Posts tagged as: flickr

South Africa:Robben Island Powered By Solar Mini-Grid

Photo: South African Tourism/Flickr

Aerial view of Robben Island.

Tourism Minister Tokozile Xasa says the launch of a R25 million solar-powered mini-grid plant at Robben Island is the first step in turning the world heritage site green.

The Minister unveiled the solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant on Thursday. The solar PV mini-grid has the capacity of generating 666.4 kilo Watt peak (kWp) of clean energy, reducing the island’s reliance on the existing diesel generating system.

The integrated system carries the entire daytime electricity load and prioritises solar PV energy generation, which is supported by an 828 kilo Watt hours (kWh) battery storage – enabling the use solar energy on cloudy days and at night.

“Today is the celebration of the exposition that reinforces a shared vision for the future of tourism.

“This project is the first step in a longer term initiative of greening the island and discussions are already underway with the management of Robben Island Museum on the implementation of a range of additional energy efficiency projects,” she said.

The Minister said the project now means that Robben Island – once a prison to the late former President and struggle icon Nelson Mandela, along with other Rivonia trialists and other political prisoners – practices sustainable tourism.

Robben Island was selected as one of the eight government-owned attractions in the pilot initiative to retrofit tourism facilities with solar photovoltaic (PV) energy generating systems.

The other seven sites include the Hantam, Karoo Desert, Free State National Botanical Gardens, the Skukuza and Lower Sabie rest camps as well as the Tshokwane and Nkuhlu picnic sites in Kruger National Park.

The launch of the solar mini-grid was a “first of its kind” on an island, said the Minister, adding that it would reduce the island’s carbon footprint by cutting the reliance on a diesel generating system.

The renewable energy system also means that the Robben Island Museum will not only become a more competitive and sustainable tourism attraction, but will also save a significant amount in operational costs.

“It is estimated that the system will reduce the use of diesel generators by almost 45 percent, which means that the annual diesel usage will drop from around 619 000 litres to 344 000 litres, saving the Island about 275 000 litres of diesel per annum.

“What we are therefore looking at is that this project will save the fiscal an estimated amount of almost R5 million per annum, which means that this project will pay itself within five years,” she said.

The Minister used the occasion to launch the opening of the first applications window for 2017 Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP).

The programme, which is run by the department, was developed in collaboration with the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) to drive the implementation of responsible tourism practices and also reduce the cost of doing business for small tourism enterprises.

“This sharp focus is but among some of the activities that truly showcase the government’s approach to the empowerment of women and young people. We therefore encourage women cooperatives, youth cooperatives and small enterprise firms to participate in the GTIP processes.”

Africa:Queer Women and Sexual Health – Are You Wrapped Up Sis?

Photo: Marcus Fridholm/Flickr

(File photo).

By Kylie Kiunguyu

The sexual health of queer women is difficult to discuss when there is such minimal information to share and even fewer protection options but the topic is even more important.

For the sexually active heterosexual woman the standard has been set: when in doubt carry your own. Protection that is, we are talking about protection. Every teenager receives some form of sexual education in school but because of reasons to do with stigma, legislation, tradition and culture sex education does not cover queer sex. For gay men this doesn’t really present an issue because lucky for them male privilege dictates that sexual education even in limited forms extensively covers the male anatomy. Meaning, we all learn how to put a condom on a banana but we don’t even know that dental dams exist.

The mainstreaming of sexual health for heterosexuals makes it difficult to discuss queer women’s health issues because there hasn’t been enough research done on the rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV in queer women.

Even more telling is casual conversations and interviews, which show that most queer women are not having safe sex due to the fact that they don’t have to worry about unplanned pregnancy. There’s also the assumption that the risk of contracting STIs from partners is fairly low, which deems protection “superfluous”. Both these reasons lead to the general perception that once off encounters do not warrant the uncomfortable protection conversations that prelude sex. Apparently, no one is really thinking about protection in the heat of the moment when you “know” queer sex means you’re “in the clear”.

