Posts tagged as: bujumbura

U.S.$25 Million Ifad Grant to Boost Burundi Financial Access

By Victor Kiprop

Burundi has signed a deal with the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) that will see vulnerable groups including women and youth access financial services.

The project, dubbed Financial Inclusion in Burundi (PAIFAIR-B), will cost $28.6 million and targets more than 99,000 households in rural areas.

IFAD will provide $24.9 million in form of a grant, while Bujumbura and the beneficiaries will contribute the remaining amount.

The deal was signed in Rome recently by IFAD’s president Gilbert F Houngbo and Burundi’s Minister of Finance, Budget and Privatisation Phil Domitien Ndihokubwayo.

The PAIFAIR-B deal adds to the list of IFAD-funded rural development programmes in Burundi, where the United Nations agency has invested more than $230 million since 1979.

“The project will be rolled out in 17 provinces, and is designed to provide access to financial and other diversified services in order to foster the emergence of a wide range of income-generating enterprises in the agricultural and non-agricultural sectors,” IFAD said.

The demand for financial services in Burundi exceeds the supply, with the majority of agricultural entrepreneurs forced to turn to “loan sharks” who charge exorbitant interest rates of up to 1,000 per cent.

A 2014 report by the global partnership for Financial Inclusion notes that only 12.5 per cent of the country’s adult population have an account in a formal financial institution.

The study blamed the low financial inclusion in the country on lower incomes and financial education and barriers such as lack of motorised transport outside the city of Bujumbura.

Decades of civil wars coupled with a fragile political process and recurrent climatic shocks have slowed economic activity in Burundi, consistently keeping economic growth in the country at below five per cent between 2006 and 2016.

More than 400,000 people had fled the country as at mid-September, according to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), while at least three million Burundians — nearly a quarter of the country’s population — were in need of humanitarian assistance as at January this year.

Burundi

If UN Is to Be Credible, It Must Act Before it’s Too Late

The Burundian government carries the primary responsibility for protecting its citizens from crimes against humanity,… Read more »

Burundi: Gihungwe Residents Demand Compensation for Exploitation of Quarries

By Diane Uwimana

About 54 families from Gihungwe locality in Gihanga commune of Bubanza western province, owners of quarries where small stones are extracted to extend the national road no5-(Bujumbura-Cibitoke) have staged a sit-in this 5 October on the extraction site. They prevented the truck drivers from digging their lands because they have not received their compensation.

“The office in charge of roads promised to equally grant us compensation in vain. The deadline was set yesterday”, says a mother of ten children met on the ground. She says those who hired fields only received compensation for the damage caused by the trucks. “We do not understand why the land owners did not receive any compensation as the lands were their source of revenue”, says a sixty-old man met in Gihungwe locality.

Ernest Ntirabampa, resident and representative of those families says the office in charge of roads and residents have agreed that the lands should be returned to the owners after the extraction. He, however, says there was not any signed document of the agreement contract. “Not only, are we claiming compensation, but also, there isn’t any contract that linked the company that exploited the quarries and their owners,” says Ntirabampa. He says the compensation should be used to hire other fields while they are digging the quarries. “We are waiting for the fixed appointment, if nothing is done till 9 October, the activities of exploiting the quarries will be suspended”, he says.

Léopold Ndayisaba, Administrator of Gihanga Commune says the residents and the agents of the Road office have agreed to meet on Monday, 9 October. “We think we will arrive at a good solution”, he says.

Burundi

Burundi Refugees Stranded in Raging Congolese Combat

INCESSANT clashes between armed groups and government forces in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) have delayed the… Read more »

Fuel Shortage – Users Complain and Government Reassures

By Bella Lucia Nininahazwe

Since last week, gasoline shortage is observed in Bujumbura town. Public transport drivers complain. The Ministry of Energy and Mines reassures gasoline will be available any day.

Once one approaches Kigobe City Oil station, all they can see are long queues of motorcycles, small vehicles of public transport, tricycles commonly referred to as Bajaj, taxis and a few private cars alongside the 28 Novembre boulevard in the North of the capital. The same situation is observed at Kinindo City Oil station as well as at another gas station near Musaga zone in the southern part of the capital Bujumbura.

Some drivers told Iwacu on Tuesday 3 October they had been there since early in the morning, waiting to be served, in vain: “I have been here since 6 AM. I queued and as I was about to be served, gas station attendants said they would give gasoline to those who have purchase order. I am frustrated, how will I survive without it while I have a family to take care of?” said one of them.

