Posts tagged as: building

Govt to Sell Exiled Tycoon’s Property

The Rwandan Revenue Authority has placed Kigali’s Union Trade Centre — a $20 million mall owned by exiled tycoon Tribert Rujugiro Ayabatwa — among properties to be auctioned for defaulting on their taxes.

Mr Rujugiro has taken the Rwandan government to the East African Court of Justice for the alleged illegal seizure of his properties.

RRA has published a list of properties up for auction and among them is the mall, which in 2013 was put under the Nyarugenge District Commission of Abandoned Properties.

The government said the property and many others had been put under the management of the Commission of Abandoned Properties for “efficient management,” which among other things includes paying taxes and utility bills.

UTC was put on a list of 14 properties that RRA said “are immovable assets of taxpayers whose properties have been attached and will be auctioned.”

The taxes owed are from 2015, when the building was already in the hands of the Commission of Abandoned Properties.

By press time, The EastAfrican had failed to ascertain how much UTC owes the government.

The EACJ is yet to decide the ongoing case in Arusha in which Mr Rujugiro, who fell out with the government in 2010, seeks to redeem a number of his properties that have been seized.

The case filed in 2013 was dismissed by the First Instance Chamber of the EACJ, but later the Appeal Court ordered the Trial Court to hear it afresh “citing that parties had not been afforded an opportunity to present relevant evidence in support of their respective cases.”

The case is still pending before the trial court and no hearing date has so far been announced.

Rwanda

Govt Expects Over 12000 Returnees By July 2018

At least12,000 Rwandans who still live in foreign countries as refugees could return home between July and June next… Read more »

South Africa: Molefe Resigned As Eskom CEO to Get Cabinet Position – Western Cape SACP

Western Cape SACP secretary Benson Ngqentsu believes Brian Molefe returned as Eskom CEO after he failed to secure a ministerial position in government.

Ngqentsu was speaking to SACP supporters in front of the Cape Town International Convention Centre (CTICC) where the African Utilities Week conference was taking place.

Molefe was expected to open the conference, but unexpectedly cancelled his attendance.

“Brian Molefe wasn’t honest when he resigned as Eskom CEO, he left because he thought he was getting a Cabinet position,” Ngqentsu said on Tuesday morning.

Molefe was reinstated as Eskom CEO on Monday after a three-month term in the National Assembly.

He resigned as Eskom CEO in November following a report by then-public protector Thuli Madonsela which implicated him in a coal deal with the controversial Gupta family.

Molefe was widely speculated to be Pravin Gordhan’s replacement as finance minister, but Ngqentsu said successful lobbying by the SACP ensured Molefe did not receive the position.

“Look what we’ve done, we must continue fighting against that corruption,” Ngqentsu said.

Roughly 50 SACP supporters assembled in front of the building to protest Molefe’s reappointment, under the watchful eye of police officials.

Posters calling for an inquiry into PetroSA, Transnet and Eskom were held up by supporters.

“We were expecting Brian, but he’s run home crying,” one poster read.

Ngqentsu earlier told News24 that Eskom chairperson Ben Ngubane is the “main culprit” responsible for “looting” at the parastatal.

“He is the one that wants to build another Hlaudi [Motsoeneng] at Eskom,” Ngqentsu said.

Private security guards were stationed in front of every entrance of the building, while delegates smoked outside and stared at the protesting SACP supporters.

The supporters complied with a police request to move away from the building and into the street as police said the CTICC was “private property”.

CTICC spokesperson Susan Davis said they were talking to event organisers to ensure the safety of delegates.

Ngqentsu earlier said the relevant authorities were not available on Monday to gain the necessary permission for the protest.

Source: News24

Tanzania: Indiscriminate High Rise Buildings Worry Legislator

Dodoma — Construction of high rise buildings in any city is supposed to adhere to rules and regulations given by engineering boards which are found in the building contract.

This was said in parliament by the Deputy Minister of Lands, Housing and Human Settlement Development, Angelina Mabula when she was responding to a question from Special Seats Member of Parliament, Mariam Kisangi (CCM).

She wanted to know why the government is issuing building permits for high rise buildings along major roads, which risk demolition to pave way for road expansion.

In her response, the deputy minister said that construction of high rise buildings along major roads is currently rampant, saying that this is mostly caused by improvement of road infrastructure in most cities.

