Posts tagged as: citizen

Doctors Blocked From Kenya, Told to Report in 2 Weeks

Photo: The Citizen

Doctors during operation (file photo).

By John Namkwahe

Few days after President John Magufuli ordered employment, locally, of 258 doctors who initially registered to work in Kenya, the government on Friday published the names of doctors and areas where they have been posted.

Notice issued by the government asked the doctors to report to their respective duty stations within 14 days from the date of the announcement.

Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children Dr Mpoki Ulisubsya indicated in a statement that some of doctors will work under President’s Office Regional Administration and Local Government and others will be under the ministry.

According to the statement, the doctors have been directed to report with their original birth certificates, original secondary education certificates, their professional certificates, certificates issued by Medical Council of Tanzania and two passport size photos.

According to the government plans, doctors aged below 45 years will be offered permanent contracts they will be directly enrolled in the pension fund while those aged above 45 will be offered a two year contract employment which can be renewed.

Tanzania

Magufuli Fires 9,932 Civil Servants

President John Magufuli has instantly sacked 9,932 workers who have been found using fake certificates. Read more »

Tanzania: Doctors Blocked From Kenya, Told to Report in 2 Weeks

Photo: The Citizen

Doctors during operation (file photo).

By John Namkwahe

Few days after President John Magufuli ordered employment, locally, of 258 doctors who initially registered to work in Kenya, the government on Friday published the names of doctors and areas where they have been posted.

Notice issued by the government asked the doctors to report to their respective duty stations within 14 days from the date of the announcement.

Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children Dr Mpoki Ulisubsya indicated in a statement that some of doctors will work under President’s Office Regional Administration and Local Government and others will be under the ministry.

According to the statement, the doctors have been directed to report with their original birth certificates, original secondary education certificates, their professional certificates, certificates issued by Medical Council of Tanzania and two passport size photos.

According to the government plans, doctors aged below 45 years will be offered permanent contracts they will be directly enrolled in the pension fund while those aged above 45 will be offered a two year contract employment which can be renewed.

Tanzania

Magufuli Fires 9,932 Civil Servants

President John Magufuli has instantly sacked 9,932 workers who have been found using fake certificates. Read more »

Tanzania: Blocked Kenya Bound Doctors Ordered to Report Within 14 Days

Photo: The Citizen

Doctors during operation (file photo).

By John Namkwahe

Few days after President John Magufuli ordered employment, locally, of 258 doctors who initially registered to work in Kenya, the government on Friday published the names of doctors and areas where they have been posted.

Notice issued by the government asked the doctors to report to their respective duty stations within 14 days from the date of the announcement.

Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children Dr Mpoki Ulisubsya indicated in a statement that some of doctors will work under President’s Office Regional Administration and Local Government and others will be under the ministry.

According to the statement, the doctors have been directed to report with their original birth certificates, original secondary education certificates, their professional certificates, certificates issued by Medical Council of Tanzania and two passport size photos.

According to the government plans, doctors aged below 45 years will be offered permanent contracts they will be directly enrolled in the pension fund while those aged above 45 will be offered a two year contract employment which can be renewed.

Tanzania

Magufuli Fires 9,932 Civil Servants

President John Magufuli has instantly sacked 9,932 workers who have been found using fake certificates. Read more »

Govt Warns Investors to Follow Country’s Labour Laws

Photo: The Citizen

Construction workers in Tanzania.

By Rose Athumani

Dodoma — The government, yesterday, sternly warned investors who do not observe the country’s labour laws, including blacklisting workers and using humiliating methods when searching their employees.

The Deputy Minister in the Prime Minister’s Office (Policy, Parliamentary Affairs, Labour, Employment, Youth and the Disabled), Mr Anthony Mavunde, said his office has received numerous complaints of workers being humiliated during searching, while some are blacklisted, making it difficult for them to get work in other mines.

“When investors express interest to invest in the country, they are usually availed information on the country’s laws and regulations. Mr Mavunde said labour laws do not allow blacklisting of workers or using humiliating methods to search them such as making them strip and inspect their private parts.