So allow me to dispel these misconceptions for the queer folk with a list of STIs that you can in fact contract:

HPV Human Papilloma: The virus is probably the most common STI as its transmitted by skin-to-skin contact. This means that even if you only have sex with women, you’re still at risk for infection. The virus is sneaky too, because it can lay latent in your body, so without being tested, you may never know you have it. A history of HPV infection is the single most significant risk factor for developing cervical cancer two strains in particular have been identified to cause over 75% of cervical cancer while some strains cause genital warts.

Medical Fix: Get a pap smear. Cervical cancer takes years to develop, so going to the gynecologist gives you a good chance of never having the disease progress any further

Gonorrhea & Chlamydia: Gonorrhea and chlamydia can be transmitted through sharing toys, bodily fluids, and genital contact. These infections can be silent, or can present with symptoms like burning when you pee, discharge and stomach pain.

Medical Fix: Luckily, both are easily treated with a quick dose of antibiotics. Without treatment, however, gonorrhea and chlamydia can progress to pelvic inflammatory disease, which can cause infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and serious infections, among other things

Bacterial vaginosis: queer women seem to be at increased risk for transmitting and acquiring the infection. It can be silent, or announce itself with white-ish discharge and a fishy smell, but is usually not itchy or painful like a yeast infection. We’re not exactly sure how it’s transmitted, but the likely routes are through sex toys, oral and oral-anal sex. Ultimately women who engage in vulva to vulva sex are at a higher risk of transmitting bacterial vaginosis (BV)

Medical Fix: when one partner has it, the other partner is often infected too. If you happen to find yourself with this infection, bring your partner with you to the doctor, and have her get tested as well

Yeast Infections/Candidiasis: vaginal thrush (or yeast infections) is remarkably common: almost three-quarters of women will get a yeast infection at least once in their lifetime, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The cardinal symptom of yeast infection is itching accompanied by a thick white discharge from the vagina. Queer women give each other Yeast Infections all the of the time.

Medical Fix: In uncomplicated yeast infections, over-the-counter treatments can be quite effective but if symptoms persist, a visit to your family doctor or gynecologist is a must. Remember BV can present as a yeast infection so do not self-medicate for a yeast infection when you are sexually active with over the counter products as that can actually make BV much worse.

Herpes: It can be transmitted through oral or genital sex. There is treatment for herpes, which will cause you to have fewer outbreaks, but won’t cure you. The tricky thing about herpes is, even if you do not have an active sore, you can still transmit the infection to your partner.

Medical Fix: There are ways to predict when you are infectious, so talk to your doctor and get regular checks

HIV: The virus can be transmitted through blood, genital secretions and breast milk, but not saliva. There aren’t a lot of statistics out there on risks of HIV transmission in queer women

Medical Fix: Knowing your status gives you access to informed options that can protect both you and your partner

So now that we’ve outlined what you can contract as a sexually active queer woman shall we talk sex fixes and protection? There are plenty of things that you can do to insure a safe and sexy time is had by all.

1. Wash your hands before getting down and dirty. It may sound basic but it staves away infections.

2. Dental dams are probably the most unsexy thing on the planet but they’re super easy to use and effective. You just put down the rubber barrier on your partner’s vulva and go to town.

3. Get yourself a sexy box of gloves to keep on hand or in your night side table. Gloves are multi-purpose and pretty self-explanatory.

4. Don’t share sex toys and if you do, use a condom, or properly clean them with soap and water before switching to a new user.

5. Keep condoms around as well. Why? a. You should use them if you’re sharing sex toys with different partners (even if you clean your toys, as you should). b. You can cut a condom down the middle to create a makeshift dental dam. It’s important to note that this is not ideal, but good to have as a backup.

6. Share sexual History one of the best things that you and your partner can do to protect yourselves and one another, is to communicate! Talk about whether you’ve had sex with men in the past, if you’ve been tested before and if you haven’t been tested, (and I hope we’ve covered this) get tested.

It’s unfortunate that all things sex are targeted at male pleasure and you can easily find condoms in all shapes, flavours and textures for men. However, protection that is targeted at the other half of the population is often cumbersome and impractical. But this article isn’t about practicality, it’s about education and options so do yourself a favour sis and delve deeper into what works best for you and keeps your sexual health intact.

