Posts tagged as: association

Only 59% of Dar Waste Is Taken to Dump – City Report

By Janeth Mesomapya

About 700,000 tonnes of solid waste is produced in Dar es Salam annually, yet only 59 per cent of the waste is transported to Pugu Waste Dump.

This was said in the city yesterday during a solid waste management conference, which brought together stakeholders from private organisations led by the International Solid Waste Association and Climate and Clean Air Coalition.

The conference basically focused on how Pugu Waste Dump site could be improved by investing in recycling technology and in effective and sustainable waste collection.

According to Dar es Salaam City Council Director Sipora Liana, increased waste production is still a persisting problem, so there is a need to invest in modern technology to manage industrial and domestic wastes.

She explained that currently the council was finalising agreements with 10 factories for recycling plastic and iron waste, while another factory would soon start recycling glass waste.

“We also have another project of Sh80 million to start an industry for recycling paper waste – that is turning it into charcoal,” she added.

Ms Liana explained that her office had a budget of Sh1 billion for buying land in Kigamboni, which would be used as another waste dump and increase waste management in the city.

For his part, the First Secretary of the Economic and Trade Policy of the Embassy of The Netherlands Eugene Gies said his office in partnership with other stakeholders would conduct thorough research on Pugu Waster Dump to find out how the project would work.

“If the site is improved the city will definitely experience great strides in social and economic development starting with increased employment opportunities and public health. There is still a challenge in waste collection and management not only in Dar es Salaam, but also in other parts of the country.

Tanzania

Magufuli Fires 9,932 Civil Servants

President John Magufuli has instantly sacked 9,932 workers who have been found using fake certificates. Read more »

Rwemalika Named to Key International Olympic Committee Commission

By Geoffrey Asiimwe

Rwanda National Olympic and Sports Committee (CNOSR) first vice president, Felicite Rwemalika, has been appointed as an executive member on the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) Sport and Active Society Commission.

The 58-year-old was appointed to the position on Tuesday by IOC President Thomas Bach when he announced the IOC commissions for 2017.

The appointment comes after Rwemalika, also a member of the football federation’s executive committee, was recognised with the prestigious IOC Women and Sport Award for Africa in Lausanne, Switzerland for her effort in promoting women football in Rwanda for the past 17 years.

The Sport and Active Society Commission (formerly the Sport for All Commission) advises the IOC Session, the IOC Executive Board and the IOC President on all the activities of the Olympic Movement that are related to using sport to improve physical activity in the population, giving access to sport as a right for all, and on engaging in sports activities with a special focus on youth.

Other responsibilities of the commission are giving input on relevant activities related to the implementation of Olympic Agenda 2020, specifically related to promoting an active lifestyle in society, with a focus on the youth.

Rwemalika founded the Association of Kigali Women in Sports (AKWOS), and since 2001 she has travelled across the country promoting football as a tool to empower girls and the young generation.

Last month, she was overwhelmingly voted as the first vice president of RNOSC polling 43 out of 45 votes cast. She deputises Valens Munyabagisha.

Rwanda

Rwanda, Ethiopia Expand Bilateral Ties

Rwanda and Ethiopia agreed on new areas of cooperation at a meeting which concluded in Kigali on Tuesday, an official… Read more »

South Africa: Cabin Crew Association to Challenge Interdict Application

RESOURCE: South African Airways Granted Court Interdict to Stop Crew Members Strike

The SA Cabin Crew Association (Sacca) is challenging South African Airways’ (SAA) application to interdict its members from striking.

The SAA applied to the Johannesburg Labour Court to have its striking cabin crew staff return to work immediately.

SAA’s affidavit said that the strike was unprotected and it requested that an order be granted by the court to restrain employees from participating in the strike.

The application also requests that an order be made for Sacca to restrain from encouraging and promoting participation in the strike.

Sacca however asked the court for a delay to file its own court papers to challenge the SAA application.

The union was granted until 13:00 to file papers before the matter is heard.

Passengers booked to travel with SAA are being advised that the airline’s cabin crew are currently on strike and picketing outside the SAA offices at OR Tambo International Airport, Traveller24 reported.

The airline received a notification of intent to strike on Tuesday.

While negotiations are underway regarding meal allowances for cabin crew, the airline stated on Tuesday it was “doing everything possible to find common ground and/or a settlement on matters”. It is also putting procedures in place “to support any service disruptions”.

