Category archives for: Mining

Zimbabwe: Province Targets 700kgs Gold Output

Deputy mines minister Fred Moyo says government is working towards improving the operations of small-scale miners who have contributed significantly towards the revival of the country’s economy.

Addressing a breakfast meeting organised by Zimbabwe National Chamber of Commerce (ZNCC) at a local hotel last week, Moyo said government has given small scale miners in the province a target of producing 700 kilogrammes of gold this year.

Last year (2016) Manicaland produced half a tonne.

Government is trying to plug leakages of gold by luring small-scale miners to channel their gold through formal channels.

“We really appreciate what you did last year. You produced half a tonne of gold,” said Moyo.

“Let’s pull together 700 kgs of gold but if you could do a tonne we will be very happy. Gold is the mineral that is anchoring our economy so let’s continue to strive.”

ZNCC Manicaland chapter secretary Kenneth Saruchera implored government to avail funding to the sector to improve production.

“We hope government would finance the sector as individual miners can only finance themselves only to a certain extent…

“Small-scale miners can increase gold production if they have the requisite technology and working capital to improve production efficiencies,” he said.

The deputy minister concurred saying; “There is need for capitalisation of the sector as they are only able to extract 60 percent of the gold in the ore they are extracting.”

Moyo said the small-scale miners were working hard to mine gold from the ground but were still losing 30 percent of the mineral because they were not using modern technology.

The country has begun the process of decriminalising the artisanal mining to enable the sector to contribute meaningful to the growth of the economy.

Manicaland Miners Association chairperson, Lovemore Kaswa, said the move was “noble as it offered some unemployed youths a chance to get involved in mining”.

Kaswa said this has also increased flow of gold to Fidelity Printers and Refiners.

“Small scale miners have contributed nearly 40 percent of the total output since 2015 when government decriminalized artisanal mining,” Kaswa said.

Gold is the country’s second largest mineral export after platinum. Between 1980 and August 2016, the country extracted about 586 tons of gold.

Annual gold production peaked in 1999 at 30, 2 tones and was at its lowest in 2008 at just three tones.

Zimbabwe has more than 700,000 small-scale gold miners whose production can push volumes if they are all embraced by the formal system.

Zimbabwe

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South Africa: Mining Company to Begin Mediation Talks With Northern Cape Community

By Natalie Pertsovsky

Conditions in Dingleton are intolerable says attorney

Kumba Iron Ore representatives are expected to enter into mediation talks with the Dingleton community this week in a bid to resolve a dispute over land in the area. Kumba wants to relocate the entire town of Dingleton to a town 25km away. Only 25 families remain and are refusing to move on Kumba’s terms.

“We are hoping the mediation will assist us in the interpretation of the International Finance Corporate Guidelines. These are the guidelines that Kumba must comply to,” says Richard Spoor, an attorney representing some Dingleton residents. Kumba has denied this claim.

Kumba says the residents disrupted the process of rehabilitation of a site near a railway where blue asbestos was spilled years ago. The company needs to rehabilitate the site in order to expand its Sishen iron ore mine near Dingleton.

Spoor told GroundUp that a court case that was lodged against Dingleton residents in February by Kumba was ongoing. He says the matter “was likely” to be resolved soon.

Kumba is demanding over R1.6 million from residents who refused to relocate. The mining company says residents are “disrupting the process of rehabilitating” a site near the railway where blue asbestos was spilled years ago.

“The case will be stayed [meaning further legal procedures will halt] pending the outcome of the mediation process,” says Spoor. “The conditions in Dingleton are intolerable,” says Spoor. “We’d like to reach an agreement of terms of the resettlement of residents.”

He says the mediation would be facilitated by human rights attorney Brian Currin.

South Africa

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Namibia: Recovering Diamond Market Could Result in More Cutting and Polishing Factories

By Edgar Brandt

Windhoek — With diamond sales demand picking up in 2017, coupled with a relatively new sales and marketing agreement between the government and De Beers, the Namibia Diamond Trading Company (NDTC) has not ruled out the possibility of more players entering the cutting a polishing arena.

This is according to the NDTC, which currently sells rough stones to 11 local cutting and polishing factories, known as sightholders, who purchase the precious stones directly from the NDTC for local value addition.

Since its inception, NDTC has paid out N$1,7 billion in dividends to both its shareholders (government and De Beers) and has paid about N$1,1 billion in taxes to government.