Nsabimana Roger, a motorcyclist, says he does not understand how gasoline is kept for those who have purchase order. “How can they tell us that the remaining gasoline is reserved for those who have purchase order while we have been queuing since the morning? This is discrimination,” says Nsabimana.

Léonidas Sindayigaya, spokesperson for the Ministry of Mines and Energy recognises the fuel shortage. He says there are changes in payment methods: “Customs clearance methods have changed. Importers of petroleum products used to pay at the borders but since last Wednesday, they pay from Burundi revenue Authority (OBR) using internet.”

Sindayigaya reassures that the situation will be remedied soon: “Tomorrow or after tomorrow the problem will be solved .There is much fuel coming and users will be supplied with gasoline soon.”

Jean Mvuyekure, spokesperson for OBR disclaims any custom clearance problem.

As for Gabriel Rufyiri, chairperson of the corruption watchdog (OLUCOME), the government should accept that there is a problem as this shortage keeps on recurring: “Though the government keeps on reassuring that there is fuel, it is clear that there is a repetitive shortage.”

Rufyiri suggests that there should be overall strategies to put an end to gasoline shortage as it hampers the country’s economy.

Only three gasoline stations all over the town are said to have fuel. Two of them are only distributing oil to those who have purchase order.

Burundi

UNHCR Appeals for Funds to Help Burundian Refugees

The UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, and partner agencies have made an international appealed for $429 million (approx.… Read more »

Burundi Today, Like Yesterday, Needs Sauti Sol

opinionBy Roland Rugero

If the youth of Burundi are deprived of the opportunity to sing together for hope, where then should they go?

Dear Ketty, I read with consternation your open letter to Sauti Sol not to perform in Burundi to prevent the government from taking advantage of the infamous Kenyan band to legitimise their power.

Your narrative, which was very refined as usual, first reminded me of the harsh condition of being a refugee. Like you, I also fled Burundi twice: in October 1993, and then four months later when there was a genocide in Rwanda while our native country lost its second president over Kanombe Airport.

I spent five years in total as mkimbizi (“refugee” in Kiswahili) in Rwanda and Tanzania. In those days, we were fleeing from Bujumbura and the fury of hatred that had once again wracked our country. The macabre cycle kept looping back: I’m afraid of you, so I kill you; your people kill mine for revenge; and then we kill each other until…

So I, too, would sit on the cliffs of Mujimwema in Kigoma, staring at the undulating blue waters of Lake Tanganyika looking northward and cursing the rare, joyful news that reached us from Burundi. How could one still marry in a country where people were killed by adorning their necks with a burning tire or by machete? How was it possible to listen to 2Pac while in Bujumbura Rural displaced people were being rounded up and sent to death camps? How were there still dance gatherings while young people were being massacred? At that time, we did not have blogs or Facebook to proclaim our anger to the Universe.

Our brothers and sisters experienced this repulsion and the silence of the world after 1988. As did our parents after 1972 in refugee camps in Rwanda, Tanzania, in Mobutu’s country or in exile in Brussels.

This is one of the hard conditions of exile in Burundi as elsewhere, today as always. Any news that comes to blame, discredit or expose the evil or failures of those in power is celebrated. It is no longer even newsworthy. It is the truth. Conversely, any news likely to bring a little colour to the life of the country that we fled is rejected. Lest it reveal a little humanity on the part of the oppressor.

So your request that Sauti Sol refrain from performing in Burundi for fear Bujumbura will take advantage of it seemed understandable to me at first. Those who had fled Burundi in 1993 were suffocating with anger upon hearing that Kidum, the son of Kinama, was performing in 1999 for peace in Bujumbura at the invitation of President Buyoya.

But dear elder sister, another characteristic of exile is that all information about the motherland is distorted by the physical and emotional distance created between you and the native land.

So I will tell you briefly what I saw Friday before last, at Sauti Sol’s concert.

In the first place, there were many teenagers, some who came with their parents, others who had been dropped off , and those who had sneaked out to see the four Kenyans with their own eyes. In addition to Burundian, Kenyan and Chinese officials, there were even expatriates who did not want to show off by purchasing VIP tickets, but preferred to pay 10,000 BFI ($6) as everyone else.

There were also many young city dwellers, some of whom I had glimpsed at the last gospel concert, Pamoja Festival. And there were other music lovers who knew how to imitate Bien-Aimé, Chimano, Savara and Otieno as much in Swahili as in English, while laughing with Farious in Kirundi.