“This is violation of human rights and measures will be taken against those found doing this.” The Deputy Minister was responding to a supplementary question from Joyce Mukya (Special Seats–Chadema) who wanted to know if there was an alternative method of searching workers instead of humiliating them such as what is currently being done at Tanzanite One in Arusha.

More on This

Tanzania Warns Investors to Follow Country’s Labour Laws


Tanzania Among Top Countries for Investment

Mr Mavunde confirmed that he received such reports when he visited Tanzanite One in Arusha and issued directives, and a report by a committee formed to investigate mines in the country will shade more light on weather that method is still being used or not.Earlier, the Deputy Minister said his office continues to oversee implementation of labour laws through conducting inspections at workplace. “Labour law education is also dispensed to workers and workers’ unions in an effort to increase their knowledge on the issue.Measures have been taken including dragging to court, employers who go against the laws,” he explained. Mr Mavunde was responding to a basic question from John Kadutu (Ulyankulu – CCM), who wanted to know when the government will conduct inspection of contracts of companies contracted by mines and if the government will remove employers who humiliate their employees.The Deputy Minister said the government formed a taskforce comprising officers from the PMO, National Social Security Fund, Social Security Regulatory Authority, OSHA, Tanzania Revenue Authority and Tanzania Minerals Audit Agency (TMAA) to conduct in-depth assessment on whether labour laws are being implemented, among other issues, in the Lake Zone and Northern mines.”The government recognizes the importance of investors in increasing job opportunities to Tanzanians as well as contributing to the country’s economic growth. We will continue to ensure labour laws are implemented at workplaces,” he stressed.More on ThisTanzania Among Top Countries for Investment

Tanzania has featured in a list of top ten most attractive for investment flowing destination into African… Read more »

Rwandan Genocide Convict in Hot Water

By Zulfa Musa

Arusha — A former convict of the disbanded International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), who was arrested recently in Kagera Region by Immigration officers while attempting to cross into Burundi, has been taken to Dar es Salaam for further interrogations.

Immigration officer Abdallah Tiwo told The Citizen from Bukoba yesterday that the former captain of the Rwanda army is being questioned as to why he travelled out of Arusha without special travel documents.

He added that Innocent Sagahutu, who was arrested two weeks ago, was found without valid documents at the border with Burundi while trying to get into the neighbouring country from Ngara District.

He recently completed a 15-year jail sentence for his role in the 1994 genocide in Rwanda where about a million people were massacred after the killing of president Juvenal Habyarimana on April 6, 1994.

He is among scores of the Rwanda nationals who were indicted by the ICTR and either served their jail terms or were acquitted but have not found a country to host them because they feared returning home.

For the past two weeks he had been held for interrogation in Bukoba but has now been transferred to the Immigration headquarters.

An Immigration officer in Bukoba told The Citizen last week that Sagahutu and other ex-convicts needed special clearance to travel out of Arusha. They are currently living in a special UN detention facility in Arusha.

However, when contacted by The Citizen, Sagahutu said the matter has been blown out of proportion because he had documents and was cleared by the UN offices in Tanzania to travel to Burundi to see his relatives.

He even claimed that he used the same clearance permits to travel to Mozambique and Switzerland recently “without any problem or causing harm to anybody”.

Tanzania

Gold Regains Status As Tanzania’s Top Export

Gold has regained its prestigious position as Tanzania’s largest non-traditional goods export, thanks to a rise in value… Read more »

Govt Expels United Nations Development Programme Boss

Photo: Saumu Mwalimu/The Citizen

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Awa Dabo

The Tanzania government’s expulsion of a top UN diplomat continues to raise questions and criticism.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs Tuesday said Ms Awa Dabo was expelled over sour relations with members of staff of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) where she was the Country Director.

A statement from the ministry indicated that Ms Dabo’s stay was also untenable over her management and leadership which affected UNDP’s work in Tanzania.

