Posts tagged as: council

Capital Development Authority ‘Outlived Its Purpose’

Photo: Daily News

Capital Development Authority building.

By Alvar Mwakyusa

Former Speaker of the National Assembly, Pius Msekwa has joined an array of patrons supporting dissolution of the Capital Development Authority (CDA), stressing that the purpose for its establishment in 1973 had long gone.

“CDA was formed to serve its purpose at that time. Things have changed and we need to move with time. Its dissolution is a significant step towards development,” the senior citizen remarked in response to an inquiry by ‘Daily News’ on the disbandment.

Mr Msekwa hailed President John Magufuli for the bold move to disband the authority, remarking further that; “every generation must write its own book.”

In a previous interview with this paper last year, the former Speaker revealed how he and other leaders at that time played an instrumental role in establishing CDA, to foster the transfer of the capital city from Dar es Salaam to Dodoma.

“I remember attending a meeting chaired by the then President, Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, which agreed on forming an entity that would spearhead the transfer and it came out to be CDA,” he said then, during the interview at his home.

And, in another interview towards the end of last year, former Prime Minister Cleopa Msuya recalled how the government was determined to shift its seat to the central region.

“The late George Kahama was the first Director General of CDA and he is the one who developed the master plan for Dodoma,” the former PM explained.

In a related development, the chair of a taskforce formed by Dodoma Regional Commissioner, Jordan Rugimbana to work on grievances of residents against the now defunct CDA, Mr Aron Kinunda, echoed the views by Mr Msekwa, noting that the objectives for its formation had been met.

“The dissolution of CDA, by President Magufuli, is a good step for the development of Dodoma; it is now apparent that land conflicts arising from differing legislations covering CDA on one hand and Dodoma Municipal Council on the other, will be no more,” he explained.

According to Mr Kinunda, residents in the designated capital received the news with a sigh of relief, since the authority had turned out to be “a menace to the society.”

Tanzania

Increased Budget Allocation to Push Govt Industrial Drive

The Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment has doubled development budget in the 2017/18 financial year, pushing the… Read more »

IMF Leader Touts for More Stable Tax Regime

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) Deputy Managing Director, Tao Zhang has hailed Tanzania for managing to boost tax collection to finance infrastructure development but cautioned the country needs a more stable tax regime to remain an attractive investment destination.

The visiting IMF leader said it was vital to mobilise more private and public resources by strengthening tax collection but unpredictability of tax regime remained a challenge as the country strive to develop an industrial economy as envisaged in the second Five-Year Development Plan.

“So it is crucial to mobilise more private and public resources within Tanzania, especially by strengthening tax collection under a fair and predictable tax regime. This is an area where Tanzania has fallen behind its neighbours,” he said at a public lecture he gave in Dar es Salaam yesterday.

He described Tanzania as a strong performer in terms of economic growth and macroeconomic stability but argued the country needed to strengthen the role of private sector to sustain its impressive growth which has remained strong for over two decades.

He said the second Five-Year Development Plan would succeed if Tanzania would make optimal use of its comparative advantages, particularly the potential from agricultural and mining and possibilities of becoming a trading and logistic hub for East Africa.

Tanzania should also strengthen the business climate for local and foreign firms to attract investments, he said. The business community have been complaining of an unpredictable and complex taxation system which make doing business in Tanzania much harder and as a result discourage investment.

The government has restated its commitment to work on complaints from investors and business people of nuisance taxes ensure the country’s tax system does not stifle the private sector.

Touring industrial exhibitions at Dar es Salaam International Trade Fair (DITF) grounds in December last year, the Minister for Finance and Planning, Dr Phillip Mpango had urged investors and the business community to forward to his ministry their tax recommendations so that they can be evaluated and incorporated into next year’s financial budget plans.

And speaking at a meeting with members of the private sector under the Tanzania National Business Council (TNBC) at State House in Dar es Salaam early this month, President John Magufuli said his government was ready to work with the private sector which he described as the engine of the economy.

The meeting washeld in the wake of reports of weakening investor confidence due to concerns about the economy, policy unpredictability and tax crackdown targeting big companies.