All around, people were eating Burundian goat meat on skewers, patting each other on the back and giving each other kisses.

In attendance were those who support the current government, those obliged to put up with it, those who do not give a damn if they can be left alone, and those who hate it more or less secretly. Yet we lifted our hands together in singing Nerea with Sauti Sol. We sang to clear our minds or because we like the band or because it is always good to discover new things.

That is the beauty of art, and you know it, dear poet: it unites.

But your request for Sauti Sol not to sing for us in Burundi divides.

It draws a line between the Burundians who remain inside the country, guilty of remaining with the one whom you define as the oppressor, and those outside, the victims. So Sauti Sol should not have performed just in Bujumbura: the morality that you ask them to follow invites them to go to Mahama, Nyarugusu, Kamanyola, and Nakivale.

Dear elder sister, there are no Burundians from within and those from outside. We are all sons of the same Man, as we say in Kirundi. Wherever we are, we are condemned to live together, whether we like it or not, whether our leaders understand it or not.

Sincerely, I expected you to invite Sauti Sol to perform in Bujumbura and in the refugee camps. In the face of the half-million refugees you mentioned, I did not expect you to deny the ten million Burundians in the country the potential joy of listening to Kuliko jana, even if the financial means of the overwhelming majority did not allow them to attend.

All those who stayed in Burundi are not there because they adore power. Far from it. We are here, above all, because circumstances make us prefer to remain in Burundi. We are fully aware that politicians will always want to divert every person’s presence and every image in their favour. This is part of their job, in Burundi as in Canada. But we will stay in the country, and if Sauti Sol comes back again and we can afford the ticket and transport, we will sing Africa again.

Because in our world, there are enough things that divide and few that unite. You mention the crimes against humanity committed in Burundi since 2015 and revealed by the investigations of UN Experts. It is a commendable path to look for accountability when facing human rights crimes. If you were to come back and walk through the streets you describe in your letter, you would see in the gaze of orphans – of 1965, 1972, 1984, 1988, 1993, 1996, 2000, 2010 – so many other questions about exclusion, tortures, death, broken dreams.

It is not only half a million refugees who need justice in Burundi. There are ten or eleven million Burundians who would demand justice, if most had not admitted that justice no longer exists on Earth.

Because Burundi is sick of its history. And it is not the International Criminal Court that will cure the country. It will divide it more. But that’s another chapter, of little importance here.

Burundi is sick of its history. From exclusion. From “or”. I know you as a poet, a mother. It was you who introduced me to Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Cheikh-Anta Diop. Let us sing the “and” with Sauti Sol for one night.

It is true that young people across Africa are forcing their leaders to rethink their practice of power. But this is not a new trend: Rwagasore was 29 years old when he was assassinated for standing for our Independence. On our continent and elsewhere, young people have always been able to bring a breath of fresh air to their countries by first being able to unite.

And however humanist the breath of our letters or our marches are, it is impossible to unite if we exclude some under the guise of ensuring the rights of others.

History is demanding, hideous, and its splashes over all our daily lives, often without our knowledge. For Burundi, it did not start with 2015.

That is why, today as yesterday, inside and outside, Burundi needs the Sauti Sols and Kidums of this world. In Nerea, our Kenyan brothers sing: “Let this baby live, maybe in the future it will be Mandela, Nyerere, Lupita… “

In a country as poor and beautiful as Burundi, if you deny young people the rare opportunity to sing together for hope, where, then, should they go?

Your brother.

Lack of Energy and Foreign Currencies Limits Exportation

By Lorraine Josiane Manishatse

Investment Promotion Agency (API) calls on economic operators to promote the export of Burundi products. Exporters say the lack of foreign currencies and electricity are a big challenge to exportation.

“Burundi’s trade balance has deteriorated from $ 366 million in 2007 to a worse situation of less than $ 730 million in 2015,” said Didace Ngendakumana, General Director of Investment Promotion Agency (API) in an awareness-raising workshop for exporters on Wednesday, 27 September.

He said the economic balance of Burundi has long been in deficit. “Worse is that the trend shows a steady fall,” he said.

Following the suspension of the European Union direct financial aid to Burundi in March 2016, the country suffers a lack of foreign currencies and thus imported products increase.