Source: News24

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South African Airways Ready for Service Disruptions

South African Airways (SAA) says preparations are underway to support service disruptions as the South African Cabin… Read more »

Safaricom Gives M-Pesa Users Free Mobile Money Transfers

Photo: The Nation

An M-Pesa user at a Jamia Mall outlet in Nairobi (file photo).

By Muthoki Mumo

Telecoms firm Safaricom on Tuesday said it had resolved a technical problem that caused Monday’s network outage, leaving millions of customers stranded.

Safaricom’s network went down on Monday morning debilitating commerce. For nearly two hours on Monday, subscribers were unable to make calls, send messages or transact on M-Pesa.

Although the telecom firm said it had repaired its network by Monday afternoon, services remained sporadic throughout Monday night and Tuesday morning and only returned to normality in the afternoon.

“We had two traffic outlets which failed rapidly one after the other. In response, as a priority, the team very quickly started running the affected functions from our redundant equipment to restore services,” said Safaricom chief executive Bob Collymore.

FREE MOBILE MONEY

Mr Collymore, whose time at the helm of Safaricom is expected to come to an end this year, gave M-Pesa users 24 hours of free mobile money transfers as a balm for the inconvenience and losses suffered over the two days.

Safaricom’s share at the Nairobi Securities Exchange lost ground marginally, closing at Sh18.95 on Tuesday from Sh19.10 the previous day, meaning that the telecom firm shed Sh6 billion of market capitalisation.

More on This

Kenya: Why Safaricom Crashed – VIDEO


Safaricom: Our Services Are Coming Up Progressively

The Communications Authority of Kenya (CA) said it would hold back on imposing sanctions on Safaricom until a detailed report on the incident is submitted.”The authority is awaiting a comprehensive report on the incident from Safaricom in order to determine whether there was any omission on their part in line with the obligations of their licence,” said the CASafaricom has 71.6 market share of Kenya’s mobile subscription and is the largest in the mobile money business that moves an average of Sh9 billion a day via M-Pesa.DOMINANT ROLEThe outage brought back fears raised by the National Treasury last year that M-Pesa may have such a dominant role in the economy as to pose a fiscal risk to Kenya.Entities as diverse as utility firms, hospitals and banks have hooked up their systems to M-Pesa.Kenya Power, for instance, relies on mobile money for 46 per cent of its billing but said the firm was not able to quantify the impact of the outage, even as it said the effect was “significant”.”This just shows that we need business continuity plans for the banks, quick alternative routes to mobile money,” said Kenya Bankers’ Association chief executive Habil Olaka.The outage on the Safaricom network also comes at a time when Kenyans are concerned about the privacy and integrity of telecommunication services in the context of the upcoming General Election.More on ThisSafaricom: Our Services Are Coming Up Progressively

The service provider in the latest update sent to newsrooms said it had identified the cause of the outage and was… Read more »

Kenya: Safaricom Gives M-Pesa Users Free Mobile Money Transfers

Photo: The Nation

An M-Pesa user at a Jamia Mall outlet in Nairobi (file photo).

By Muthoki Mumo

Telecoms firm Safaricom on Tuesday said it had resolved a technical problem that caused Monday’s network outage, leaving millions of customers stranded.

Safaricom’s network went down on Monday morning debilitating commerce. For nearly two hours on Monday, subscribers were unable to make calls, send messages or transact on M-Pesa.

Although the telecom firm said it had repaired its network by Monday afternoon, services remained sporadic throughout Monday night and Tuesday morning and only returned to normality in the afternoon.

“We had two traffic outlets which failed rapidly one after the other. In response, as a priority, the team very quickly started running the affected functions from our redundant equipment to restore services,” said Safaricom chief executive Bob Collymore.

FREE MOBILE MONEY

Mr Collymore, whose time at the helm of Safaricom is expected to come to an end this year, gave M-Pesa users 24 hours of free mobile money transfers as a balm for the inconvenience and losses suffered over the two days.

Safaricom’s share at the Nairobi Securities Exchange lost ground marginally, closing at Sh18.95 on Tuesday from Sh19.10 the previous day, meaning that the telecom firm shed Sh6 billion of market capitalisation.