Magufuli dispelled sentiments that his government was “anti-business,” saying he was pro-business, but his administration would not tolerate tax dodging, which was rampant in Tanzania in previous years.

Tanzania

Capital Development Authority ‘Outlived Its Purpose’

Former Speaker of the National Assembly, Pius Msekwa has joined an array of patrons supporting dissolution of the… Read more »

323 Million/ – Given to Rombo Expected to Accelerate Economic Development

By Queen Isack

Rombo — Rombo District Council has been given some 323m/- for development projects in the 2016/17 financial year, so as to speed up development, it has been revealed here.

Rombo District Executive Director (DED), Ms Agnes John, said the money would be spent on important public projects like water provision, health centres, and ward offices. Speaking to villagers and council officials, Ms John stressed that village and ward officials should manage the projects effectively, a critical aspect being judicious expenditure of funds.

The official emphasized that the people, as the targeted beneficiaries, should keep close track of the projects, by, among other measures, regularly demanding income-andexpenditure records. She furthermore stressed that those who would not comply with government directives would be duly sanctioned.

The DED said the government had allocated 1bn/- for a water project in Ngareni village and 927m/- for construction of roads in Leto village.

The Rombo District Commissioner (DC), Ms Agnes Hokororo, said officials and the people should forge a close alliance in order to facilitate smooth execution of projects and other purposes for which public funds were allocated.

She stressed that the government was determined to elevate transparency and accountability to the peak, since it was only thus that poverty could at best be eradicated, and at worst, reduced.

The Ngoyoni Ward Executive Officer, Mr Isaya Tarimo, said the biggest challenge he faced was little awareness among the people on their importance to contribute willingly and seriously to development projects.

Tanzania

Capital Development Authority ‘Outlived Its Purpose’

Former Speaker of the National Assembly, Pius Msekwa has joined an array of patrons supporting dissolution of the… Read more »

Rwanda: New Deal Seeks to Encourage Investments in Youth Agribusiness

By Elias Hakizimana

Rwanda Youth in Agribusiness Forum (RYAF) has signed a five-year partnership with Ghanaian African Agribusiness Incubation Network (AAIN) to support youth in agribusiness.

The partnership is hinged on encouraging the youth to change their attitude and invest some money before seeking support from other partners as well as mobilising funding for youth agribusinesses.

Alex Ariho, the chief executive of AAIN, said the first capital is information and positive attitude.

“It is important that African youth and, particularly youth in Rwanda, acknowledge that they have got the first capital; the first capital in business is attitude you have toward what you intend to do, the second capital is information,” Ariho said.

“I am happy to hear that the youth here are very active in terms of using ICT. If you are able to use social media, to use journalism to create a positive attitude to investors about investing, the third capital will come when you already have the two fundamental elements of investments: information and positive attitude.”

He identified capital in different forms, including human capital, infrastructure, technology, seed investment and policy framework.

“For the youth to propose or to start businesses and create jobs, they need the four elements. We are committed to that partnership and will achieve it because youth have the four forms of capital,” Ariho said.

He added that their priority in terms of investing in the youth will be to pick the four elements and package them into collaborative framework, between the African Agribusiness Incubator Network and the Government of Rwanda.

Ariho said they will also build youth capacity to learn successful businesses using incubation models particularly mentoring.

“Of course, we also target direct investment in youth trade and investments where we make sure that there is output and input market infrastructure development for the products that are produced by African youth, by the Rwandan youth and consumed there. We will ensure that in the next five to 10 years, we have created a number of jobs and increased income in households, among smallholder farmers, in SMEs and created new businesses,” Ariho noted.

Speaking to the media, Jean Baptiste Hategekimana, the chairperson of RYAF, said the initiative will benefit more than 1,400 youths from the five clusters of the forum by equipping them with skills and other resources.

He said they expected fruitful impact from the agreement with AAIN because the signing comes after they have already begun working together.

“We do believe that with this partnership, we will be able to learn from other youth in Africa and learn through the ways they have passed and succeeded,” Hategekimana said.