Ngendakumana calls on economic operators to engage more in the export of Burundian products. “We call on them to improve the quality and quantity of Burundian products to be competitive on the international market,” said Ngendakumana. For him, economic operators should take advantage of the opportunities offered by the East African Community (EAC) and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) of which Burundi is a member.

Ambassador Gasunzu Pascal, a potential exporter, said the lack of electricity is a major export challenge in Burundi.

“Export means production or industrialization. But, above all, we need energy. Machines cannot operate without power. Production depends on energy, “Gasunzu said.

The Burundian Company in charge of supplying water and electricity [REGIDESO] recently launched an opening of a 20 megawatt thermal power plant to solve the problem of regular power cut that the people of Bujumbura were faced with since the past few months.

For Ambassador Gasunzu, the addition of 20 megawatts to the quantity of electricity that the whole country uses will help address the energetic deficit that has been negatively impacting lives of Burundians especially those living in the capital Bujumbura.

For thirty years, no hydroelectric dam has been built despite the enlargement of the city and the development of the industrial sector, according to Gasunzu.

Mauritius Nduwimana, Manager of “IMENA” factory which produces banana juice in other types of drinks in Kayanza province, accuses the Central Bank (BRB) of not facilitating exporters.”When we export our goods, we deposit the money in foreign currency to BRB and the latter gives us Burundi francs on the official rate, but if we want to import raw materials, BRB refuses to give us the foreign currencies. So, we buy them on the black market at an exorbitant price, “said Nduwimana.

Today, a US dollar costs BIF 1735 at the official rate while it costs BIF 2900 on the black market.

For Ambassador Gasunzu, BRB should take necessary measures to facilitate exporters who need to import raw materials because they are the ones who bring in foreign currencies.

An adviser to the central bank said BRB prioritizes importers of drugs, chemical fertilizers and fuel over others when it comes to giving foreign currency.

Gasunzi finds, however, that BRB should give the entrepreneur the capital he has used and allocate the benefit to other useful purposes.

Burundi: Lack of Energy and Foreign Currencies Limits Exportation

By Lorraine Josiane Manishatse

Investment Promotion Agency (API) calls on economic operators to promote the export of Burundi products. Exporters say the lack of foreign currencies and electricity are a big challenge to exportation.

“Burundi’s trade balance has deteriorated from $ 366 million in 2007 to a worse situation of less than $ 730 million in 2015,” said Didace Ngendakumana, General Director of Investment Promotion Agency (API) in an awareness-raising workshop for exporters on Wednesday, 27 September.

He said the economic balance of Burundi has long been in deficit. “Worse is that the trend shows a steady fall,” he said.

Following the suspension of the European Union direct financial aid to Burundi in March 2016, the country suffers a lack of foreign currencies and thus imported products increase.

Ngendakumana calls on economic operators to engage more in the export of Burundian products. “We call on them to improve the quality and quantity of Burundian products to be competitive on the international market,” said Ngendakumana. For him, economic operators should take advantage of the opportunities offered by the East African Community (EAC) and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) of which Burundi is a member.

Ambassador Gasunzu Pascal, a potential exporter, said the lack of electricity is a major export challenge in Burundi.

“Export means production or industrialization. But, above all, we need energy. Machines cannot operate without power. Production depends on energy, “Gasunzu said.

The Burundian Company in charge of supplying water and electricity [REGIDESO] recently launched an opening of a 20 megawatt thermal power plant to solve the problem of regular power cut that the people of Bujumbura were faced with since the past few months.

For Ambassador Gasunzu, the addition of 20 megawatts to the quantity of electricity that the whole country uses will help address the energetic deficit that has been negatively impacting lives of Burundians especially those living in the capital Bujumbura.

For thirty years, no hydroelectric dam has been built despite the enlargement of the city and the development of the industrial sector, according to Gasunzu.

Mauritius Nduwimana, Manager of “IMENA” factory which produces banana juice in other types of drinks in Kayanza province, accuses the Central Bank (BRB) of not facilitating exporters.”When we export our goods, we deposit the money in foreign currency to BRB and the latter gives us Burundi francs on the official rate, but if we want to import raw materials, BRB refuses to give us the foreign currencies. So, we buy them on the black market at an exorbitant price, “said Nduwimana.

Today, a US dollar costs BIF 1735 at the official rate while it costs BIF 2900 on the black market.

For Ambassador Gasunzu, BRB should take necessary measures to facilitate exporters who need to import raw materials because they are the ones who bring in foreign currencies.