Africa: Queer Women and Sexual Health – Are You Wrapped Up Sis?

Photo: Marcus Fridholm/Flickr

(File photo).

By Kylie Kiunguyu

The sexual health of queer women is difficult to discuss when there is such minimal information to share and even fewer protection options but the topic is even more important.

For the sexually active heterosexual woman the standard has been set: when in doubt carry your own. Protection that is, we are talking about protection. Every teenager receives some form of sexual education in school but because of reasons to do with stigma, legislation, tradition and culture sex education does not cover queer sex. For gay men this doesn’t really present an issue because lucky for them male privilege dictates that sexual education even in limited forms extensively covers the male anatomy. Meaning, we all learn how to put a condom on a banana but we don’t even know that dental dams exist.

The mainstreaming of sexual health for heterosexuals makes it difficult to discuss queer women’s health issues because there hasn’t been enough research done on the rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV in queer women.

Even more telling is casual conversations and interviews, which show that most queer women are not having safe sex due to the fact that they don’t have to worry about unplanned pregnancy. There’s also the assumption that the risk of contracting STIs from partners is fairly low, which deems protection “superfluous”. Both these reasons lead to the general perception that once off encounters do not warrant the uncomfortable protection conversations that prelude sex. Apparently, no one is really thinking about protection in the heat of the moment when you “know” queer sex means you’re “in the clear”.

So allow me to dispel these misconceptions for the queer folk with a list of STIs that you can in fact contract:

HPV Human Papilloma: The virus is probably the most common STI as its transmitted by skin-to-skin contact. This means that even if you only have sex with women, you’re still at risk for infection. The virus is sneaky too, because it can lay latent in your body, so without being tested, you may never know you have it. A history of HPV infection is the single most significant risk factor for developing cervical cancer two strains in particular have been identified to cause over 75% of cervical cancer while some strains cause genital warts.

Medical Fix: Get a pap smear. Cervical cancer takes years to develop, so going to the gynecologist gives you a good chance of never having the disease progress any further

Gonorrhea & Chlamydia: Gonorrhea and chlamydia can be transmitted through sharing toys, bodily fluids, and genital contact. These infections can be silent, or can present with symptoms like burning when you pee, discharge and stomach pain.

Medical Fix: Luckily, both are easily treated with a quick dose of antibiotics. Without treatment, however, gonorrhea and chlamydia can progress to pelvic inflammatory disease, which can cause infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and serious infections, among other things

Bacterial vaginosis: queer women seem to be at increased risk for transmitting and acquiring the infection. It can be silent, or announce itself with white-ish discharge and a fishy smell, but is usually not itchy or painful like a yeast infection. We’re not exactly sure how it’s transmitted, but the likely routes are through sex toys, oral and oral-anal sex. Ultimately women who engage in vulva to vulva sex are at a higher risk of transmitting bacterial vaginosis (BV)

Medical Fix: when one partner has it, the other partner is often infected too. If you happen to find yourself with this infection, bring your partner with you to the doctor, and have her get tested as well

Yeast Infections/Candidiasis: vaginal thrush (or yeast infections) is remarkably common: almost three-quarters of women will get a yeast infection at least once in their lifetime, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The cardinal symptom of yeast infection is itching accompanied by a thick white discharge from the vagina. Queer women give each other Yeast Infections all the of the time.

Medical Fix: In uncomplicated yeast infections, over-the-counter treatments can be quite effective but if symptoms persist, a visit to your family doctor or gynecologist is a must. Remember BV can present as a yeast infection so do not self-medicate for a yeast infection when you are sexually active with over the counter products as that can actually make BV much worse.

Herpes: It can be transmitted through oral or genital sex. There is treatment for herpes, which will cause you to have fewer outbreaks, but won’t cure you. The tricky thing about herpes is, even if you do not have an active sore, you can still transmit the infection to your partner.