“As we are only a year into the forum, these people are experts on the continent and if we can plan a project together to train 200 youth or equip them with other support as well as bringing investors, it will be easy for us to understand the philosophy of success as we will be working with professionals in certain programmes,” Hategekimana said.

Donat Nishyirembere, the in-charge of youth entrepreneurship at the National Youth Council, said the youth can gain from the incubation network to shape their ideas.

“The National Youth Council commits to support this initiative as we believe it will ensure access to the global markets and increase capacity for youth; and they will be able to take their businesses to another level,” said Nishyirembere.

Pacifique Uwineza, the chairperson of chamber for youth entrepreneurs at the Private Sector Federation, said through networking, the youth will learn from each other in terms of job creation.

New Deal Seeks to Encourage Investments in Youth Agribusiness

By Elias Hakizimana

Rwanda Youth in Agribusiness Forum (RYAF) has signed a five-year partnership with Ghanaian African Agribusiness Incubation Network (AAIN) to support youth in agribusiness.

The partnership is hinged on encouraging the youth to change their attitude and invest some money before seeking support from other partners as well as mobilising funding for youth agribusinesses.

Alex Ariho, the chief executive of AAIN, said the first capital is information and positive attitude.

“It is important that African youth and, particularly youth in Rwanda, acknowledge that they have got the first capital; the first capital in business is attitude you have toward what you intend to do, the second capital is information,” Ariho said.

“I am happy to hear that the youth here are very active in terms of using ICT. If you are able to use social media, to use journalism to create a positive attitude to investors about investing, the third capital will come when you already have the two fundamental elements of investments: information and positive attitude.”

He identified capital in different forms, including human capital, infrastructure, technology, seed investment and policy framework.

“For the youth to propose or to start businesses and create jobs, they need the four elements. We are committed to that partnership and will achieve it because youth have the four forms of capital,” Ariho said.

He added that their priority in terms of investing in the youth will be to pick the four elements and package them into collaborative framework, between the African Agribusiness Incubator Network and the Government of Rwanda.

Ariho said they will also build youth capacity to learn successful businesses using incubation models particularly mentoring.

“Of course, we also target direct investment in youth trade and investments where we make sure that there is output and input market infrastructure development for the products that are produced by African youth, by the Rwandan youth and consumed there. We will ensure that in the next five to 10 years, we have created a number of jobs and increased income in households, among smallholder farmers, in SMEs and created new businesses,” Ariho noted.

Speaking to the media, Jean Baptiste Hategekimana, the chairperson of RYAF, said the initiative will benefit more than 1,400 youths from the five clusters of the forum by equipping them with skills and other resources.

He said they expected fruitful impact from the agreement with AAIN because the signing comes after they have already begun working together.

“We do believe that with this partnership, we will be able to learn from other youth in Africa and learn through the ways they have passed and succeeded,” Hategekimana said.

“As we are only a year into the forum, these people are experts on the continent and if we can plan a project together to train 200 youth or equip them with other support as well as bringing investors, it will be easy for us to understand the philosophy of success as we will be working with professionals in certain programmes,” Hategekimana said.

Donat Nishyirembere, the in-charge of youth entrepreneurship at the National Youth Council, said the youth can gain from the incubation network to shape their ideas.

“The National Youth Council commits to support this initiative as we believe it will ensure access to the global markets and increase capacity for youth; and they will be able to take their businesses to another level,” said Nishyirembere.

Pacifique Uwineza, the chairperson of chamber for youth entrepreneurs at the Private Sector Federation, said through networking, the youth will learn from each other in terms of job creation.

City of Kigali Supports Women Cooperatives

By Olivia Muragijimana

City of Kigali has offered Rwf30 million financial support to 12 women cooperatives, four from each of the city’s three districts, to boost their businesses which have been struggling.

The grant beneficiaries are farming and tailoring cooperatives as well as smallholder businesses operating in the City of Kigali.

Each of the 12 cooperatives was given Rwf2.8 million at a public function on Tuesday.