According to senior manager for sales and marketing at NDTC Brent Esieb, the industry already witnessed string demand during the first quarter of 2017 and he foresees this trend continuing for the rest of the year. This follows a dramatic drop in sales in the second half of 2015.

Consumer demand for diamonds returned to somewhat normal levels during 2016, which saw a stable demand for both polished and rough diamonds.

The government and De Beers signed a new Diamond Sorting, Valuing, Sales and Marketing Agreement in May 2016, of which one of the key outcomes was the increase of the Local Offer Threshold to a price indexed annual amount of US$430 million.

In addition to the increased Local Offer Threshold, the local diamond cutting and polishing industry has seen NDTC offering all the +10.8 carats, including stones classified as ‘exceptional’, to its Namibian customers. These changes are anticipated to have a significant positive impact on the growth and long-term sustainability of the Namibian cutting and polishing industry.

Other suspected benefits included increased opportunities for job creation and skills transfer, investment in infrastructure (including technology) and further integration and empowerment of Namibians at all stages of the diamond value chain.

NDTC has since introduced a minimum supply level of US$15 million, with the objective of starting all local diamond cutting and polishing factories off at a level of supply that ensures reasonable viability and sustainability.

CEO of NDTC Shihaleni Ndjaba recently stated that the partnership between NDTC and the current 11 sightholders has been successful in creating a remarkably resilient local downstream beneficiation industry.

“Since the advent of beneficiation sales in 2007, NDTC has sold close to N$26 billion worth of rough diamonds to be cut and polished in Namibia. This has enabled NDTC Sightholders to not only directly employ close to 1,000 polishers, but has also resulted in significant investment in infrastructure and technology in the Namibian cutting and polishing industry, which in turn has improved the industry’s competitiveness,” Ndjaba said.

A few weeks ago Mines and Energy Minister Obeth Kandjoze castigated local sightholders for a lack of local value addition, or beneficiation, after diamond export data from the Office of the Diamond Commissioner indicated that only about 20 percent of the total beneficiation sales made by NDTC during 2016 was processed locally.

Kandjoze noted that a mass export of rough diamonds is not only a loss to the country, but more importantly undermines government’s efforts to eradicate poverty and unemployment, as well as its efforts to improve the lives of ordinary citizens. At the time Ndjaba said the minister’s position is crucial in the context of NDTC’s mandate of supporting and facilitating beneficiation.

“The minister has clearly articulated government’s expectations and aspirations from a beneficiation standpoint and we are happy to state that this position is fully aligned to the NDTC rough distribution strategy of allocating a greater share of our rough diamonds to those sightholders that maximise the cutting and polishing of their purchases from NDTC in country,” he said.

Ndjaba further alluded that – following Kandoze’s call – NDCT has already seen progress in the percentage of local diamond beneficiation.

Tanzania: Should Tanzania Make Own Way On Coal?

opinionBy Geoff Hill

What we mine and how we generate power has become a global topic. But while it’s easy to lecture from the comfort of Europe or America, GEOFF HILL says the problem in Africa is different.

Is Tanzania on the wrong side of climate change by digging new coal mines and using the stuff to make electricity?

The country sits on potential coal reserves of a staggering five billion tons — the largest in East Africa — mostly in the south with the main deposit near Njombe in the south west, close to Malawi.

Yet only 250 000 tons are mined annually.

As Kenya plans its first coal-fired power station at Lamu, there’s one on the drawing board for Mtwara, 560 kilometres south of Dar es Salaam.

The port at Mtwara was built by Britain in the 1940s for the disastrous Tanganyika Groundnut Scheme that failed to take off, but in recent years it has been refurbished and can now take large ships, raising the possibility of coal exports.

The power plant would supply electricity to the nearby Dangote cement factory and surrounding towns.

After 55 years of independence, less than one-in-five Tanzanians has access to the power grid and environmentalists have raised concern about the use of fire wood for cooking and heating and a chronic loss of trees.

But plans for coal come at a time when groups including Greenpeace and NGOs linked to climate change condemn fossil fuels as archaic and polluting.

That doesn’t solve the problem of more than 600 million people across Africa who have no access to electricity except through their own diesel or petrol-fired generator where the cost-per-watt can be ten times that from a power station.

South Africa produces nearly 20 times more electricity than Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya combined, 90 per cent from coal. Botswana is opening new coal mines and power stations, and both Ghana and Nigeria are on the same path.