The government explanation came as reports began to circulate over the expulsion of the Gambian national, who was posted to the role towards the end of 2015.

“The government has directed the UNDP office in Tanzania to remove the country director Ms Awa Dabo. The decision was arrived at following misunderstanding between her and other staff and management of the organisation which has led to deterioration of its work,” read the statement released by the Foreign ministry’s information department.

According to the government, Ms Babo’s continued stay in Tanzania would have impacted the work of UNDP to help develop the country.

There was no immediate reaction from the UNDP office and it was also not clear when exactly the diplomat was asked to leave.

More on This

Tanzania Expels UN Development Programme Boss


Govt Explains Why It Ordered Deportation of UNDP BossUNDP Boss Deportation Lands in Parliament

Tuesday media reports suggested Ms Dabo was given 24 hours to leave the country.Speculations have intensified with some quarters quick to link the move to UNDP’s role in the Zanzibar political impasse since the botched General Election in 2015 and the subsequent re-run that was boycotted by the main opposition party, CUF.The opposition claimed it had won the elections before authorities annulled the outcome and ordered a repeat.The government’s relation with development partners who funded a significant part of Zanzibar’s development budget has deteriorated since the elections, with several Western countries openly criticising the manner in which the elections were handled.Ruaha Catholic University Prof Gaudence Mpangala said it would be questionable if the reason given by the government bordered on indiscipline charges against the UNDP boss.”This issue may lead to soured relations between the government and the UN body. I believe UNDP would be the right organisation to take disciplinary action if what the government is saying is to be believed,” said Prof Mpangala.The Executive Director of the Legal and Human Right Centre, Dr Hellen Kijo-Bisimba, said the government should have reported Ms Dabo to her superiors instead of opening a case for strained diplomatic relations through the expulsion.”May be there is a reason but in her position as a representative of the UN body in the country she would stand for justice and not keep quiet should things not go well,” Dr Kijo-Bisimba said.”I would wish for my government not to expel her but report her to the UN because this matter will spoil for us because last year the same thing applied to the representative of UNWOMEN,” she said.In Zanzibar, Mr Ismael Jussa who is CUF’s foreign affairs director told The Citizen he would not be surprised should the reason for Ms Dabo’s expulsion be the political problem in Zanzibar.”It is not a secret that development partners took a particular stand against what happened in Zanzibar but that move would not be the solution,” said Mr Jussa.The matter also found its way to Parliament when an MP raised it but was quickly stopped from tabling it for debate.Mbozi MP Pascal Haonga wanted the government to explain the action.Mr Haonga asked for guidance of the Chairperson, Mr Andrew Chenge, on why the government issued a persona non grata against Ms Dabo over the weekend.Mr Chenge, however, told the House the executive had full autonomy on diplomatic relations and the parliament would not question the decision.

Ex-Institute for Medical Research Boss Speaks for First Time Since Her New Job At WHO

Photo: The Citizen

Former National Institute of Medical Research Director Mwele Malecela.

interview

Geneva — Former Director General of the National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR), Dr Mwele Malecela, speaks exclusively to The Citizen’s Health Reporter Syriacus Buguzi on the sidelines of last week’s global summit on Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) thet took place here. Now working as director in the Office of Africa Regional Director at the World Health Organisation, Dr Malecela speaks to a Tanzanian newspaper for the first time since her appointment to her new position, which she landed five months after she unceremoniously exited from NIMR

I am aware that you have worked on Neglected Tropical Diseases for a long time in Tanzania but now, as new director in the Office of Africa Regional Director-WHO-Afro, what’s your role in connection with this Geneva Summit on NTDs?

Thank you. I am a panelist on a few panels, particularly one that involves a science journal, the Public Library of Sciences on Neglected Tropical Diseases (PLOS, NTDs, I am also chair of the Regional Programme Review Group (RPRG) for NTDs. So, during this summit, I will be speaking on a couple of panels.