An adviser to the central bank said BRB prioritizes importers of drugs, chemical fertilizers and fuel over others when it comes to giving foreign currency.

Gasunzi finds, however, that BRB should give the entrepreneur the capital he has used and allocate the benefit to other useful purposes.

Mugere River to Be Protected From Butchers’ Activities

By Lorraine Josiane Manishatse

The Director of Water Resources says the clandestine abattoir set up along the Mugere River is one of the sources of Lake Tanganyika pollution. The Mugere surrounding inhabitants demand its relocation as it emits unpleasant odor.

When at Mugere River, at 12 Km from Bujumbura city center at 10 a.m., one smells unpleasant odor emanating from a local slaughterhouse located just on the river’s shores, in Kanyosha zone of Muha commune. Flies buzz around the place covered with fresh blood. A flock of crows were gathered together pecking at the remaining waste.

At less than 5 m from the Mugere River banks, one observes traces of fresh blood, cow’s horns and dozens of goat skins. The place has been transformed into an abattoir. There is a house built at 20 m from the river shores, it serves to keep the butchers ‘equipment such as bags, basins, knives and cans. At 5 m from this house, there are three large holes filled with cow dung.

At this time, butchers have already gone to sell meat at various markets in Kanyosha area. “They get up very early in the morning to slaughter goats and cows,” a young woman met at Mugere River Bridge who preferred to remain anonymous told Iwacu.

Residents demand the relocation of the abattoir because of its “nauseating smell”

A slaughterhouse must meet the minimum environmental standards, says a young woman living at 100 m from the Mugere. “An abattoir must necessarily have a tap water. These butchers, who wash meat in the Mugere River, are polluting it, “she said adding that the stench from this abattoir disturbs the surrounding population.” We smell a nauseating odor every morning and evening.

Pierre Sinzotuma, a Kanyosha resident, requests the administrative authorities to relocate the abattoir. “It stinks a lot,” he said before adding that the harmful waste from this slaughterhouse flows into the river. “They pollute the water of the river that we use daily,” he said.

Vital Ndikumana, one of the butchers of Mugere abattoir says they slaughter between 7 and 15 cows and between 10 and 20 goats per day. He admits that their work disturbs and threatens the surrounding inhabitants since it emits a very bad smell. “We work in very difficult conditions. We do not have water and the place is not suitable for a slaughterhouse, “says Ndikumana. He asks the administration to find another place to build a slaughterhouse that meets the minimum hygiene standards. He said that butchers pay BIF 2000 and BIF 1500 for a goat and cow slaughtered each day respectively.

Mugere abattoir, one of the sources of Lake Tanganyika pollution

Emmanuel Ndorimana, the Director General of Water Resources, says the clandestine abattoir along the Mugere River must be relocated. “Blood and other wastes from this abattoir go straight to the Mugere River which flows down into Lake Tanganyika, thus polluting the lake, “Ndorimana says.

He also says a fine of BIF 1,200 000 has been imposed on people who manage the slaughterhouse. He regrets that, they continue to work despite the fine. He also says these last three months, he addressed three correspondences to the administrator of Muha commune requesting him to suspend slaughtering activities along the banks of the Mugere River.

The latter only gave the slaughterhouse officials a formal notice of relocating the abattoir.”We plan to carry out strenuous activities in collaboration with the local authorities to permanently prevent these butchers from working in this place,” said Ndorimana.

In May 2017, the Ministry of Environment, together with the local authorities, destroyed a pigsty near the Kanyosha River. “No activity is allowed to be carried out in this zone,” said Ndorimana. As part of the protection of Lake Tanganyika, all rivers flowing across Bujumbura must be protected from all activities that can pollute them.

Lake Tanganyika is shared among four countries: the DRC, Tanzania, Burundi, and Zambia. It is the second oldest freshwater lake in the world, second largest by volume, and the second deepest, in all cases after Lake Baikal in Siberia.

Malaria Cases Significantly Decreased, Health Ministry Says

By Lorraine Josiane Manishatse

The spokesman for the Ministry of Health announced on 6 September that malaria cases have significantly decreased thanks to government’s efforts to combat this malaria epidemic. The population complain that they did not have mosquito nets as planned in the response plan.

On 13 March, the Minister of Health officially declared that Burundi was facing an epidemic of malaria. The spokesman for this ministry, Thaddée Ndikumana told journalists on 6 September that the cases of malaria have significantly decreased.