Aurore Umuhoza, the National Women Council coordinator in the City of Kigali, said: “Most of the cooperatives need support but in each district we only chose four cooperatives. We considered the cooperatives that have all the requirements of Rwanda Cooperatives Agency, have at least spent one year operating as well as those with capital of at least Rwf50,000 of their own and ability to continue work so that this capital we added them is not wasted.”

“Many of the cooperatives were folding, which would lead their members to go back to street vending since most of them were previously street vendors. We hope that this support will propel them to self-reliance and reduce street children since most of these street children come from such families.”

Marie Chantal Musanabera, head of Gikondo-based bakery cooperative called ‘Twiyubake Twihesha Agaciro’, said their cooperative was started by young women who had dropped out of high school.

“We had an idea of running a bakery business but we didn’t have enough money. Now it’s a dream come true as this support is a great boost,” she told The New Times.

Languid Nyirabahire, Gasabo vice mayor in charge of social affairs, said the grant is part of efforts to solve the problem street vending.

Rwanda

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Mengo Kakeeka Home of Idi Amin’s Former Armoury

Photo: Colleb Mugume/Daily Monitor

The area has turned into a busy commercial and residential area due to the influx of students.

analysisBy Shiffa Kulanyi

Despite Mengo Kakeeka’s close proximity to the capital, most Ugandans are not aware of its history.

The area harbors Idi Amin’s former armoury, though its former location is now occupied by Muteesa University. Buganda kingdom’s old sub-county headquarters were also located in the space that Buganda Royal Institute currently occupies.

The name Kakeeka, which loosely translates into a mat was derived from the first visitors in the area, who noticed a football ground that resembled a mat. “It was among the few football grounds in Buganda and Uganda at the time,” says Nicholas Ssewagudde, the area chairman.

Mengo Kakeeka is a sub-county in Rubaga Division. To the north, it lies on the borderline between the north and south constituency of Rubaga, and it is surrounded by Rubaga hospital to the south. It was initially a residential area but has since revolved into a commercial hub.

This is attributed to the educational institutions that have been set up consequently attracting businesses to serve the growing populace with students as the target audience.

Kakeeka is home to a number of educational institutions including Ndejje University law post graduate branch, Muteesa and Pencostal University, two Institutes; Buganda Royal Vocational I, and Radio, Television and Filming institute, one daycare-linear, Redrock and Kisakye Primary Schools.

“Businesses include but not limited to garages, metal fabrication shops, stationaries, hostels, boutiques, and bars. These have been set up to cater for the population that has since increased from 350 to 1,500 people as per the previous Kakeeka voters’ register.” Mr Ssewagudde says.

Buying land and renting

“During my time as chairman, I have not officiated over the sale of any piece of land because the land in the area is mostly owned by the Catholic church and families that have lived in the area for ages. It is very rare for any of them to sell,” said Mr Ssewangudde.

Houses in the area are very pricy, which residents attribute to the area’s close proximity to the capital and the large student population. To rent a one-bedroom house, you need to pay between Shs150,000 and Shs200,000 per month.

Hostels single rooms cost Shs450,000 and Shs600,000 while double rooms go for Shs750,000-Shs900,000 per semester. A three bedroom house costs Shs1m and over.

“The general road network has improved over the years. Kampala City Council Authority recently completed works on Kakeeka road, the major road in the area. For those intending to rent here, our proximity to the capital Kampala is an added advantage,” he says.

Infrastructure

“Most of the structures in the area were previously residential but have been turned into rentals or hostels to cater for the populace that mainly comprises of students. The former army shop was later turned into Buganda Royal Institute after Buganda Kingdom repossessed its land from government. When the institute found a new home, it was replaced by Muteesa University,” the chairman says.

Security

“Kakeeka has two black spots where lawbreakers commonly gather to plot mischief and take drugs,” Mr Ssewagudde says, adding: However, security has tremendously improved over the years and we are working closely with police to fight insecurity.”

Mr David Lutaaya, a technician and resident, describes security in the area as ‘relative’. He says before Muteesa University was constructed at the former armoury, ammunition that had been left behind was spread all over the place and a number of bombs used to go off, adding that a friend of his, Annet lost her leg in one of the blasts.