She said that improvement of road infrastructure usually attracts a big number of investors who construct business structures, petrol stations, hotels and residential apartments.

“This is a normal thing in any developing country because good roads increase the value of any area, which in turn attracts investors,” said the deputy minister.

She said that to ensure they are not faced with a possibility of paying compensation to those who have constructed high rise buildings along major roads; the government has put several measures in place.

One of the measures she said includes identifying areas ripe for redevelopment to harmonize current and future land use and to divide the areas according to value of the land.

She said some of the areas already identified include Kariakoo, Kurasini, Temeke, Msasani, Oysterbay, Magomeni and Ilala. In other areas, she said planning of these areas is considered through master plans of the concerned towns.

Tanzania

Country Mourns 32 Pupils Who Died in a Bus Crash

The coldness of Arusha, with which the residents of this city have been long accustomed at this time of year, was… Read more »

Indiscriminate High Rise Buildings Worry Legislator

Dodoma — Construction of high rise buildings in any city is supposed to adhere to rules and regulations given by engineering boards which are found in the building contract.

This was said in parliament by the Deputy Minister of Lands, Housing and Human Settlement Development, Angelina Mabula when she was responding to a question from Special Seats Member of Parliament, Mariam Kisangi (CCM).

She wanted to know why the government is issuing building permits for high rise buildings along major roads, which risk demolition to pave way for road expansion.

In her response, the deputy minister said that construction of high rise buildings along major roads is currently rampant, saying that this is mostly caused by improvement of road infrastructure in most cities.

She said that improvement of road infrastructure usually attracts a big number of investors who construct business structures, petrol stations, hotels and residential apartments.

“This is a normal thing in any developing country because good roads increase the value of any area, which in turn attracts investors,” said the deputy minister.

She said that to ensure they are not faced with a possibility of paying compensation to those who have constructed high rise buildings along major roads; the government has put several measures in place.

One of the measures she said includes identifying areas ripe for redevelopment to harmonize current and future land use and to divide the areas according to value of the land.

She said some of the areas already identified include Kariakoo, Kurasini, Temeke, Msasani, Oysterbay, Magomeni and Ilala. In other areas, she said planning of these areas is considered through master plans of the concerned towns.

Tanzania

Country Mourns 32 Pupils Who Died in a Bus Crash

The coldness of Arusha, with which the residents of this city have been long accustomed at this time of year, was… Read more »

Uhuru Calls for UN-Habitat Reforms to Address Urbanisation

By Pscu

President Uhuru Kenyatta has underscored the need to reform the UN-Habitat to create smart towns and cities that are economically viable, socially livable, environmentally resilient and politically stable settlements.

The President said the capacity of the UN-Habitat should be strengthened to enable it to serve as a focal agency for sustainable urbanisation.

“That is why we must empower UN-Habitat with the resources it needs, and these resources must be adequate and predictable,” President Kenyatta said.

President Kenyatta was speaking Monday at the United Nations Complex in Gigiri, Nairobi, where he opened the 26th Session of the Governing Council of the UN-Habitat.

He also welcomed the recent appointment of a high-level panel of experts to conduct an evidence-based and independent assessment of the UN agency saying the initiative is timely.

“I believe that the organisation and structure of the agency requires reform to make it more effective, efficient, accountable and transparent in its decisions, and their making,” he said.

The President termed the session a milestone for UN-Habitat, being the first meeting of the Governing Council after the adoption of the momentous 2030 Agenda for sustainable development and the New Urban Agenda that sets the global strategy around urbanisation for the next two decades.

The 2030 Agenda is a comprehensive, integrated and inclusive outcome document that aims to achieve peace, prosperity, dignity and opportunity for all on a healthy planet.

“Our immediate responsibility is its implementation. We must quickly seize the opportunities, address the challenges and implement the Agenda.

“The first step – one we can take here and now – is to send a strong political message in support of the new Agenda,” President Kenyatta said.

President Kenyatta said Kenya has embraced devolution which will handle much of the implementation of the New Urban Agenda.

“According to our National Bureau of Statistics, by 2050 about half of our people will live in cities. Indeed, in 2030, the city of Nairobi will have about 6 million people,” he said.

He said Kenya’s devolved units have great potential for economic growth and employment creation.

The President also rooted for new and sustainable technologies to improve human settlements, especially through industrial building systems.