I was also on the uniting committee that led to this event. Now as a WHO staff member, I am not really getting involved in the activities that would have been at the core of NTDs, but I am here nonetheless; as a stakeholder in the WHO’s Strategic and Technical Advisory Committee for Neglected Tropical Diseases. I am still very much interested in NTDs.

Talking of NTDs in the Tanzanian context, how neglected are they?

To be honest, in Tanzania I don’t think they are really neglected. There was a time when there was little knowledge of the diseases in terms of their distribution–specifically five of them which have been discussed at length at this NTD summit.

Looking at these diseases in Tanzania, the picture was not clear before the mid-90s. Data was not well-organised and there were no programme-based approaches in dealing with the NTDs. The data was sporadic–showing incidences here and there.

For instance, there was only data showing that Lymphatic Filariaisis was in the Kilombero River Valley, then in certain areas such as the Coast of Tanzania, but there were no concerted efforts to map the whole country to find out the real burden of NTDs.

And, for Lympahtic Filariasis which I have worked on for a long time, there was a time we had to go out in the night–between 10pm and 2am to collect blood samples because that’s the time when the parasites are in the blood circulation, but when diagnostics became available, it became easier to trace the parasites at any time of the day, also the mapping exercise became easier.

Then, the distribution of NTDs became known in Tanzania and it was easier then, to convince policy makers that we really have a problem. Initially, it would have been very difficult to expect policy makers to react to something that was not clear. At this summit, Mr Bill Gates spoke about this concept–of having real measurements of the problem.

That, when we were able to measure, countries were then able to take steps. Saying that the diseases are neglected, it’s a little unfair. In Tanzania, and again I will go back to Lymphatic Filariasis: initially, we used to administer one drug Diethyl Carbamazine (DEC) for Lymphatic Filariasis, alongside other diseases such as Oncocercasiasis but we realised that the drug was causing adverse reactions to the patients with Oncocercasiasis.

So we could not continue using this drug in areas where there was Oncocercasiasis. Later, when we got the right drugs, such as Mectizan and Albendazole, which were donated, then we moved forward. Then at that time, there was a World Health Assembly Resolution which brought together all the member states in 1997, to embark on eliminating Lympatic Filarisis.

All this brought up a global commitment towards dealing with some of the NTDs. With all that momentum, then countries began their own programmes, most of which started after the 1997 WHO resolution. So, to say “neglected” is a little bit too much of a broad statement for things that have been unfolding in a chronological manner.

Is there any way, your roles at WHO entail extending services to Tanzania? How do your efforts trickle down to your country?

(Little laughter). Well, that’s somehow difficult to explain–and a little bit controversial.

Why controversial? It’s difficult to say. You see, what I do, eventually trickles down to all African countries–Tanzania included. What one is supposed to be (when serving at the level of WHO–Afro) is to become “citizen of Africa” or rather, a “citizen of the world.”

But there must be a way you represent your country. How about that?

Mmm! I am now a Tanzanian who is serving the African Continent. It’s a precious opportunity that has been accorded to me to serve the Continent.

This was a dream of our founding leaders such as Mwalimu Julius Nyerere and Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana. In the spirit of pan-Africanism; I am really glad to be in this position. I really desired to continue serving back home in my country but this opportunity I got at WHO-Afro gives me another chance to serve at the continental level.

That’s indeed inspiring. And I hope it keeps alive your long-held dream of becoming the President of Tanzania. Correct?

(Laugher… ) That’s a controversial one. Uh! We can speak on that one off record. (She continues laughing)

Okay then; but looking back 5 to 10 years, what do you think you could have done differently–or in fact better for Tanzania in the control of NTDs?

Ten years ago, that was around 2007. We were at the point of integrating the NTDs at that time, so, I don’t think there is anything I could have done differently. Five year ago, there was in fact a better story to tell of the efforts invested–work had picked up already.