Donald Trump has pledged to bring back the great pits of Wyoming and along the Appalachian Mountains where thousands have lost their jobs, and Australia is building new carbon power plants.

But clean-burn technology has revolutionised the industry in Europe, Australia, even India, and Trump has pledged money to bring emissions down further.

Two-thirds of America’s energy comes from the black stuff and in latest figures, coal supply has jumped more than 20 per cent.

But unlike Africa, no one in the developed world has to worry about keeping the lights on.

Environmentalists say solar would be a better and quicker option, but it hasn’t been the case in India.

The state of Maharashtra around the financial capital, Mumbai, has seen more than 1,700 villages and settlements plunged into darkness after thieves stole solar panels, only recently installed by government.

Across Africa, Asia and South America, guarding panels has become a problem, with police, private security and even the army on patrol 24/7.

At night, solar energy has to be stored in giant batteries with limited life. And when its cloudy, generation can fall by 90 per cent.

Even in China, hailed for its move to cleaner fuel, solar makes up less than one per cent of the power supply, though this will grow. And while new mines have been shelved, Beijing is building 79 coal-fired plants in countries like Pakistan, Turkey, Indonesia and across the Balkans.

In a single week, China imports 60 times more coal than Tanzania mines in a year.

Electricity is the lifeblood of progress. Hospitals – especially operating theatres — cannot run without it and anything from snake serum to HIV drugs need to be kept in a fridge.

Planed new rail lines linking the East African coast with the hinterland will be electric, but the watts need to be generated. And while the rest of the world mines coal, should poor countries be made to leave it in the ground?

With huge amounts of this cheapest of fuels still untouched in a land where more than a third of people live below the UN poverty line, it’s a tough call for government.

And, starting from scratch with its first coal-fired plant at Mtwara, Tanzania has a chance to use the latest clean-burn technology where less than one per cent of emissions enter the atmosphere.

The challenge is to ensure that, unlike much of Africa, everyone in Tanzania can simply flick a switch and enjoy what the rich world takes for granted.

Geoff Hill is a Zimbabwean writer who works across the African continent. He is a frequent visitor to Tanzania.

Ghana: Fighting a Battle With One’s Hands Tied to One’s Back

opinionBy Victor Owusu-Bediako

The nature and extent of the damage that has been done to our landscape and water-bodies is such that I sometimes wonder whether an evil spell has been cast on some of our people so as to make them utterly stupid.

Videos and still pictures of rivers and streams that have been destroyed by galamsey have flooded the media – even before the media coalition against galamsey was inaugurated – so that no-one can say that he/she does not know what is really going on. And yet there are articulate people in this country who resort to a weird interpretation of words to try and persuade the public that galamsey is not illegal. Or that even if galamsey is illegal, “small-scale mining” is not illegal.

Amazingly, this deliberate confusion is apparently fostered by no less an organisation than the Minerals Commission, which is the statutory body charged with regulating the mining industry in Ghana. A report in the Daily Guide of 21 April 2017 makes this very clear:

QUOTE: “The Minister [of Lands and Mineral Resources, Mr Peter Amewu] was upset with some top officials of the [Minerals] Commission, especially those at the Mines Inspectorate Directorate, whom he [accused of being] directly responsible for the galamsey menace. He was particularly shocked when officials of the Commission – the Chief Inspector of Mines, Obiri-Yeboah Twumasi, being one of them – were unable to tell him which mining companies had licences to operate in some particular areas… ,

“[This painted] a picture of such chief directors [as persons who operate] from their air-conditioned vehicles and offices without going to the field to know what’s actually happening. In view of that, Mr. Amewu … promised to employ four mines inspectors in each mining district, nationwide, and give them motorbikes to help in the fight against illegal mining… .

“It [also] emerged during the tour that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which is supposed to assess the environmental impact of mining activities nationwide, is not monitoring the activities of small-scale miners. Mr. Amewu, who appeared visibly downhearted [at] the extent of damage caused to the environment in the districts [he] visited [accompanied by representatives of the media] had sought to find out why the Minerals Commission had not been able to ensure that mining activities are undertaken in a manner that does not cause destruction to the environment. But officials of the Commission argued that the EPA had not been helping them over the years and that the Agency was only preoccupied with the big mining firms”. UNQUOTE

In fact, the confusion at the Minerals Commission does not end at the fact that the Commission’s officials do not know that there is nothing like licensed “medium-scale” mining in Ghana. The confusion also extends to so-called “small-scale mining”, for according to one of our best legal brains, Mr Ace Ankomah, no licence for any type of mining operation in Ghana can be considered legal until it [the licence]has been ratified by Parliament!