He said Kenya has taken up Industrial Building Systems in the construction of housing.

“I am pleased to report that our National Housing Corporation has set up a factory for such sustainable building systems. And we are promoting the development of environmentally friendly buildings and green energy,” the President said.

President Kenyatta took the opportunity to extend a special welcome to Peter Thompson, the President of the 71st session of the General Assembly of the United Nations, who he later held bilateral talks with on the margins of the UN-Habitat Governing Council meeting at Gigiri.

He commended Mr Thompson for his unwavering commitment to the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Other speakers included UN-Habitat Executive Director Joan Clos, UNEP Executive Director Erik Solheim and the Director-General of the United Nations Office in Nairobi (UNON), Ms Sahle Work Zewde.

Police Recover Dozens of Stolen Items in Kigali

Joint efforts against theft in the City of Kigali helped Police to recover dozens of stolen items over the last eight months, the majority of them electronics, Police records show.

The recovered items include laptops and desktop computers, television sets, smart-phones, home theatres and speakers, and iPads, among others.

Also recovered are projectors, printers and eight motorcycles.

Majority of the victims of theft received their recovered items, said Theos Badege, the Police spokesperson.

Among them are two internet cafes at Gisementi in Remera where thieves stole at least 46 computers that were all recovered, suspects arrested and convicted.

“Although cases of theft were generally not alarming, the overall approach is to have no crime or limit them to the lowest level possible,” Badege said.

“When cases of theft became rampant, Police approached it with differently or with an improved approach, by establishing a crackdown unit, mapping out prone areas, dismantling black markets that were buying stolen items, but also further building stronger partnership with the public that facilitated information sharing on suspected thieves and illegal stores,” he added.

This set up, according to Police records, has lessened theft to an average of two cases per day compared to at least five cases previously.

The success in deterrence, recovery and arrests, Badege said, are largely due to timely reporting, which facilitates timely response, strengthened Police operations and community night patrols, and increased sensitisation, among others.

“In some cases, victims report after a day or two or even after a week while others don’t even report. In other challenging situations, claimants have no proof of ownership, be it a receipt or even a mark to prove ownership. That’s why we still have some of the recovered items.”

He advised people to buy from recognised shops, keep receipts and always report immediately when they lose anything or are robbed.

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General, Johnston Busingye, while presiding over the pass-out of graduands of the Police Basic Course, last week, said the Government is reviewing and repealing criminal laws to provide higher penalties to culprits and repeat offenders.

President Kagame Hails Global Fund Partnership Model

Photo: Village Urugwiro/The New Times

President Kagame, the Minister for Health, Dr Diane Gashumba (second-left), and the State Minister for Economic Planning, Dr Uzziel Ndagijimana (right), in a group photo with members of the Global Fund board, who are in the country for the 37th meeting of the Fund.

By Collins Mwai

President Paul Kagame hailed the Global Fund for adopting a partnership model based on cooperation, accountability and approaches that are flexible, innovative in addressing global challenges.

The President made the remarks during the official opening of the 37th Global Fund Board meeting in Kigali yesterday.

The Global Fund is an international financing organisation that aims to attract and disburse additional resources to prevent and treat HIV and AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.

Kagame said there are multiple lessons to borrow from the Global Fund’s model and success over the years, which has been possibly one of the most consequential and effective development partnership in Rwanda’s history.

Among the models used by the organisation that can be emulated, Kagame said, is innovation and developing new ways of doing business as well as flexibility to do the right things well.

“There are important lessons that we can draw from this success, the fund was itself an innovation and a fundamentally new way of doing business. Building on that, there is the spirit to do the right thing and flexibility to do the right things well. Let’s not take this for granted,” he said.

“After all, it is quite easy to waste billions of dollars by continuing to spend money year in and year out whether there are any results to show for it or not.”

Kagame said, by emulating such approaches, it will be possible to reduce instances of wasteful expenditure by development programmes.

“We see examples all over whether in development programmes or peace and security efforts in our region and beyond, we can see a lot of money flowing, a lot of activities but you can hardly match the results. If the philosophy behind the Global Fund’s achievements is applied to other global problems, our world would be a better place,” the President said.

He said it was not an accident that Rwanda’s biggest health-related gains were at a time when the Fund was scaling up its operations, noting that partnership with the Fund had greatly facilitated the development of Rwanda’s health sector.