But, if you would ask me 20 years ago, there were many things I could have done differently. By 2009, many things had been done; Tanzania had been well represented at the London Declaration of NTDs. And, we had already made tremendous steps in terms of scaling up the programmes and now we have reached this stage–like we have heard during this summit–where countries are making commitments to eliminate the NTDs in many countries, including Tanzania.

It seems to me that about 20 years ago, the fight against NTDs was still at infancy, that’s when you think you could have intervened better, right?

Yes. Because 20 years ago, I would have talked about integrating the NTD programmes at that time. I would have said let’s put them together under one umbrella. In Tanzania, we integrated late–we did this at a time when we realized that it was a long overdue… this was only achieved at around the year 2000. But I think we should have integrated right from the very beginning. However, we went in with strong vertical programs and fortunately, it has worked out.

In fact, part of the achievements is what we see people celebrating since we arrived here in Geneva.

As an experienced researcher on NTDs, what are the available opportunities that you think Tanzania needs to tap into to eliminate the diseases to at least reach that level of elimination that countries such as Togo has attained–to completely be free of Lymphatic Filariasis.

Well, that’s a question that someone at the Ministry of Health in Tanzania can answer better. But I think Tanzania has taken advantage of almost all the available opportunities through annual partners’ meetings and the program manager can say on this better. However, on a serious note, I think areas that need to be tapped into are areas of morbidity control.

This means, the backlog of patients afflicted by NTDs who need support. There are patients with hydrocele who need surgery, those with Trachoma that need trichiasis surgery. Those are the areas that Tanzania would definitely need support from partners.

I have seen that there is a lot being spoken about and done when it comes to mass drug administration (MDA) when it comes to NTD control. But I think there is more on tackling poverty–especially if we are to get to the crux of the problem. What’s you take on this?

I think this is something akin to the chicken-and egg paradox. That, do we tackle poverty first and deal with NTDs later? Or which one has to be solved first? Well, the conclusive remedy to all these diseases, which are in fact diseases of poverty, is socio-economic development.

That’s the best. But before we get there, we have to deal with what is in front of us–the people who are affected by these diseases; who live in cycles of poverty, they are unable to work and in fact contribute to that socio-economic development. But as we deal with this, we should not lose sight of the fact that it’s socio-economic transformation that will bring us to that success story of elimination.

Okay, now let’s speak on the future of research in Tanzania. Do you think the country is making any headway in exposing the true burden of NTDs through research?

I think Tanzania is performing well. There is no problem at all. You see, the issue is about proper use of data that has been obtained in making policy decisions. That’s where the problem lies–and this is for many African countries. But I have no doubt about the ability of our scientists in collecting data and doing all the mapping.

You have been involved in research activities almost half of your life, you can now foresee Tanzania’s status in research?

It’s true, I have been in research since I was a young girl and I do believe there is a room for Tanzania to excel in research. Health research is making very good progress. This I have seen. The key issue is on making sure there is more collaboration.

What kind of collaboration do we need to work on now–between research institutions and the government?

No. Not really. I mean collaboration among the research institutions themselves–and the academia. And this entails using the comparative advantages that such institutions have in making research better.

You have interacted with the media in Tanzania. How is the media driving the research agenda? Or in other words, what’s your experience with how media reports on research?

Mmm! I think the biggest problem with the media in Tanzania, is that there is an obvious lack of skills among the journalists on how to report what we researchers do.

And, unfortunately when they can’t do it perfectly, we (the researchers) tend to unfairly blame them–and then we sit back and say, “We don’t want to speak to them anymore”. Right now (in Tanzania), there is almost like a “freeze”–of not many people not wanting to speak to the media because of the feeling that what they speak might be misconstrued and at times taken out of context.

I think, at this point, as a country we need to build the skills of our journalists to be able to report on certain fields through specialisation. Let’s have journalists that report on science, technology, medicine and so on. Without this kind of specialisation, we are always going to have problems with the media. Initially, we thought it was okay, as long as the journalists transfer the message, no problem, but once there a problem, the information they send can even ruin careers. This will always create conflict between researchers and the media.