More on This

Kenya: Why Safaricom Crashed – VIDEO


Safaricom: Our Services Are Coming Up Progressively

The Communications Authority of Kenya (CA) said it would hold back on imposing sanctions on Safaricom until a detailed report on the incident is submitted.”The authority is awaiting a comprehensive report on the incident from Safaricom in order to determine whether there was any omission on their part in line with the obligations of their licence,” said the CASafaricom has 71.6 market share of Kenya’s mobile subscription and is the largest in the mobile money business that moves an average of Sh9 billion a day via M-Pesa.DOMINANT ROLEThe outage brought back fears raised by the National Treasury last year that M-Pesa may have such a dominant role in the economy as to pose a fiscal risk to Kenya.Entities as diverse as utility firms, hospitals and banks have hooked up their systems to M-Pesa.Kenya Power, for instance, relies on mobile money for 46 per cent of its billing but said the firm was not able to quantify the impact of the outage, even as it said the effect was “significant”.”This just shows that we need business continuity plans for the banks, quick alternative routes to mobile money,” said Kenya Bankers’ Association chief executive Habil Olaka.The outage on the Safaricom network also comes at a time when Kenyans are concerned about the privacy and integrity of telecommunication services in the context of the upcoming General Election.More on ThisSafaricom: Our Services Are Coming Up Progressively

The service provider in the latest update sent to newsrooms said it had identified the cause of the outage and was… Read more »

Nigeria: Pharma Industry Targets 12% Growth Rate to Boost GDP

By Wole Oyebade

Local manufacturing arm of the pharmaceutical sector in Nigeria is targeting an annual growth rate of 12 to 15 per cent to improve its contributions to the economy.

The sub-sector, which currently accounts for less than one per cent of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP), is designing a Marshall Plan with timelines to achieve the objective.

And if the industry steadily grows by 12 per cent according to experts, the sub-sector would be producing over 70 per cent of pharmaceutical needs locally. At the moment, 30 per cent are produced in Nigeria and 70 per cent imported.

The industrialists and other stakeholders, who met at a two-day 20th national conference of the Association of Industrial Pharmacists of Nigeria (NAIP), in Lagos, were unanimous on the huge potential at the disposal of the sector and the feasibility of the target, if all hands are on deck.

The Chief Executive Officer, Business School Netherlands, Nigeria, Lere Baale, noted that the industry in India grows by 11.6 per cent, as such; the 12 per cent target is not beyond Nigeria.

Baale said at 12 per cent growth rate, the sub-sector would have at least doubled its contribution to the GDP in six years or in five years if the growth rate is 15 per cent.

The keynote speaker, on the theme: ‘Growing the Nigerian pharmaceutical industry for greater economic impact,’ said stakeholders must first realise the need for paradigm shift in the scheme of things.

He said the world is now in the digital age, where “what was taught in schools or we have learnt some five years ago are no longer relevant to the industries today.”

“First, we need to restructure our educational system in line with the current methods and need of the industry,” he said.

Baale reiterated the need for more entrepreneurs in the industry, the need for right policies and advocacy, research and development into new areas, and the imperative of strategic collaborations.

A former Chairman of the Nigerian Economic Summit Group, Sam Ohuabunwa, stressed the importance of industrialists increasing output, accessibility and improved outreach for new products to meet the needs of Nigerians.

Ohuabunwa also called on the government to support local manufacturers with investment in infrastructure, to enhance local drug production, and to give preferential procurement to local products to stimulate more investments from the private sector.

According to him, “The combination of these factors will raise productivity, which is the GDP, increase component of products made in Nigeria to enhance self-sufficiency and also reduce the risk of depending on the world to provide us such an essential thing as pharmaceutical product.”

Ohuabunwa, who chaired the opening session, said things were beginning to look up for manufacturers, with government’s policies in the area of tariffs, ease of doing business, and foreign exchange allocation, adding that the pharmaceutical sector will benefit.

Human Activities Threaten Water Source Sustainability

By Deus Ngowi

Hai — SANYA-KWARE water source in Ng’uni-Nroa Shofa village in Masama West Ward here is on the verge of drying up due to indiscriminate tree cutting and cattle grazing around it.

The source that pours its water in Ngarwarkoi River is one of the main sources of water to the Pangani Water Basin and is under a formally registered Sanya-Kware Water Users Association, Uwamasakwa.

A research conducted at the area shows that people have been growing crops like maize near the water source as well as around Ngarwarkoi River, leading to decreased water production and flow.

Lately, environment in Hai District and Kilimanjaro Region in general has been subjected to massive degradation, ruining the once evergreen region and home to Africa’s highest mountain and world’s highest free standing mountain.