Before and during the partnership of the two parties, Kagame said, Global Fund took time to understand the health system that Rwanda was setting up and went on to support it.

The milestones and achievements of the two partners include increasing the number of HIV-positive persons on antiretroviral treatment, getting on track to eliminate mother-to-child transmission and significant reduction of malaria and tuberculosis-related deaths.

“Together, these factors have added almost 20 years to the life expectancy of the average Rwandan,” Kagame said.

Kagame said, going forward, the world can only deal with challenges in the health sector by strengthening systems as opposed to circumventing them.

The board members have visited many projects that they support in the country.

Norbert Hauser, the chair of the board, said they had decided to hold their meeting in Kigali to get a direct impression of their work in the country and learn lessons on the achievements so far.

He said, so far, partnership with Rwanda had been successful and there were lessons to be emulated from Rwanda by countries across the continent and beyond.

Among the areas where Rwanda was doing well, Hauser said, was government-led investments in the health sector and efforts to rely less on donors.

Health minister Diane Gashumba said the partnership has mainly focused on HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria but the support has also gone into achievement of health-related Millennium Development Goals.

The partnership between Rwanda and the Global Fund dates back to 2003.

Rwanda: President Kagame Hails Global Fund Partnership Model

Photo: Village Urugwiro/The New Times

President Kagame, the Minister for Health, Dr Diane Gashumba (second-left), and the State Minister for Economic Planning, Dr Uzziel Ndagijimana (right), in a group photo with members of the Global Fund board, who are in the country for the 37th meeting of the Fund.

By Collins Mwai

President Paul Kagame hailed the Global Fund for adopting a partnership model based on cooperation, accountability and approaches that are flexible, innovative in addressing global challenges.

The President made the remarks during the official opening of the 37th Global Fund Board meeting in Kigali yesterday.

The Global Fund is an international financing organisation that aims to attract and disburse additional resources to prevent and treat HIV and AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.

Kagame said there are multiple lessons to borrow from the Global Fund’s model and success over the years, which has been possibly one of the most consequential and effective development partnership in Rwanda’s history.

Among the models used by the organisation that can be emulated, Kagame said, is innovation and developing new ways of doing business as well as flexibility to do the right things well.

“There are important lessons that we can draw from this success, the fund was itself an innovation and a fundamentally new way of doing business. Building on that, there is the spirit to do the right thing and flexibility to do the right things well. Let’s not take this for granted,” he said.

“After all, it is quite easy to waste billions of dollars by continuing to spend money year in and year out whether there are any results to show for it or not.”

Kagame said, by emulating such approaches, it will be possible to reduce instances of wasteful expenditure by development programmes.

“We see examples all over whether in development programmes or peace and security efforts in our region and beyond, we can see a lot of money flowing, a lot of activities but you can hardly match the results. If the philosophy behind the Global Fund’s achievements is applied to other global problems, our world would be a better place,” the President said.

He said it was not an accident that Rwanda’s biggest health-related gains were at a time when the Fund was scaling up its operations, noting that partnership with the Fund had greatly facilitated the development of Rwanda’s health sector.

Before and during the partnership of the two parties, Kagame said, Global Fund took time to understand the health system that Rwanda was setting up and went on to support it.

The milestones and achievements of the two partners include increasing the number of HIV-positive persons on antiretroviral treatment, getting on track to eliminate mother-to-child transmission and significant reduction of malaria and tuberculosis-related deaths.

“Together, these factors have added almost 20 years to the life expectancy of the average Rwandan,” Kagame said.

Kagame said, going forward, the world can only deal with challenges in the health sector by strengthening systems as opposed to circumventing them.

The board members have visited many projects that they support in the country.

Norbert Hauser, the chair of the board, said they had decided to hold their meeting in Kigali to get a direct impression of their work in the country and learn lessons on the achievements so far.

He said, so far, partnership with Rwanda had been successful and there were lessons to be emulated from Rwanda by countries across the continent and beyond.

Among the areas where Rwanda was doing well, Hauser said, was government-led investments in the health sector and efforts to rely less on donors.

Health minister Diane Gashumba said the partnership has mainly focused on HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria but the support has also gone into achievement of health-related Millennium Development Goals.

The partnership between Rwanda and the Global Fund dates back to 2003.