And a true scenario is like what happened when you announced findings on Zika virus in Tanzania? Right?

(Laughter… )… I leave that to you. Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!

Well, but it’s a true story of what really happened. Isn’t it?

(Laugher… ), I mean, we were at the meeting where so many diseases were discussed–we talked about the Ebola vaccine, the HIV vaccines and a wide range of things… but the journalists just decided to blow Zika out of proportion.

So, how bad was that?

(Laugher)… well, at the end of the day someone lost their job.

Well, may be that’s how the media works, but, finally, how do we bridge this gap?

I have nothing against journalists, but what I want to say is that we need to do something.

Without investment into how journalists work with researchers, it’s going to be difficult for researchers to work with the media. The researchers will continue shying away from the media.

because we [researchers] have the obligations to be sure that what we say is accurate, clear and user-friendly. I know that researcher also have the trouble of communicating “clearly” what they do. We need to sort out all those, otherwise, we will always end up in trouble with the media..

Intergrity First – What Politicians Can Learn From Nape

[Citizen] We are told by experienced politicians that, ‘politics is a game of events’, where no established rules may apply. In Tanzania, since Mwalimu Julius Nyerere’s era, when there was political turbulence, particularly in Isles, we used say: ‘the political weather has been polluted,’ just like what happened in Zanzibar in 1984. Today, the political weather can change anytime and affect any politician unexpectedly.

Tanzania: Why Vodacom Share Offer Has Been Extended

By Samuel Kamndaya

Dar es Salaam — Vodacom Tanzania Plc is extending the deadline for its initial public offering (IPO) by three weeks as it seeks to give local investors more time to take part in the share sale.

Vodacom seeks to raise Sh476 billion through sale of its 560 million shares at a price of Sh850 each in the ongoing IPO as the telecommunication firm offloads a 25 per cent stake to the public in compliance with the Electronic and Postal and Communications Act (EPOCA), 2010 as amended by the Finance Act 2016.

The IPO, which officially started on March 9, 2017, was due to close yesterday (April 19) ahead of the company’s listing at the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange (DSE) on May 16. Foreign investors cannot take part in the IPO but can invest after the listing.

“Following consultation with the government and the respective investment communities including Members of Parliament, groups of civil servants and officials of the constituent member organizations of the Tanzania Federation of Cooperatives, we have requested and received approval from the CMSA (Capital Markets and Securities Authority) to extend the offer period by three weeks to Thursday, 11th May 2017,” Vodacom Tanzania director of corporate affairs and public relations Rosalynn Mworia said yesterday.

Signs of a possible extension for the IPO deadline started to show on Wednesday last week when Vodacom Tanzania Plc, CMSA, DSE along with brokers, conducted an awareness seminar to Members of Parliament (MPs) in Dodoma whereby the lawmakers expressed their interest in the share sale, but requested for more time.

Some MPs asked the Speaker of the National Assembly, Mr Job Ndugai, to look into how they could be facilitated with loans to take part in the IPO.

CMSA director of research, policy and planning Nicodemus Mkama said in Dodoma on Wednesday that they would consider extension for the MPs but asked them to keep on communicating.

Orbit Securities general manager Juventus Simon told The Citizen yesterday that with three holidays within the IPO period, it only made sense for them to extend the period.

“The MPs expressed their willingness to take part in the IPO… we have also consulted with a number of retail investors – who are at the epicenter of domestic empowerment as required by the EPOCA – and they were more than willing to take part. Unfortunately, there were holidays as the deadline approached, necessitating the extension,” Mr Simon – whose company was the IPO’s lead transaction advisor – said.

Apart from Karume Day on April 7, the IPO’s activeness may also have been dropped as investors shifted their attention to Easter holidays.

With Monday and Friday reserved for holidays, then Tanzanians – who tend to become more active in various important undertakings as the deadlines approache – had only yesterday to buy the shares. According to Zan Securities Limited CEO Raphael Masumbuko, the IPO has attracted a lot of enthusiasm among retail and institutional investors during the past five weeks, hoping that the trend would continue.