Medical Fix: There are ways to predict when you are infectious, so talk to your doctor and get regular checks

HIV: The virus can be transmitted through blood, genital secretions and breast milk, but not saliva. There aren’t a lot of statistics out there on risks of HIV transmission in queer women

Medical Fix: Knowing your status gives you access to informed options that can protect both you and your partner

So now that we’ve outlined what you can contract as a sexually active queer woman shall we talk sex fixes and protection? There are plenty of things that you can do to insure a safe and sexy time is had by all.

1. Wash your hands before getting down and dirty. It may sound basic but it staves away infections.

2. Dental dams are probably the most unsexy thing on the planet but they’re super easy to use and effective. You just put down the rubber barrier on your partner’s vulva and go to town.

3. Get yourself a sexy box of gloves to keep on hand or in your night side table. Gloves are multi-purpose and pretty self-explanatory.

4. Don’t share sex toys and if you do, use a condom, or properly clean them with soap and water before switching to a new user.

5. Keep condoms around as well. Why? a. You should use them if you’re sharing sex toys with different partners (even if you clean your toys, as you should). b. You can cut a condom down the middle to create a makeshift dental dam. It’s important to note that this is not ideal, but good to have as a backup.

6. Share sexual History one of the best things that you and your partner can do to protect yourselves and one another, is to communicate! Talk about whether you’ve had sex with men in the past, if you’ve been tested before and if you haven’t been tested, (and I hope we’ve covered this) get tested.

It’s unfortunate that all things sex are targeted at male pleasure and you can easily find condoms in all shapes, flavours and textures for men. However, protection that is targeted at the other half of the population is often cumbersome and impractical. But this article isn’t about practicality, it’s about education and options so do yourself a favour sis and delve deeper into what works best for you and keeps your sexual health intact.

18th Woman Killed in Wakiso

Photo: Tony Webster/Flickr

(file photo)

By Joseph Kato

Kampala — Another body of unidentified woman has been picked by police in Kitala, Katabi town council, Entebbe, in Wakiso District.

Kampala Metropolitan Police Spokesperson, Mr Emilian Kayima, said the decomposing body of a lady in her 30s was found dumped by the roadside in the wee hours of Sunday.

“This morning we got information of yet another body in Kitala Entebbe of yet to be identified person, a lady possibly in her 30s whose body was dumped by the roadside and it was in a decomposing state,” Mr Kayima said.

Mr Kayima said the body was picked by police and taken to hospital for post-mortem. He said police was combing the area to see if there are possible leads to have the accomplices arrested.

She becomes the 18th woman to be killed in Wakiso District especially in Katabi town council, in Entebbe and Nansana Municipality. At least 11 women have been killed in Entebbe and eight in Nansana between May and August.

The Inspector General of Police, Gen Kale Kayihura, on Monday attributed the women murders to ritual sacrifices. He said a suspect connected to the murders confessed to have killed at least eight women on orders of a business tycoon in Nansana for his ritual satisfaction to get more wealth.

Uganda

President Museveni, Singer Bobi Wine Square Off in By-Election

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Man Arrested Over Killing of Swiss Nationals in Mombasa

Photo: [paumelia]/Flickr

Police line. Crime scene tape.

By Correspondent

Mombasa — Police have arrested one suspect behind the murder of two Swiss nationals – Werner Borner Paul and Marrianne Borner – in Mombasa.

Kisauni police boss Christopher Rotich says two other suspects, a caretaker and night guard, are on the run.

Rotich says the elderly couple was murdered in their home in Nyali estate where they had lived for more than 20 years.

“They are retirees who had built their home within Links Road in Nyali where they were attacked and murdered on Saturday night.” said Rotich.

He says they two landed at the Moi international airport on Saturday night and were accosted as they entered their compound by people suspected to be workers and a hired hit squad.

Their bodies were dumped by the roadside within Kiembeni area using their own car.

A team of forensic detectives visited the home and dusted the vehicle that had blood stains.

It’s believed the two had cash on their return from Switzerland.

Police say it was an inside job planned and executed by workers and hired goons.

Kenya

Opposition’s Election Case Lodged with Court

Lawyers for opposition leader Raila Odinga have served their 25,000-page presidential election petition papers on… Read more »

Zimbabwe: Media Emotionally Razed Me, Says HIV Activist Westerhof

Photo: Jon S/Flickr

(File photo).