“Since the ministry declared malaria as an epidemic, it has detected more than 252,000 cases of malaria per week. However, it currently records more than 97,000 cases of malaria per week,” said Ndikumana.

The Government of Burundi has taken strict measures to deal with this scourge of malaria namely its detection and treatment, he said.

To achieve this, the Ministry of health spokesperson said the government had recruited additional doctors and nurses to support health district staff. “The ministry distributes freely artesunate-amodiaquine medicines to treat malaria patients … ” said Ndikumana.

Some people wonder how the government claims it is fighting malaria, whereas it has not distributed mosquito nets to the population as planned in the response plan. For them, “prevention is better than cure.”

“We have been waiting to be given insecticide-treated nets since July. The Ministry of Health officials came to register people living in different houses. They told us they would distribute mosquito nets in July. We waited but to no avail, “said a resident of Buterere, one of the poorest neighborhoods of Bujumbura.

He said he cannot afford to buy mosquito nets for his large family. “A mosquito net costs at least BIF 4000, I am no able to buy them. My family is in danger, “he said.

Ndikumana said the government’s efforts will be complemented by the next distribution of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets.

“More than 6 million mosquito nets will be given out. They are stored in provincial offices of health care, “he said.”We started the distribution at the communal level. Health centers and schools will follow,”Ndikumana said.

He also said the Ministry will shortly announce the date for the official launch of insecticide-treated nets distribution.

One of Regideso Offices Caught Fire

By Generaladminenews

Fire broke out in the office of the company in charge of supplying water and electricity-REGIDESO in Bujumbura city in the morning of this August 23rd 2017. The acting director of the company gives a temporary report of damages and says a commission has been set up to investigate into the cause of the fire.

At around 7:30 a.m., the fire broke out in an office where the data collected from the field are treated. “The civil protection police intervened but several things were already damaged: 18 computers and their accessories, our survey data as well as other materials used in the office such as a printer, tables, and an air-conditioner. We left the office safe yesterday. A commission to identify the cause of the fire and give the final report of the damages has been set up”, says Désiré Nsengiyumva, Regideso acting manager.

He says the office was ravaged and demands their customers to go to other shops in different quarters for urgent services. “For those who need to buy electricity, they can go to shops located in Kamenge and Kanyosha neighbourhoods. Our partner “Payway” will also help. For those who want to pay water bills, we ask them to be patient.We are trying to get things repaired quickly; probably we will resume activities tomorrow”.

Desiré Nsengiyumva sympathises with the family of one of REGIDESO employees who died in a car accident while driving fast to the office. “She was the chief of the service which caught fire. As a chief she wanted to come quickly to save some things but she unfortunately died in the car crash. We are saddened by her death”, he says.

Burundi

Price of Technical Inspection of Vehicles to Be Increased

Public Transport Office [OTRACO] has announced that the price of the technical inspection of vehicles will increase from… Read more »

Grenades Kill One, Injure 29 in Two Burundi Bars

By Moses Havyarimana

One person was killed and 29 others injured in twin grenade attacks in a Bujumbura neighbourhood, police said on Friday.

Burundi police spokesman Pierre Nkurikiye said the grenades exploded in two local bars in Buyenzi on Thursday night.

“I was drinking at local bar at around 7pm when I heard a blast and everyone scattered I didn’t know what had happened until I saw my elbow bleeding,” said 27-year-old Leandre, one of the victims.

“Only one person died on spot but the number could rise,” Mr Nkurikiye said, adding that the “criminals were among the customers.”

He said three suspects had been arrested.

The attacks came barely a fortnight after two people were killed in a similar attack in the same neighbourhood.

The government said the attacks were not politically motivated.

Sporadic attacks

Burundi has seen a rise in grenade attacks across the country following the political crisis that erupted two years ago after President Pierre Nkurunziza launched bid for a controversial third term, which he went on to win.

Last month eight people were killed in a grenade attack at a local bar in northern Kayanza province.

Meanwhile, the police said it is conducting investigations into the killing of two unidentified persons whose bodies were discovered in Gitega and Mwaro respectively, two provinces east of Bujumbura.

Burundi’s unrest has claimed between 500 and 2,000 lives and more than 400,000 Burundians have been forced into exile, rights groups and the UN say.

Burundi

No Improvement of Situation, Says Chairman of Commission of Inquiry On Burundi

The Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights on Burundi will present the final report of its investigation in Geneva… Read more »

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