“With the number of investors increasing, it was only fair that the deadline had to be extended. We are hopeful that many more will come,” he told The Citizen yesterday.

With the extension, allotment of shares is now proposed to take place from May 19, while listing at the DSE is scheduled for June 6.

Vodacom’s Sh476 billion is expected to be the highest amount to have been attained through IPO in the history of Tanzania.

In 2012, a total of Sh121.51 billion was attained when East African Breweries Limited (EABL) issued a placement of its 20 per cent stake in Tanzania Breweries Limited Group (TBL).

Similarly, National Microfinance Bank’s IPO – which was issued in 2008 – sought to collect Sh63 billion through the sale of the state’s 21 per cent stake. It was however oversubscribed by 42 per cent.

In 2006, Tanzania Portland Cement Company (TPCC) – which trades as Twiga – issued an IPO in which it sought to raise Sh23.4 billion worth of capital from the public through the sale of authorized 53,975,900 shares. However, the IPO was oversubscribed when a total of Sh92.5 billion was raised.

In 2009, CRDB issued an IPO, seeking to raise Sh18.8 billion through the sale of five per cent of shares for the Danish International Development Agency.

Mr Simon, however, exuded confidence that the money will be raised.

“We are hopeful that it will be oversubscribed as we anticipate an increased number of both retail and institutional investors during the coming three weeks,” he said.

Former Israeli PM Hails Tanzania’s Tourist Attractions

Photo: The Citizen

Serengeti Park Road (file photo).

Former Israel Prime Minister, Ehud Barak has pledged to arrange another tour after being impressed by Tanzania’s unique tourist attractions.

Mr Barak has visited Tanzania amid the fifth government efforts to promote tourism by attracting various tourists from different countries. Last week, President John Magufuli said his government is doing everything in its capacity to strengthen relationship with various countries including Israel and that it is looking forward to open an embassy office in Israel.

Israel has already opened consulate office in Dar es Salaam. While Israeli tourists are frequently visiting Tanzania, mostly for wildlife photographic safaris, there are Tanzanians flying to Israel to visit the holy cities of Jerusalem, Bethlehem, Galilee, and other Christian historical sites.

Early this week former premier, Barak concluded his seven-day memorable tour of Tanzania’s northern tourism circuit, vowing to come back once again to enjoy the rich godsend with which the country is endowed.

Bidding farewell to his host, the managing director of Mauly Tours, Ms Mozzah Mauly, Mr Barak, one of the Israeli’s most storied politicians, said he would like to visit Tanzania once again in the near future. “I had a great time.

Tanzania is a place to visit again,” he noted at Kilimanjaro International Airport (KIA) as he flew back to Tel Aviv on Monday evening. Ms Mozzah, a prominent tour operator with a decade-long experience of handling tourists from Israel, welcomed Mr Barak once again, asking him to become Mauly Tours’ envoy across the globe.

“I hope, this successful tour of the former Prime Minister of Israel will open up the Israel tourism market to Tanzania,” Ms Mozzah said.

Accompanied by 24 people, including his family members, Mr Barak sampled wildlife animals, plant species and landscapes at Serengeti and Manyara national parks as well as at Ngorongoro Conservation Area (NCA). While at the NCA, Mr Barak visited Ngorongoro Crater and the Olduvai Gorge Museum where 58 years ago remains of an early man were discovered.

Just like the Holy Land of Israel, several archaeological research activities are taking place within the NCA and its environs with a view of unraveling the early history of man and pre-historical findings. Various books on the early history of mankind and anthropology at NCA and its historical sites of Olduvai and Laetoli have been compiled.

Mr Barak said the area was very important because it was the cradle of mankind, connecting the early human generations and the latest ones.

Tanzania

Legislators Want Magufuli to Apologise Over His Earthquake Remarks

Opposition lawmakers yesterday took a swipe at President John Magufuli over several of his remarks, arguing that they… Read more »

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