Fashion model turned fashion model Tendayi Westerhof-Kateketa said 16 years ago she lost everything after she came out publicly about her HIV status with the media ganging up against her.

Tendayi was married to former Warriors coach Clemence Westerhof and divorced in 2002-the same year she disclosed that she was HIV positive blaming it on the husband, allegations he denied.

She was to later form the Public Personalities against Aids Trust (PPAAT). This, according to her, was meant to encourage other public figures to come out in the open about their HIV status.

In an interview, the vocal Aids activist said she still believes that some journalists were paid to write negative things about her because she had touched a high profile man (Clemence Westerhof).

“And we know there is what is called pocket journalism, which happens and we have seen it on TV and even journalists talking about that,” said Tendayi.

“Sometimes journalists were paid to write and damage me.”

She added, “Because I had touched where it hurts most, disclosing my status and it was very direct, and how I thought I contracted HIV, and the whole picture of it I had put it in the public arena.”

Tendayi said the same journalists who had called her a “gold digger” when she married the National Soccer Team coach were to again attack her for coming out in open about her HIV status.

“Had it been him (Clemence) coming out in the open about his status the media was still going to blame it on me,” she said.

“And this was like a fight between men and women as I was now speaking on behalf of other women.”

She added, “I was the voice in the wilderness and this had touched on a lot of people, not just my marriage or me Tendayi the person, but whoever was involved.”

Tendayi’s husband once coached Sporting Lions FC; he was also a technical director at the Harare-based Agatha Sheneti Youth Academy, Harare United FC and a technical director at the country’s biggest and oldest club Dynamos FC.

She has now published books to tell her real life story, the first one titled ‘Unlucky in Love’.

“I have four children with 3 different men and no one ever bothered to ask me why, but all I can say is the story is in my first book,” she said.

“Unlucky in Love has a story of my living testimony, and talks about my love life, HIV disclosure and what I went through.”

She added, “The book talks about how I lived a double life, how I suffered emotionally and mentally as I thought this was the end of the world for me.”

On her second book ‘Dear Cousin’, Tendayi said, “This book is full of advice to anyone who is HIV positive or negative, as HIV knows no boundary.”

“Anyone rich or poor can be infected or affected.”

Tendayi said she was the country’s coordinator for the Pan-African Positive Woman’s Coalition and this has given her a chance to travel around the country and the world to summits and workshops to deliver her testimonies.

She is currently writing her 3rd book to be published “soon”.

Egypt: Egypt Train Crews Held Following Fatal Crash

Photo: Tony Webster/Flickr

At least 41 people were killed and more than 130 injured when two trains collided in the Egyptian city of Alexandria on Friday. Footage of the crash site showed medics working to rescue the injured from the wreckage.

The prosecutor has ordered the detention of two train drivers and their assistants involved in Friday’s fatal accident, according to the state news agency MENA.

The engineers are to be held for 15 days while the investigation continues. Blood and urine samples were taken from one driver to test for drug use.

Transport Minister Hesham Arafat told President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi that the accident was the result of human error, though he did not elaborate.

Egyptians have long complained that successive governments have failed to maintain basic safeguards on the railway lines, and Friday’s accident was just the latest in a series of crashes that have heightened public anger.

The Egyptian Railways Authority said that a train traveling from Cairo hit a train waiting Friday at a small station in the district of Khorshid, at about 2:15 p.m. local time. The idle train had recently arrived from the Mediterranean city of Port Said.

It did not say what caused the accident, but said that experts would investigate. Transport ministry officials separately told state television that the crash could have been caused by a malfunction in one of the trains that caused it to stop on the tracks.

A local resident only identified as Hoda told the Reuters news agency that she was standing on her rooftop when she saw the trains plough into each other.

“They rose in the air forming a pyramid when they collided,” she said. “I started to scream from the rooftops for people to grab some sheets and run.”