Uwamasakwa Chairman Frank Kimaro blamed the degradation problem on, partly passive hamlet and village leaders as well as low awareness and poverty among the populations surrounding the areas.

He challenged the leaders to be proactive and seek alternative ways for their people to earn a living. He cautioned against water springs drying up, saying the effects will be hard to bear to everyone, not only in Hai District but also to other areas where water from the springs flows.

Nuri Hamlet Chairman Ndemaeli Massawe admitted the presence of pollution at his area of jurisdiction, saying some peasants prefer the area because of readily availability of enough water.

Mr Massawe said his office has embarked on efforts to deal with the problem through stopping the human activities and instead planting trees to ensure continuation of water flow from the springs to conserve the environment.

Ng’uni Village Executive Officer Hezron Nkya said the government is in a process of marking and putting beacons to protect the areas from encroachment and enforce the existing laws of the land. It is against the law to conduct agricultural and farming activities or cut trees on an area that is within 60 metres from the water source or river.

Water associations operate in different parts of Kilimanjaro Region, but some still at their nascent stages of implementation need technical and financial support.

An environmental activist, Dr John Francis said Tanzanians should consider themselves as part of the problem of growing water stress in the globe, but also as part of the solution, arguing that more initiatives are needed, with the best being the local community sense of ownership of water sources.

Tanzania

Chinese Footwear Firm Sets Solid Foothold Into Africa

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No More Cooking Gas Imports Via Tanzania in a Week, Says Minister

By Edwin Okoth

The Ministry of Energy has banned imports of cooking gas through the Kenya-Tanzania border, raising the possibility of a shortage and surge in the price of the commodity.

Petroleum Principal Secretary Andrew Kamau on Monday said traders will not be allowed to import gas imports via land borders in a week’s time.The move, according to Mr Kamau, is meant to eliminate illegal cooking gas filling plants which have cropped up in various parts of the country posing safety and security risks.

“The Cabinet Secretary has written a letter to Energy Regulatory Commissions, Customs and Kenya Bureau of Standards and designated Mombasa as the only point of import for LPG. So if you want to play in this game, come and invest in Kenya, import through Mombasa and then we can now follow up who is supplying unlicensed dealers. But now this whole thing about Tanzania is a thing of the past,” Mr Kamau told a briefing for the oil marketing companies organised by Kenya Pipeline Company.

Mr Kamau later confirmed that the full implementation will begin before the end of the month, which implies this week.

The OMCs had complained of being undercut by the illegal gas refillers who take their cylinders, fill them and return them into the market.

The ban is, however, likely to catch the dealers who rely on the gas from Tanzania unawares as most of them denied knowledge of the plan.Energy Dealers Association said it was yet to receive communication regarding the ban.

Tanzania

Tanzania Maintains Place As Second Largest Military Spender

Tanzania maintained its position as the second largest military spender in East Africa last year as the global… Read more »

Africa: Experts Urge African Nations to Increase Science Funding

Photo: Nadege Imbabazi/The New Times

A researcher examines genetically modified seeds at Rwanda National Genebank’s research centre in Huye.

By Emmanuel Ntirenganya

African countries should allocate more funds to agricultural science, research and technology for the continent to bridge crop production gap and ensure food security, agriculture experts have said.

The experts expressed concern that most African countries have not met the targets of the 2003 Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP)’s Maputo declaration, requiring African countries to allocate at least 10 per cent of their national budget to agriculture.

And, according to the Africa Science Agenda for Agriculture, approved by African Heads of State and Government in Malabo in 2014, each African country should use at least one per cent of its public expenditure on agricultural research and development.

But actors in agricultural research and development who were attending a regional consultative workshop on rolling-out the Science Agenda for Agriculture in Africa (S3A) for East and Central Africa Region, last week, said that only Tunisia and South Africa have been able to meet targets.

The three-day workshop in Kigali concluded Friday.

The Agenda calls for a deeper application of science in agriculture as a means to transform the sector.

Raymond Jatta, the Programme Coordinator for Science Agenda Mainstreaming at Forum for Agriculture Reform in Africa, said that science and research as well as technology in agriculture have faced funding constraints, yet agriculture is major source of income for the majority of Africans and a key contributor to the continent’s economy.

“If 70 per cent of your people rely on agriculture, you should be putting a significant portion of your resources in that area,” he said.

“I think that the whole thing that needs to change is the budget architecture. We need to get some more money to these sectors where more people are engaged and one of those areas is definitely agriculture,” he said.