Quick fact

The area harbors Idi Amin’s former armoury. Buganda kingdom’s sub-county headquarters were also located in the space that Buganda Royal Institute currently occupies.

From Candida to Byamukama, a Portrait of Torture Drawn in Blood-Stained Paint

columnBy Daniel K. Kalinaki

On May 11, 1999 this newspaper published, on its back page, a photograph of two soldiers forcefully shaving a woman’s pubic hair. A few days later Candida Lakony, 24, came forward and claimed it was she in the photograph and that the dirty deed had been carried out in Gulu barracks.

The outrage was universal. Women activists were apoplectic. Usually calm folks shook with indignation. Of course, the NRA was not without blemish, as tales from the Bush War and post-war counter-insurgency operations showed.

Yet the photo was disturbing for we now had a new progressive Constitution, an elected government and the army had even changed its name to UPDF; such excesses were supposed to be things of the past. Secondly, there was something troublingly mundane about the photograph. This wasn’t a rebel or a mass murderer; it was a small helpless woman and the soldiers in the picture seemed to be doing it simply because they could. It was impunity by a thousand scissor snips.

The President met Candida, offered sympathies and promised to investigate and severely punish the errant officers. The story was not to have a happy ending; Candida and her lawyer failed to prove it was she in the photograph. She was jailed for giving false information to the police and died soon after her release.

This history offers important background and context to the current outrage and umbrage over torture, the latest being that of Geoffrey Byamukama, the Mayor of Kamwenge Town Council, and others arrested in connection with the murder of three police officers earlier this year.

What moves a man (they are often, but not always men) to drive a nail into another man’s kneecap or tie a low-hanging brick to their crown jewels? When Candidagate broke, many people swore by the last hairs on their heads, that it wasn’t and couldn’t be UPDF soldiers; why is it that almost 20 years few have any doubts about whodunit?

People who have studied the psychology of torture have found that most torturers are initially reluctant. Then they receive official encouragement to “go on, smash in that kneecap”, followed by peer encouragement, say of who can pull out a fingernail faster using a pair of pliers. Before long, they begin to dehumanise their victims, lose all inhibitions (this is where they come up with increasingly cruel and imaginative ways of causing pain), before torture becomes a self-perpetuating way of institutional life. The key to stopping the bleeding is to stop official encouragement of torture.

The Candida episode, regardless of the veracity of the photograph, was an opportunity to draw the line under any form of torture or human rights violations. It was missed. Instead, the 2001 elections opened the Pandora’s Box, saw the emergence of the ironically named ‘Safe Houses’ and allowed for torture to become a last-and-oftentimes-first resort for security operatives.

Initially it was meted out to suspected rebels and sympathisers, then to terror suspects, onto political opponents, and loud-mouthed journalists. Now if someone owes you money and refuses to pay you can extract it, together with a pound of flesh from any part of their body, if you have the right thug in security to call.

We are not yet at the Idi Amin stage where a security operative could ‘disappear you’ if you refused to smile as he took your girlfriend away from you in the bar, but we are frogmarching our way there, one ‘superficial injury’ at a time.

President Museveni, to his credit, has written to his security chiefs over the latest torture revelations to point out that the practice is “unnecessary and wrong”. However, the President appears more concerned about the limited efficacy of torture as an evidence-gathering tool and advises, almost in passing, that it “must not be used again if it was being used as I see some groups claiming in the media”.

The President should do more to condemn torture in all its forms; it is morally repugnant, illegal and unjustified. He should call for an independent inquiry into this and other cases of torture, human rights violations and extra-judicial killings, of which there have been plenty, punish perpetrators and compensate victims.

If those who authorise and conduct torture only receive a slap to their wrists then history will consign this government to the dark, bloodstained prison cells of violent impunity, to suffer the company of the Obote and Amin regimes. As a proverb from northern Uganda says, the teeth may smile but the heart does not forget.

Mr Kalinaki is a Ugandan journalist based in Nairobi.

