fairtrade Annual Review, estimated retail sales value of Fairtrade products rose from £712, million in 2008 to £1.53 billion in 2012, which represented a 215 percent increase.

Has the movement helped local farmers?

Not so much, if you are to note down some of the shortcomings highlighted in a report commissioned by the UK government and produced by the School of Oriental and African Studies.

The Fairtrade, Employment and Poverty Reduction in Ethiopia and Uganda (FTEPR) project which lasted for four years set out to establish how global trade in agricultural commodities affects the lives of farmers and workers in rural Africa, especially through wage employment.

According to Professor Christopher Cramer, one of the report’s authors, the research team were not surprised to learn that people, who depend for their survival on access to manual agricultural wage employment, are much poorer than others in the same area.

Similarly, the report indicates that Fairtrade standards are far too concerned with the incomes of producers than they are with the wages of the workers themselves.

In essence, the report indicated that workers’ wages in Ethiopia and Uganda (two of the assessed countries) are typically lower and that in general terms, conditions for workers in Fairtrade organisations are worse compared to those in other organisations.

In terms of community projects supported by the Fairtrade premium, the report claims that in Uganda, for instance, a Fairtrade-supported school had turned away some poor children because they owed money in school fees.

Such findings defeat the sole purpose of what Fairtrade standards represent. In an ideal world, a Fairtrade-supported school should be able to support children from poor families so that they can have access to education much like children of farmers from organisations with no affiliation to Fairtrade.

On balance, the report proposes that for Fairtrade to truly serve its purpose, standards should focus more on whether average wage rates among such workers are at least as good as, if not higher than, those of very similar workers employed in other organisations.

In the same way, conditions of workers should be improved to reflect the premium paid by consumers who seek to ensure that every farmer who is part of the Fairtrade movement benefits from the increasing market share of Fairtrade products.

Otherwise, if standards do not improve, followed and monitored vigorously, the movement which has covered two decades will diminish into another band-aid type of movement.

Ambassador Yamina Karitanyi Presents Her Credentials to the President of Ireland

Her Excellency Ms. Yamina Karitanyi, Ambassador of the Republic of Rwanda to Ireland, presented her Letters of Credence to The President of Ireland, Michael Higgins, at a formal ceremony held at Áras an Uachtaráin.

The presentation marked the official assumption of duties as Non-Resident Ambassador of the Republic of Rwanda to Ireland. The Ambassador was received at Iveagh House in Dublin and escorted to Áras an Uachtaráin by an Escort of Honour consisting of a motorcycle detachment drawn from the 2nd Cavalry Squadron, Cathal Brugha Barracks, Dublin, under the command of Lieutenant Stephen Bunney.

A Guard of Honour was provided at Áras an Uachtaráin by the Naval Service, Haulbowline, Cork under the command of Sub-Lieutenant Eoin Mackey, and was welcomed warmly by The President of Ireland. During the ceremony, the Ambassador presented her Letters of Credence to The President, who then accredited her as the Ambassador of the Republic of Rwanda to Ireland.

The Ambassador thanked The President of Ireland for the audience and conveyed greetings and best wishes from H.E President Paul Kagame, expressing the desire to further strengthen a positive relationship and partnership between Rwanda and Ireland. The President, in turn, conveyed his best regards to H.E President Kagame and to the people of Rwanda.

The Ambassador was accompanied by Mr. Fidelis Mironko, First Counsellor, and other guests at the credentials ceremony included Ms. Marcella Corcoran-Kennedy T.D., Minister for Health Promotion, who represented the Government of Ireland at the Ceremony, Mr. Art O’Leary, Secretary-General to the President, Col. Michael Kiernan, Aide-de-Camp to the President, Mr. James Kingston, Assistant Secretary, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

H.E. Ms. Yamina Karitanyi later hosted a Vin d’Honneur at the O’Callaghan Mont Clare Hotel, Dublin, which was attended by several Ambassadors from friendly states, officials from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade of Ireland, members of the Civic Society, NGO’s, Friends of Rwanda and members of the Rwandese community in Ireland.

Speaking on behalf of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade of Ireland, Ms Paula Kenny, Desk Officer at the Development Cooperation Division, congratulated the Ambassador on her accreditation and, spoke positively of Rwanda’s transformation and continued progress, particularly praising Rwanda’s Economic development, its leadership in Women Empowerment and its peacekeeping initiatives.

Ms Kenny added that her department is proud to work with a stable, strategic and progressive partner, and that the strong bilateral relations between Ireland and Rwanda are based on shared values and priorities. She also assured the Ambassador that Ireland, through its Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, will offer its full support to Her Excellency throughout her tour of duty.

Addressing the guests, the Ambassador pledged to work tirelessly during her tour of duty to ensure that the solid collaboration between the two nations, which has had a positive impact on Rwanda over the years, continue to grow. Speaking on Rwanda’s transformation, Her Excellency reminded guests that many of the successes achieved thus far are thanks to home-grown solutions and good partnerships.