Images of the crash site broadcast on state television showed that several carriages had derailed as a result of the collision and that one train had partly keeled over. The footage also showed bodies covered with bed sheets lying near the tracks while medics worked to move the dead and injured to ambulances. Locals also rushed to the tracks to help the crash victims.

Passenger Moumen Youssef said: “The train I was riding was going very quickly. I found myself on the floor. When we came out, we found four train cars crushed and a lot of people on the ground.”

The Health Ministry released a statement saying 42 people were killed and 133 were injured.

President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi and the country’s chief prosecutor, Nabil Sadeq, both ordered an inquiry into the crash.

Deadliest crash since 2013

Friday’s crash was the deadliest train accident in the North African country since a November 2013 crash between a bus and a train that killed 27 people south of Cairo.

Egypt’s worst rail disaster took place in 2002 when a train traveling to southern Egypt caught fire, killing over 360 people.

The country’s railway system has a poor safety recordthat has been blamed on poor management and badly maintained equipment.

Egypt

Fatal Passenger Train Collision in Egypt

Two trains have collided in the Egyptian city of Alexandria, killing at least 36 people and injuring over 100. Footage… Read more »

Homosexual Defilement and Rape Should Be Dealt With Too

Photo: Joe Gratz/Flickr

Judge’s gavel (file photo).

opinionBy Cato N. Lund

I was taken back to Saturday August 2, 2008 by the editorial in Daily Monitor of May 9. The main front page banner of Saturday Vision that day was a figure in large and bold print: “40 000, the number of primary school girls defiled by their teachers in one year”. It referred to a recent survey but unfortunately, I don’t remember who had performed it.

Some years later another survey, by the World Health Organisation (WHO), brought out other figures on annual occurrences in Uganda: 700, 000 unwanted pregnancies, 300,000 abortions, and 68,000 women dying from complications caused by illegal and unsafe abortions, 700,000 unwanted pregnancies take-away 300,000 abortions makes 400,000 unwanted children. That is a substantial number denied the first and basic right of any child: to be welcome.

Then 12,077 defilement cases were reported and investigated in 2014 according to Uganda Bureau of Statistics (Ubos).

The above figures indicate that this is just the tip of an iceberg. The actual size of the iceberg is difficult to assess, many cases go unreported because they are “settled out of court” by the perpetrator paying a sum of money to the parents or giving some other compensation.

Alternatively, he uses his position to intimidate the victim and her parents to keep silent and drop the case completely.

Together with common lack of confidence in the police, assuming nothing will be done unless reporting of the case comes together with some “facilitation”, this results in skewed statistics.

Defilement is ultimately punishable by death under the Ugandan law; if anything demonstrates the futility of capital punishment as a deterrent, this must be one of the most glaring examples.

To the number of primary school girls defiled by their teachers, add those suffering the same fate in secondary schools, in their families and the villages, and we will arrive at a staggering figure, say 60,000 as a conservative estimate. That means seven girls are defiled per hour, 24/7.

UBOS’ 2014 crime table also records 1,099 cases of reported rape. Again I am quite sure we only see the tip of a huge iceberg.

Victims fail to report because of unwarranted shame, fear of bigotry, stigma and blame, difficulty of bringing material evidence to support her narrative, and numerous other reasons.

It may be a very conservative supposition, having the number of unwanted pregnancies in mind, to assume four unreported cases for each that is reported, so the actual number comes to five times the one given in the table, or 5,495, more than 15 per day through the year.

Much energy, indignation and effort has been invested in protecting our children from bad influence.

It is certainly good to shield them from sexual predators, but consider this, the number of homosexuals in any human population is deemed to be between two and 10 per cent, if we go for the lower estimate in Uganda, we remain with 98 per cent heterosexuals. Nothing indicates that the rate of sexual predation is different in these groups, so the risk that such a predator is heterosexual is 49 times bigger than him being homosexual. As for the cases of rape, there is not much doubt regarding the sexual orientation of the perpetrator.

Comparing the expressions of moral ire, religious and legal zeal to deal with homosexuality with the reactions to heterosexual defilement and rape, shows an incredible level of hypocrisy. It is like the reasoning is: “I’m not homosexual but the rapist could have been me, so let us downplay the latter and raise commotion over the first”. In a patriarchal society women are submissive so they keep silent and ask their own husbands at home.