Mr Ankomah said that “Mining rights and leases granted to small-scale mining firms have not been ratified by Parliament since the coming into force of the 1992 Constitution, which renders all [[such] mining operations in the country illegal… . He, therefore, demanded that all licences or leases granted small-scale mining that had not been ratified by Parliament must stop immediately because they were all illegal.

“Mr Ankomah made the disclosure when he led OccupyGhana to join a media coalition meeting in Accra … [comprising major media organisations] to wage a crusade against the ‘galamsey’ menace.

[Mr Ankomah said] QUOTE: Article 268 (1) of the 1992 Constitution states that: “Any transaction, contract or undertaking involving the grant of a right or concession by or on behalf of any person, including the Government of Ghana, to any other person or body of persons howsoever described, for the exploitation of any mineral, water or other natural resource of Ghana made or entered into after the coming into force of this Constitution shall be subject to ratification by Parliament.”UNQUOTE

Buttressing his point, Mr Ankomah stated that NO small-scale mining licences had been taken to Parliament to be ratified, for which reason, he called for an immediate end to all such mining operations, subject to the ratification of mining licences. He said the fight against galamsey should not only be limited to persons engaged in ‘pick axe’ mining but should also include [all] persons mining without the proper licences.

Mr Ankomah declared QUOTE: “Even if the Minerals Commission has issued a licence, [so long as] Parliament has not ratified [it], it should be considered [to be] galamsey. Our demand is that all [mining activities relating to licences] or leases that have not been to Parliament, must stop immediately because they are all illegal.”

Mr Ankomah added that OccupyGhana was determined to take legal actions to have galamsey stopped.

This revelation by Mr Ace Ankomah is of the greatest importance, for it robs the “double-talkers” who shamelessly argue for the continuation of galamsey (because they claim it is not “illegal”) of any excuse to advocate the existence of the evil practice.

Politicians, in particular, should be careful of what they say in support of galamsey.

For in arguing (1) that galamsey provides a living for unemployed youngsters and (2) that some galamsey operations are “legal” because the operators have been given licences by the Minerals Commission, they are undermining the very Constitution of Ghana that enables politicians to rule the country – no less.

The pro-galamsey politicians cannot argue that because armed robbery – although illegal – can result in some unemployed people obtaining a livelihood, it is to be tolerated by society. Highwaymen and fraudsters also obtain money from their operations. But the state descends on them with an iron hand when they commit the crimes which they have adopted as a way of life.

Galamsey must be viewed in the same light. It is illegal. It is dangerous to those who operate it. And it is destroying our water-bodies, which means it is an act of genocide. For it is rendering the future populace of Ghana incapable of surviving in the land of their birth. Without water to drink.

No-one would have the right to do that, even if it was legal. Anyway, only fools would wish to continue a practice that is visibly murderous, simply because they thought it was technically “legal”. Unfortunately, we do have quite a few of such murderous fools. Our Government should not pay the slightest attention to them.

Ghana: Govt Must Begin to Explore Other Minerals

By Kwame Dankwah

As the debate for the government to ban all forms of small scale mining rages on, a former Chief Executive Officer of the Ghana Chamber of Mines, Dr Joyce Aryee has suggested that the government considers developing other minerals for the youth to mine apart from gold.

According to the former Chamber of Mines chief, there are other equally economic viable minerals that can aid in the development of Ghana either than gold which has become the country’s focus.

Speaking during the town hall meeting organised by Accra-based radio station Joy FM to assess the 100 days of President Akufo-Addo’s government, Dr. Aryee said it was time for the attention on gold to be shifted to other minerals which can earn the country some forex like Kaolin and salt.

“We need to move away from just focusing on gold mining and to go into other forms of minerals; one of which is Kaolin, so that we can promote Ghanaians in mining. Even shell banks in some of the coastal areas, at Dodi, they grow and form shell banks which can be used in the cement factory and so on.”

“I think a positive attitude towards Ghanaians in mining, focusing on not gold but other minerals will actually aid our development and would be the way to go,” she added.

Kaolin is one of the most common minerals in Ghana. Kaolin powder is used in ceramics, medicine, coated paper, as a food additive, in toothpaste, as a light diffusing material in white incandescent light bulbs, and in cosmetics. It is generally the main component in porcelain.