She said that the lessons from Rwanda’s heavy past “have given us [Rwandans] the resolve, tenacity and resilience that has brought the nation as far as it has come today”, and that with a clear vision of to make it a middle-income country by 2020; driven by a capable and responsive state, supported by a knowledge-based economy, the sky is the limit to how much Rwanda can achieve along with its partners.

The Ambassador noted that there is a growing engagement of Irish companies doing great work in Rwanda, such as Bewley’s Tea, the Healy Group, the International Computer Driving Licence, who’s African hub is based in Kigali, Traidlinks, adding that Rwanda expects the number of visitors and trade between the two countries to grow following the introduction of direct flights from Kigali to London Gatwick, with a short connection to Dublin, Ireland. The Ambassador invited tourists and investors to visit Rwanda, and take advantage of the eased access to the country.

The Ambassador closed by proposing a toast for the good health of The President of Ireland and for the continued strong bilateral relationship between Ireland and Rwanda.

Fufa Vote Regional Delegates in Polls

By Ismail Dhakaba Kigongo & Mudangha Kolyangha

Kampala — Today represents one of the most important steps of constituting the Fufa General Assembly that will turn vote the federation president in August.

Elections for regional representatives to Fufa’s most powerful organ for the eight regions are scheduled to take place. In all, there are 48 delegates from the regions.

This is the second phase of a process that started with voting district representatives last month.

While it’s a procession for some of the delegates as a significant number of whom have sailed through unopposed, close contests are expected in Kampala and Buganda regions.

Each of the eight regions, among which are Buganda, Kampala, West Nile, Eastern, North Eastern, Kitara, Western and Northen, will vote six delegates.

In one the four zones of Buganda, there are intriguing contest between former Fufa publicist Rogers Mulindwa and Sulait Makumbi.

Fufa executive committee member Sam Mpiima also faces Abdul Sekabira and Ismail Kalanda for one of the slots in elections to be held at Fufa House.

Joseph Mwanje went through unopposed for Buganda as did all six delegates from West Nile and North-Eastern.

That’s the same for Kampala representatives who include Fufa president Moses Magogo, Hamid Juma, Sande Moni Muyanja and Haruna Tamale who went through without any opposition.

There will an interesting contest between Makindye West MP Allan Ssewanyana and Fufa Excom member Darius Mogoye for the 24 Kampala region club votes.

In eastern region, Jamal Ngobi (Tororo), Sam Lwere (Budaka) and Latif Mafuko (Mbale) are unopposed.

There, Crispus Muwinda (Bugiri) is tussling out with Mr Jowali Kyeyago (Mayuge), Issa Magola (Iganga) is battling Richard Kimera (Jinja).

Kampala and Buganda vote today at Fufa House. Eastern region votes tomorrow. Western will decide on Saturday as well as Kitara and Northern.

Uganda

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Tanzania: CRDB Share Gains As Board Proposes Sh26bn Dividend

By Muyonga Jumanne

Dar es Salaam — Some 1,500 CRDB Bank shareholders will meet in Arusha at the weekend to endorse a Sh10 per share dividend proposed by the board.

The bank’s share gained by Sh5 at the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange (DSE) during the past two days to trade at Sh190.

The Sh10/share translates into a total dividend of Sh26 billion to be deducted from the bank’s last year net profit of Sh75 billion, managing director Charles Kimei said here yesterday.

He said the management and other banking minds would explain in detail, the challenges that banks faced in 2016 and the way forward.

“Stakeholders need to hear from people who are well versed in banking issues. During the AGM [annual general meeting], we will also discuss the banking sector as a whole and not just CRDB,” said Dr Kimei.

The AGM will be preceded by a seminar to equip shareholders with issues pertaining to ownership and stock market investment.

He said various topics would be presented at the seminar.

Forty-three per cent of CRDB’s shares are owned by thousands of investors who own less than one per cent each.

During the AGM, shareholders will also elect a new board member to replace former Prime Minister Frederick Sumaye who is retiring.

CRDB Bank Plc was incorporated in 1996 and was listed on DSE on June 17 2009. It has established two wholly owned subsidiaries in Tanzania in 2007 in Burundi in 2012.

Tanzania

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CRDB Share Gains As Board Proposes Sh26bn Dividend

By Muyonga Jumanne

Dar es Salaam — Some 1,500 CRDB Bank shareholders will meet in Arusha at the weekend to endorse a Sh10 per share dividend proposed by the board.

The bank’s share gained by Sh5 at the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange (DSE) during the past two days to trade at Sh190.

The Sh10/share translates into a total dividend of Sh26 billion to be deducted from the bank’s last year net profit of Sh75 billion, managing director Charles Kimei said here yesterday.

He said the management and other banking minds would explain in detail, the challenges that banks faced in 2016 and the way forward.

“Stakeholders need to hear from people who are well versed in banking issues. During the AGM [annual general meeting], we will also discuss the banking sector as a whole and not just CRDB,” said Dr Kimei.

The AGM will be preceded by a seminar to equip shareholders with issues pertaining to ownership and stock market investment.