Ghana: Fishermen Apologize to Minister

press release

The Greater Accra branch of the Ghana National Canoe Fishermen Council has apologized to the Minister for Fisheries and Aquaculture Development for the behavior shown by their fellow fishermen during the inauguration of the Fisheries Watch Volunteers at Ada.

Addressing a news conference in Accra, yesterday, the Secretary of the Council, Nene Tetteh Siaw IV of New Ningo, described as appalling the attitude portrayed by some fisher folks at the event, adding that they could have used a different medium to address their displeasure.

A statement read by Nene Siaw indicated that the fishing sector employed over 2.7million people who represented 10 per cent of the country’s population and that it was worrying that some fishing activities posed danger to the sea.

It observed that some fishermen used light, DDT and carbide as bait to catch fish from the sea, a situation, he said, had led to long hours as well as many days to get the current low catch.

According to the statement, the Council, over the years, had collaborated with Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development and the Fisheries Commission to come up with policies and strategies that would engender responsible and sustainable fishing practices and commended the Ministry for their continuous support.

In his remarks, the Chairman of the Ghana National Canoe Fishermen Council for Greater Accra, Nii Akpo Djamlodja VI, disclosed that the Council employed Ghanaians to report fishermen who sold fishes that were caught with light or chemicals to help stop such menace.

Nii Djamlodja, therefore, urged the Fisheries Enforcement Unit to intensify patrol operations and seize canoes used for light fishing.

Source: ISD (Chantal Aidoo & Aliyah Bayali)

Ghana

New Task Force to Inspect Fishing Vessels Launched

An eight-member Task Force that will enforce fisheries law and regulations has been inaugurated in Accra. Read more »

Why Police Should Not Cover Up Torture

editorial

Police have announced a creative way they hope will placate Ugandans outraged by increasing cases of blatant torture of suspects in custody.

According to the Force’s spokesman Asan Kasingye, errant officers will be paraded before journalists to account in person for their roles.

Torture is both unconstitutional and criminal.

Article 24 of the (amended) 1995 Constitution states that “no person shall be subjected to any form of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment”.

Kamwenge Town Council chairman Geoffrey Byamukama has become the new poster child of State brutality. Police officers arrested and held him incommunicado for a month during which they crippled and left him with eye-sore and frightening injuries. Like him, other suspects incarcerated over the March 17 killing of ex-police spokesman Andrew Felix Kaweesi, his driver and guard limped in court with damaged feet or wounded torso. Just how cruel!

They alleged that they were tortured at Nalufenya detention centre to confess.

These despicable deeds of borderless viciousness by police draw parallels with the ignominy of Guantanamo Bay where US interrogators wantonly abused suspects detained over the 9/11 attacks.

We espouse the State’s responsibility to keep citizens safe by preventing crime, arresting and prosecuting and punishing criminals as by law established.

Persecuting individuals as is being done by police, and other state agents, is abhorrent and must not only be countenanced but also punished.

The Prevention and Prohibition of Torture Act, 2012, imposes up to seven-year imprisonment penalty on anyone convicted for torture and makes individual officers liable for commissions in official capacity.

Section 10 of this Act holds superiors responsible for tortures committed by subordinates if the supervisor knew, or consciously disregarded information, which clearly indicated, that the subordinate was committing or about to commit an act of torture. This is instructive. Police officers in the command chain up to the Inspector General of Police Kale Kayihura, who have administrative control over the errant officers at Nalufenya, must bear responsibility.

We welcome President Museveni’s May 15 three-point guidance to security and intelligence chiefs that torture as a tactic of interrogation is valueless because a wrong or innocent person could be victimised; that someone is likely to admit guilt just to be spared pains of torture; and, it diverts interrogators away from meticulous pursuit of the truth.

These common sense issues should constitute standard operating procedures for our security forces.

Our resolute position is that, rather than the self-edifying manoeuvre to parade implicated officers to account on camera, police must altogether stop torturing suspects.

Uganda

States Split On Funding Mechanisms to Bail Out EAC

East African Community (EAC) partner states are divided on the proposed financing mechanisms to bail out the… Read more »

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