The Vice President Dr. Mahamudu Bawumia who was the Guest of Honour and the main speaker at the town hall meeting agreed with Dr. Aryee.

“I share those views, as a country, a lot of the time we forget how much we really have in terms of resources and you were just pointing that out again, and I think it is very important because some of these minerals are in higher demand, much higher priced per tonne than gold and we should look at them.”

Ghana

Fighting a Battle With One’s Hands Tied to One’s Back

The nature and extent of the damage that has been done to our landscape and water-bodies is such that I sometimes wonder… Read more »

Ghana: Govt Must Begin to Explore Other Mineral Options

By Kwame Dankwah

As the debate for the government to ban all forms of small scale mining rages on, a former Chief Executive Officer of the Ghana Chamber of Mines, Dr Joyce Aryee has suggested that the government considers developing other minerals for the youth to mine apart from gold.

According to the former Chamber of Mines chief, there are other equally economic viable minerals that can aid in the development of Ghana either than gold which has become the country’s focus.

Speaking during the town hall meeting organised by Accra-based radio station Joy FM to assess the 100 days of President Akufo-Addo’s government, Dr. Aryee said it was time for the attention on gold to be shifted to other minerals which can earn the country some forex like Kaolin and salt.

“We need to move away from just focusing on gold mining and to go into other forms of minerals; one of which is Kaolin, so that we can promote Ghanaians in mining. Even shell banks in some of the coastal areas, at Dodi, they grow and form shell banks which can be used in the cement factory and so on.”

“I think a positive attitude towards Ghanaians in mining, focusing on not gold but other minerals will actually aid our development and would be the way to go,” she added.

Kaolin is one of the most common minerals in Ghana. Kaolin powder is used in ceramics, medicine, coated paper, as a food additive, in toothpaste, as a light diffusing material in white incandescent light bulbs, and in cosmetics. It is generally the main component in porcelain.

The Vice President Dr. Mahamudu Bawumia who was the Guest of Honour and the main speaker at the town hall meeting agreed with Dr. Aryee.

“I share those views, as a country, a lot of the time we forget how much we really have in terms of resources and you were just pointing that out again, and I think it is very important because some of these minerals are in higher demand, much higher priced per tonne than gold and we should look at them.”

Ghana

Fighting a Battle With One’s Hands Tied to One’s Back

The nature and extent of the damage that has been done to our landscape and water-bodies is such that I sometimes wonder… Read more »

Namibia: Zinc Mine Workers Down Tools

By Matheus Hamutenya

Rosh Pinah — Production at the Rosh Pinah Zinc Corporation’s mine came to a standstill yesterday after workers refused to work, saying they are fed up with the management’s failure to address their concerns.

The mine is owned by the Anglo-Swiss multinational commodity trading and mining company, Glencore.

About 320 workers at the mine on Wednesday around 20h00 locked the entrance to the mining area, with big rocks placed on the road leading to the entrance, while heavy-duty vehicles used in the underground mine were parked at the gate, blocking any vehicles from entering the site.

The workers say the management have continuously and deliberately refused to listen to them and address their issues of concern, which has left them with no option but to withhold their labour until their grievances are taken seriously.

Yesterday morning the gates were still locked and a meeting between the mine management and the Mine Workers Union (MUN) did not yield any positive results, while the workers continued to toyi-toyi at the main entrance, after the company’s efforts to have the police remove them by force allegedly failed.

During the short meeting, the chief operational officer Christo Horn issued the union representatives with a letter in response to their strike and called on them to return to work or face the consequences.

In the letter Horn indicated that the industrial action is illegal and unlawful, and serious misconduct, and informed workers to return to work by 15h00 yesterday, failure of which would result in necessary actions being taken.

“If employees do not return to their normal shift and working hours, they will face disciplinary action and their employment contracts might be terminated,” reads the letter seen by New Era.

Without an amicable solution from the first meeting, the workers were adamant they would not open the gate until their grievances are properly addressed.

Addressing the workers after the short meeting, MUN Rosh Pinah branch chairperson Allen Kalumbu said the workers will continue with their strike until a favourable solution is found, stressing that the issue is not whether the strike is legit or not, but rather how solutions to the problems affecting workers can be found.

“Whether it is legal or illegal our concerns and demands are genuine, so the issue of legality should not play a role here,” he stated.

He said workers have put their concerns on the table and it is now up to the management to respond to them, and not force the union to declare a dispute with the labour commission over something that can be solved internally.