He said various topics would be presented at the seminar.

Forty-three per cent of CRDB’s shares are owned by thousands of investors who own less than one per cent each.

During the AGM, shareholders will also elect a new board member to replace former Prime Minister Frederick Sumaye who is retiring.

CRDB Bank Plc was incorporated in 1996 and was listed on DSE on June 17 2009. It has established two wholly owned subsidiaries in Tanzania in 2007 in Burundi in 2012.

Tanzania

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Board Plans 60% Cotton Output Rise

Mwanza — The government wants to increase cotton production by about 60 per cent in the next three years as it seeks to bring the textile industry back to vibrancy, the Tanzania Cotton Board (TCB) said yesterday.

Director general Marco Mtunga told eight regional commissioners from the Western Cotton Growing Areas (WCGAs) during their visit to the Mwabusalu Seed Multiplication Station in Meatu District, Simiyu Region, yesterday that the goal would be achieved through adoption of best agricultural practices.

WCGAs encompass Simiyu, Shinyanga, Geita, Mwanza, Kagera, Kigoma, Singida and Tabora. “Adopting best agricultural practices including embracing contract farming, supported by adequate supply of quality inputs (seeds, insecticides, sprayers, fertilisers) will raise cotton output by over 60 per cent in the next three years,” Mr Mtunga said yesterday.

TCB is also banking on the adoption and multiplication of UKM08 — a newly certified cotton seed which is expected to improve the quality of cotton lint and yields.

He said the seed was developed through a project that was supported by the government and its development partners.

The two parties supported a research that was conducted at the Ukiriguru Agricultural Research Institute (Uari) to come up with the best seeds that could be used by cotton farmers.

“It has developed a number of new seed varieties and one of them is UKM08 which is currently being multiplied,” he said.

To ensure a sustainable revival process of quality cotton seed, the government has also created an enabling environment for the private sector to invest in seed multiplication, processing and marketing of cotton seed for planting to farmers.

The revival process will involve all stages of seed production from breeder seed, pre-basic seed, and basic seed to certified seed.

Uari will produce both breeder and pre-basic seeds at Ukiriguru and Nkanziga farm in Misungwi respectively then the private sector will collect the seeds for further multiplication at Mwabusalu in Meatu.

“The basic seeds produced in Meatu will be taken to Igunga district to be multiplied to get certified seed ready for distribution to farmers,” he explained.

Some of the advantages of the new seed, according to Mr Mtunga, include the fact that it tolerant to pests, diseases and drought.

Tanzania

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East African Community (EAC) partner states are divided on the proposed financing mechanisms to bail out the… Read more »

Nigeria: Fake Anti-Virus Raises Nigeria’s Volatility to Cyber-Attacks

By Adeyemi Adepetun, Femi Adekoya and Nkechi Onyedika-Ugoeze

Lagos and Abuja — Although the WannaCry ransomware that has been wreaking havoc has been stopped, there are indications that those who initiated the attack at the weekend could go on to alter the code and restart it all over again.

The list of African countries affected by the WannaCry ransomware includes, but is not limited to, South Africa, Angola, Mozambique, Tanzania, Nigeria and many more.

This poses a risk to Nigeria’s cyber space, which is predominantly characterised by a huge volume of fake, counterfeited and unlicensed software as well as illegal downloads.

Although the 2016 data of unlicensed software usage in Nigeria has not been released by the Business Software Alliance (BSA), however, it claimed that as at 2015, 80 per cent of software used in the country are unlicensed. It put the value at $232 million.

Besides, The Guardian learnt through industry sources that there has been a major increase of about 55 per cent sales and purchase of various inferior anti-virus software in the last six months in Nigeria.

In addition, the Nigeria Information Technology Development Agency (NITDA) has also alerted Nigerians to the attack, warning especially Ministries, Department and Agencies (MDAs) and other stakeholders to be wary.

NITDA’s Director-General, Dr. Isa Ali Pantanmi, in a statement explained that WannaCrypt spreads by itself between computers and does not require human interaction, stressing that it restricts access to the affected system as well as demanding for the payment of ransom.

The Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC) urged Nigerians to obtain software patch released by Microsoft in March 2017 to fix the Ransomware Virus; plan scheduled penetration tests on the networks and systems to ensure protection and availability at all times.

NCC urged subscribers who use their smartphones as substitutes to computers for Internet access to protect themselves and their devices by not opening e-mail attachments/links from unknown sources; not clicking pop-ups and applets on unknown websites and installing effective antivirus software for their mobile devices.

Meanwhile, the Minister of Communication Technology, Adebayo Shittu has stressed the need for the country to build a resilient cyber defence to check cyber crime.

Speaking at the cyber security summit organised by the Cyber Security Experts Association of Nigeria yesterday in Abuja, the minister noted that Nigeria loses over N127 billion to cyber crime, adding that the financial implication could be more as large number of incidents remain undetected or unreported.

He urged the participants to come up with strategies that will build better and safer cyber space for all.

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