He observed that the experience in the world shows that, if you apply science, you have good seeds, improved seed varieties, a good transport system, then technologies and farmers are able to access those technologies.

“If you are able to use good innovations and good farming practices, yields can grow from the baseline of two tonnes per hectare to about seven tonnes per hectare for lots of crops such as staples like rice, and cereals in general,” he said.

The current average rice production in Rwanda stands at 5.5 tonnes per hectare, while some farmers harvest about seven tonnes per hectare, according to information from the Rwanda Agriculture Board (RAB).

RAB’s head of research department, Patrick Karangwa, said that African governments need ownership and commitment to science, technology, innovation and research so that at least 1 per cent of the GDP is invested in the area.

“For us to have considerable impact and change, we should put in more efforts in extension systems and building the capacities of our farmers. The research we carry out should be more-targeted to solving issues facing farmers such as crop diseases,” he said, stressing the importance of giving incentives to researchers to ensure perfection in their research projects as well as work closely with farmers.

Biofortification and seed regulation

The Chairman of the Board of Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in Eastern and Central Africa (ASARECA), Ambrose Agona, called for governments’ commitments to a conducive environment for innovation, multiplication, commercialisation and dissemination of technologies.

Agona, who is also the Director General for Uganda’s National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO), said that when it comes to research, there is need for investments, and government commitment to finance research in a more predictable manner.

He said that sometimes there are quality seed varieties that are released by research institutions, but, because of inadequate and insufficient seed supply systems, there is an issue of fake seeds on the market as some deceitful dealers are selling ‘grains’ to famers instead of selling them ‘seeds’.

Agona added that the bio fortification technology in foods will help address hidden hunger among Africans, which is caused by micronutrient deficiency like lack of zinc, iron and vitamin A, which is very helpful to children below five and lactating mothers.

Participants drew from from Rwanda, Burundi, DR Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, South Sudan, Tanzania, Eritrea, Uganda and Madagascar.

The S3A’s vision aimed to ensure Africa is food secure by 2030, a global scientific player, and the world’s breadbasket.

US Roasters to Raise Coffee Imports 25%

Photo: Nation

A farmer picks her coffee crop: To benefit from high global prices of coffee, farmers have been advised to increase production.

By Gerald Andae

American roasters are expected to raise coffee purchases from Kenya by a quarter to Sh3.5 billion annually after the country showcased its produce in the ongoing symposium in Seattle, US.

Coffee Directorate made a pitch for Kenya’s specialty coffee during the exhibition to have the US, which pays a premium price for the commodity, increase its uptake 25 per cent.

America buys seven per cent of Kenya’s annual export of 46,000 metric tonnes but it pays highly compared to the other top buyers.

US buyers currently pay Sh500 a kilogramme compared to Germany that is the leading importer but pays Sh300 for the same quantity, according to the directorate.

“We have pushed for increased sale from the American roasters and they have already given an undertaking to increase the sales from what they currently buy,” said Agriculture Cabinet secretary Willy Bett.

During the financial year 2015/2016, American roasters paid Sh30,000 per 50 kilogramme bag compared with Sh25,000 that Germany offered and Sh24,000 that Belgium gave for the same quantity.

The Coffee Directorate is exhibiting Kenya’s specialty coffee at the annual global coffee meeting that brings together key stakeholders in the sector.

Kenya was chosen as a portrait country in this year’s exhibition in Seattle making it the focus of the activities at the coffee trade fair that started on April 19.

The Specialty Coffee Association of America Symposium and Exhibition, organised by the Specialty Coffee Association of America is one of the single largest market avenues where coffee producers meet buyers and consumers of specialty coffee.

But even as Kenya seeks to expand its market, productivity of coffee per bush has dropped from 10kg to two kilos and the government is trying to woo farmers back into farming.

Farmers are disgruntled with poor management forcing them to uproot coffee and plant other crops.

Roasters at the symposium said Kenya’s coffee has a comparative advantage over other countries due to its uniqueness in taste, saying they would increase the volumes to match growing demand from their customers.

Most of the Kenya’s coffee is exported as cleaned beans and just five per cent is roasted hence missing out on the added value from selling roasted and packaged coffee.

Kenya

Kenyans Turn to Camels to Cope With Climate Change

While parts of Kenya are becoming drier, a growing number of people are starting to keep camels. The animals are more… Read more »

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