The workers demand the removal of Andre Bergh, the engineering manager, and Angeline Hagen, the industrial relations specialist, whom they accuse of not respecting workers’ rights and Namibian laws.

Kalumbu told New Era that the workers are fed up with the “inhuman treatment” by the two managers, and demand that their contracts be terminated with immediate effect.

Kalumbu alleged that Bergh abuses workers and fires them at will, without following proper procedures as per the labour act.

“Nothing has been done, and now he has started firing people verbally without any disciplinary hearing or warning – some of these are as a result of simple scratches to heavy vehicles the workers operate,” he said.

He added that about 25 mine operators are on their final written warning, and a simple scratch to any heavy vehicle being operated by any of them will get them fired. This, he said, needs to come to an end, as employees are humans and can make errors especially with the dark working conditions underground.

He further said employees are unhappy over the way Hagen does her job, saying since she started many employees have been threatened and intimidated, while some have been charged unnecessarily.

While union and mine representatives were in another meeting late yesterday afternoon, workers sat around the entrance patiently waiting for some good news, but they say they will not stop if no agreement is reached.

Tanzania: Acacia Mining Reports Production Drop in First Quarter

Acacia Mining has announced gold production drop by almost 35,000 ounces in this year’s quarter one.

The company has associated the drop with the government directive to stop export of metallic mineral concentrate. The largest gold firm in the country said the ban, which was imposed early last month, has affected its revenue by 30 per cent.

However, gold sales of 184,744 ounces, was in line with Q1 2016. Its share price at Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange on Wednesday gained by 1.32 per cent to 13, 030/-.

Acacia CEO, Brad Gordon, said the impact of the ban in Q1meant that they have approximately 30,000 ounces of gold in concentrate on hand, which was produced but not yet sold.

“All-in Sustaining Cost per ounce sold (AISC) was impacted by sales being lower than production primarily due to the restriction,” Mr Gordon said in a statement yesterday.

The AISC still amounted to 934 US dollars per ounce sold– 877 US dollar per ounce prior to the impact of share-based payment valuations–3.0 per cent lower than Q1 2016. “AISC was impacted on a unit cost basis, and had we sold all of the ounces produced, AISC for the quarter would have been approximately 852 US dollars per ounce,” he said.

This has negatively impacted cash flow by approximately 33 million US dollars for the quarter. In addition, Acacia received approximately 22 million US dollars in advanced payments for concentrate produced in January and February and currently held up in the Dar es Salaam port waiting export ban lifting.

“The advanced payments may need to be refunded during the second quarter if the export ban is not lifted,” Mr Gordon warned. North Mara is unaffected due to 100 per cent of its production being dore. In 2016, the concentrate accounted for approximately 45 per cent of Bulyanhulu’s revenues and 55 per cent of Buzwagi’s revenues.

However, Acacia gold production increased by 15 per cent to 219,670 ounces compared to similar quarter last year. “At an operational level Acacia had a very strong start to the year, with production of 219,670 ounces delivered from our mines,” Mr Gordon said.

The CEO, however, said while talks with the government continue their three mines continue to operate as normal while sand stocks is piling up, at this stage there were no change to guidance for the year.

Tanzania

Govt Invites Investors for Natural Gas Distribution

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Nigeria: Buhari Constitutes Board of Solid Minerals Development Fund (Full List)

President Muhammadu Buhari on Thursday in Abuja approved the constitution of the Board of Solid Minerals Development Fund.

A statement by the Ministry of Mines and Steel Development said Mr. Buhari charged the seven-member board to carry out its duties diligently.

The statement signed by the Permanent Secretary in the ministry, Mohammed Abbas, said that the board had Uba Malami from Nasarawa State, a geologist and former Vice-President of the Abuja Chambers of Commerce, as Chairman.

Members of the board are Demola Gbadegesin, a mining investor and electrical engineer from Oyo State, and Theo Iseghohi, Managing Director of Nishan Industries Limited, who hails from Edo.

Other members are Samuel Eze, an accountant and former banker from Ebonyi State; Fatima Shinkafi, a chemist from Zamfara; Uwatt Bassey Uwatt from Akwa Ibom and Yinka Mubarak.

(NAN)

Nigeria

What Hope for Kaduna Airport After Abuja’s Upgrade?

On Wednesday, the Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport resumed operation, six weeks after it was shut down for the… Read more »

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