Uganda: ‘Flame and Song – ‘ a Family’s Struggle Building a Nation

opinionBy Gaaki Kigambo

Educated East Africans of a certain age will recall a time when the poem Building the Nation by Ugandan poet Henry Muwanga Barlow was essential reading in school, in the same league as writing by the leading lights in African literature.

This six-stanza poem exposed the false hopes of the Uganda Independence project. The elite who succeeded the colonisers took after their predecessors’ opulent lifestyle as well, abandoning the egalitarian promises of nation building.

Now Barlow’s last born daughter Philippa Namutebi Kabali-Kagwa has written The VIP Room, a poem about the death of her father — a ranking civil servant until his retirement in 1987 — at the Mulago National Referral Hospital.

The poem offers a depressing examination of the decay of Mulago and by extension the entire nation’s healthcare system or its very essence if you will. If Building the Nation is a fitting assessment of the premature birth Uganda suffered at Independence, The VIP room aptly represents the fits and starts that have characterised its story since then.

The deeply emotive poem features in Philippa’s republished personal memoir, Flame and Song, a 188-page book in which she reminisces about growing up in a Ugandan middle class family in the ever shifting sands of the country’s existence as an independent state.

The book was released in April 4, 2017 by Sooo Many Stories, an equally new Ugandan publisher whose raison d’être is to shine a light on as many stories as Philippa’s as there exists.

The publisher secured East African rights to the book, which was initially published last year in South Africa where the author has lived for the past 23 years.

BackgroundThe account of how Barlow’s life slowly ebbed away, in a VIP section of Mulago hospital, tells of the surgeon who was supposed to fix Barlow’s broken hip but instead chose to attend a conference; the lab that was supposed to quickly run vital tests but lay derelict; the head nurse who was supposed to supply sterilised bedding but preferred not to, to prevent them from getting soiled, and her juniors who were supposed to monitor Barlow all night but took time away supposedly to attend to other patients.

These incidents are all too familiar to many a Ugandan across the country’s excuses of healthcare facilities or, for that matter, the public service system in general.

At the time Philippa was born in 1964, Mulago ranked among the best hospitals in Africa. So high were its standards that when then president Milton Obote was shot in the neck in 1969 in an attempted assassination, he did not require to be flown out of the country for treatment.

Doctors at Mulago successfully stabilised and treated him.

Yet in a twist of bitter irony, President Yoweri Museveni, who waged a rebellion against Obote enroute to capturing power in 1986, has not only publicly expressed distrust in Uganda’s medical workers, but has also starved them and the health sector generally of adequate funding. He at one time had his pregnant daughter flown on the presidential jet to Germany to have the baby.

It is little wonder to many Ugandans therefore that that the Nairobi Hospital and the Kenyatta National and Referral Hospital in neighbouring Kenya have become Uganda’s main referral hospitals for its important citizens. The very important persons fly to South Africa, India, Europe and the United States for treatment.

So much for the promise of a fundamental change in the governance of the country.

Family storyIn Flame and Song, Philippa demonstrates her mastery of language, lending the book gravitas.

This skill makes it possible for her to be economical with details about sensitive bits of her family’s story such as three of her siblings’ lifelong mental challenges without affecting the narrative.

Like many other Ugandans, Philippa, the last born in a family of five, moved to South Africa to get away from the political terror and uncertainty that has held Uganda hostage. Once there, she was persuaded to settle down because of essential life comforts like a reliable healthcare and education system that her homeland is still struggling to provide — a stinging commentary on what has befallen the hopes of a country she was born in, coming into the world as she did just two years after Independence.

Philippa was hardly out of her diapers in 1966 when Uganda plunged into its first major national crisis. Milton Obote, the executive prime minister at the time, attacked the palace of Sir Edward Muteesa II, the king of Buganda and ceremonial president of Uganda, forcing the king to escape into exile. Obote effectively introduced the gun as the only reliable arbiter of political disputes in post-Independence Uganda, which thrives to date.

For Philippa and her generation, political violence and the recourse to arms to resolve it formed the foundation of their young lives. It introduced silences that crushed or at least grazed blossoming familial and even communal relations, distorted a sense of belonging, and shaped futures in unexpected ways.

For her as well as the majority of her peers, the effect of all this either remains closed off, a chapter unworthy of reopening, or has only begun being explored – which she encourages a lot more people to do.