European Union to Increase Investments in the Continent

Photo: Bobby Hiddy/Flickr

European Union (file photo).

By Sadab Kitatta Kaaya

At celebrations to mark the 60th European Union (EU) day, the head of the EU delegation in Uganda, Kristian Schmidt, announced that the economic bloc’s investments in Africa will increase to over €44 billion by 2020.

In a speech at a cocktail to mark the day at his residence at Kampala’s upscale neighbourhood of Kololo, Schmidt said the EU will seek to boost responsible and sustainable investments in Africa during the Africa-Europe summit in November this year, as a part of its external investment plan.

This is one of the interventions that the EU is focussing on in its bid to deal with the refugee crisis in Europe and in its African partners such as Uganda, which is home to more than 1.2 million refugees.

“It is a fair question. How will the world help Uganda face this challenge? The answer is in the external investment plan. We expect to leverage €44bn Euros of Europe’s investments in Africa as of 2020,” Schmidt said.

The trade value between Europe and Uganda stood at €985m by the end of last year which represents a 60 per cent increase over the past 10 years.

AGE-LIMIT

Making reference to Monday’s election of Emmanuel Macron as the new French president, Schmidt told Museveni, who was chief guest at the cocktail, not to kill the debate for change of leadership.

“Change is necessary for Uganda but that change, what it will be, will be Uganda’s decision,” Schmidt said.

“I hope you will allow me to make three wishes for Uganda. The first wish is that you don’t let your democratic process stall or regress, and those in power do not close their minds to minority views; even when those, out of maginalization and despair, lead them to express their disagreement, both in frustration and anger, we pray you keep the political space open,” Schmidt further told Museveni.

He went on to speak against violation of people’s rights by the security forces, whom he said should increasingly become accountable to the people they serve.

In his speech, Museveni steered clear of Schmidt’s political remarks, choosing to concentrate on the priorities to which the EU channels its aid.

“I appreciate your aid to Uganda; however, I would like this aid to be more focussed” Museveni said.

Museveni seemed uncomfortable with EU’s funding to advocacy groups, which he said are unsustainable.

“If you say we are supporting children’s rights, do you have the money to support it sustainably? Or are you going to support them with endless donations? If somebody is depending on donations, we call that economic leukaemia. I don’t want a situation of economic leukaemia,” Museveni said.

Africa

Finalists for Miss Geek Africa 2017 Competition Unveiled

Five girls with innovative ideas have been selected as the finalists for the first ever Miss Geek Africa, a competition… Read more »

STL’s ‘Big Girl’ Chosen as Sound Track for Hollywood Movie

Photo: Ernst Vikne/Flickr

Kenyan rapper Stella Mwangi

By Naira Habib

Singer Stella Mwangi also known as STL, music career seems to be flying high as her song titled Big Girl has chosen as the sound track to Hollywood movie, Rough Night set to be released in June 2017.

The song is off her latest Hollywood EP album called Stella Mwangi. The movie will star award winning actress, Scarlet Johanson, Kate McKinnon, Zoe Kravitz, Jillian Bell and Ilaa Glazer.

This will be STL ‘ s third project from her EP to be featured on a Hollywood Project.

SOUNDTRACK

STL’s single Set it off > from EP (Extended-Play) Big Girl featured as a soundtrack on the third episode of BET Africa’s show, Being Mary Jane Season 4.

One of her other songs was also clinched by Fox Networks of the single Get Up & Go off the EP (Extended-Play) Big Girl to feature as a soundtrack on the second season of Rosewood .

The song appeared on Episode 15 titled Clavicle Trauma and Closure aired on February 10, 2017.

STL’s EP is a fusion of songs with high energy where she continues to create a diverse sound, fusing Swahili and English while remaining authentic to her African origin and style.

Kenya

Drought Lifts Power Exports to Kenya By 300%

Uganda’s electricity exports to Kenya grew 300 per cent in the four months to April as drought cut the neighbouring… Read more »

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