“We need to understand why things are the way they are in our families, our country. We’re building on a lot of silence and that’s not a good thing,” Philippa said at the book launch on April 4 at the Ibamba Restaurant at the Uganda Museum in Kampala.

Flame and Song is written as a way for Philippa to grieve for her parents since she wrote in the wake of their deaths. Her father died in 2006 and the mother six years later in 2012. Yet it appears to work better as a dirge for her country.

Initially, Philippa had wanted to write about her mother – the family’s cornerstone – who survived everything that came her way while holding together a very delicate family, with a firstborn child suffering from depression while two others had cerebral palsy. While bits and pieces of her mother appear here and there, Flame and Song also appears more as a part memoir of her quiet father, eulogised as a consummate civil servant who wrote poetry for over 45 years in an effort to understand himself and his environment.

The book is only 188 pages long but the story is powerful enough to stay with you for a long time.

………………………………………….

Building The Nation

Today I did my shareIn building the nation.I drove a Permanent SecretaryTo an important urgent functionIn fact to a lunch at the Vic.

The menu reflected its importanceCold bell beer with small talk,Then fried chicken with nicetiesWine to fill the hollowness of the laughsIce-cream to cover the stereotype jokesCoffee to keep the PS awake on return journey.

I drove the Permanent Secretary back.He yawned many times in back of the ca rThen to keep awake, he suddenly asked,Did you have any lunch friend?I replied looking straight aheadAnd secretly smiling at his belated concernThat I had not, but was slimming!

Upon which he said with seriousnessThat amused more than annoyed me,Mwanainchi, I too had none!I attended to matters of state.Highly delicate diplomatic duties you know, And friend, it goes against my grain, Causes me stomach ulcers and wind.Ah, he continued, yawning again, The pains we suffer in building the nation!

So the PS had ulcers too!My ulcers I think are equally painfulOnly they are caused by hunger, Not sumptuous lunches!

So two nation buildersArrived home this eveningWith terrible stomach painsThe result of building the nation — Different ways.

………………..

The VIP room

‘The builder of the nation is dead. But he was old,’ they said. Waiting three days for the physician to say ‘His heart is okay, you can fix his hip’ and then have the surgeon disappear to a conference, they say.

‘The builder of the nation is dead. But he was old,’ they said. In the VIP room, on the 6th floor, of our national flagship hospital we loved him and prayed for him. It was all we could do, impotent against a system that made us grateful for crumbs.

Uganda’s Inflation Continues to Rise

By Martin Luther Oketch

Kampala — Uganda’s inflation has continued to trend upward for a second consecutive month, fuelled by rising food crop prices, that have seen annual headline inflation for the year ending April 2017 rising to 6.8 per cent compared to 6.4 per cent for the year ended March 2017.

According to Uganda Bureau of Statistics (Ubos), the increase was due to the annual food crops inflation which rose to 21.6 per cent for the year ending April 2017 compared to 20.9 per cent recorded for the year ended March 2017.

The shift was blamed on prolonged drought the country experienced, which resulted into poor crop harvest.

Ubos director macroeconomic statistics Chris N Mukiza, while releasing the Consumer Price Index in Kampala last week, said: “The rise in annual food crops inflation was mainly due to the vegetables inflation that increased t0 14.0 per cent for the year ending April 2017 compared to the 11.9 per cent registered during the year ended March 2017.”

Dr Mukiza said fruits inflation registered a 35.5 per cent for the year ending April 2017, the same rate recorded for the year ended March 2017.

Similarly, annual core inflation rose to 4.9 per cent for the year ending April 2017 compared to 4.7 per cent recorded for the previous year.

The managing director of Alpha Capital, Mr Stephen Kaboyo, told Daily Monitor: “There is a general underlying trend of building cost pressures that are feeding through from the harsh weather conditions in the early part of the year. In my view, this supply shock is the main factor behind the upward trend in inflation.”

“On the positive side the Shilling stability seen in last couple of months seem to be moderating the effects; however depreciation pressures are lately showing up again considering the currency movements of this week,” he added.

Globally, the World Bank is forecasting higher prices for industrial commodities, principally energy and metals, in 2017 and next year.

Uganda

Uganda’s Museveni and Egypt to Discuss ‘Water Politics’ on River Nile

Egyptian foreign minister, Sameh Shoukry is to meet Ugandan President, Yoweri Museveni to discuss management of the… Read more »

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